The future is limitless.

For a fee, drones could deliver food and groceries right at a customer’s doorstep from favorite restaurants and retailers.

That is essentially the idea behind Google parent Alphabet’s  (GOOGL) Wing Marketplace. And this latest innovation from the technology giant could be a huge investment opportunity.

Amazon has talked about the same idea in the past. But Alphabet’s moon shot factory, known as X, has been dabbling in drones for years.

Drones delivering products would reduce human labor costs and wait times, but pricing would be the key to success.

It is estimated that Wing Marketplace would charge customers a $6 drone delivery fee. The client base could include companies such as Chipotle Mexican Grill, Domino’s Pizza, Starbucks and Whole Foods.

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Alphabet is already in talks with several of these major players, and a pilot with Chipotle Mexican Grill was fairly successful among students.

Drone deliveries may fundamentally transform the landscape of ecommerce.

The ecommerce shipping business is primarily operated by FedEx and United Parcel Service, which have a stranglehold on the business because there is no cheaper and faster alternative for even shorter distances.

All that could change when these drones become fully functional, which would provide massive tailwinds for Alphabet.

Although Alibaba, Amazon or JD.com can launch drone services for its own deliveries, Alphabet’s Wing Marketplace offer this on a much larger scale. This is because not every ecommerce portal or even traditional retailer going online can afford to invest money in drone technology and have their own branded drone delivery service.

Once the idea is placed on a marketplace model, drones will be available for any company that wants to use this service.

Just like traditional deliveries, the economics of delivery in the case of drones are driven by route density and drop size.