Category Archives: 3dprintnerd.com

Wembi – Closed Loop Motorupgrade for 3D Printer


January 5, 2017 Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Google+ Press Release


Print faster, silently and more consistently, in higher resolution than has ever been possible
Backers: 22
Average Daily Pledges: €349
Average Pledge Per Backer: €158

Funding: €3,485 of €3,200
Dates: Dec 27th -> Jan 10th (14 days)
Project By: VentureBit

Print faster, silently and more consistently, in higher resolution than has ever been possible
Backers: 22
Average Daily Pledges: €349
Average Pledge Per Backer: €158

Funding: €3,485 of €3,200
Dates: Dec 27th -> Jan 10th (14 days)
Project By: VentureBit

Source from..

Organize Your Life With This DIY 3D Printed Wunderlist Task Printer

Wunderlist Task Printer: A Great Introductory Project to Electronics

Now, 3D printing your own 2D printer might sound like a challenging excursion, and the Wunderlist Task Printer project does require some time and effort to complete. But this DIY project is perfect for those looking searching for an obtainable introduction to combining 3D printing technology and electronics.

After the printing process is completed, Hodson breaks down the electronics assembly, software installation, and even provides the full code needed to operate and test the printer. So, if undertaking an ambitious

Adafruit-based 3D printing project has been sitting uncheck on your own personal to-do list, take a crack at building Wunderlist Task Printer and never forget another grocery item or important task again!

You can check out the full instructional for Hodson’s project on his website

Prototyping Corner.

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Pinshape’s Featured Designs – December 23rd


January 5, 2017 Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Google+ Pinshape


We weren’t planning on doing a Star Wars themed version of this week’s Featured Designs but given all of the new uploads, it looks like that’s going to be the case. If you’re looking for things similarly out of this world, check out our Space Design Contest for the chance to win a ZYYX+ 3D Printer!

Low-Poly R2D2 and C3PO by FLOWALISTIK

Previously, FLOWALISTIK released the low-poly Storm Trooper and Darth Vader and now he’s back for the release of Star Wars Rogue One! Both of these print easily in multiple pieces and assemble together. 

3D Printed Mechanical Clock by TheGoofy

This is the most mechanically impressive design we’ve seen. It runs on complex internal mechanics and a coil spring to accurately tell the time. A challenging but well worthwhile print. 

Star Wars Death Star by Doodle_Monkey

This Death Star looks pretty incredible and has the advantage of being printed in multiple slices that are combined together. Use it to explain the basics of 3D printing to relatives over the holidays. 

Air Raid Siren by Immaginaecrea

This hand cranked air raid siren will in fact “make it loud”. It’s made of several easy-to-print parts that assemble together. 

4 Colors Kinematics Home Bracelets by Immagineaecrea

This bracelet comes with even more designs than just that seen in the picture. Mix and match different patterns to create some truly exciting geometries. 

AT-AT by jose_aj

We’ll close out this (accidental) Star Wars Featured Designs with an AT-AT! This was designed with 3D printing in mind so it’s printed in multiple parts and assembled together. 

That’s all for this week. Enjoy the holidays and check out Pinshape for more great designs!


We weren’t planning on doing a Star Wars themed version of this week’s Featured Designs but given all of the new uploads, it looks like that’s going to be the case. If you’re looking for things similarly out of this world, check out our Space Design Contest for the chance to win a ZYYX+ 3D Printer!

Low-Poly R2D2 and C3PO by FLOWALISTIK

Previously, FLOWALISTIK released the low-poly Storm Trooper and Darth Vader and now he’s back for the release of Star Wars Rogue One! Both of these print easily in multiple pieces and assemble together. 

3D Printed Mechanical Clock by TheGoofy

This is the most mechanically impressive design we’ve seen. It runs on complex internal mechanics and a coil spring to accurately tell the time. A challenging but well worthwhile print. 

Star Wars Death Star by Doodle_Monkey

This Death Star looks pretty incredible and has the advantage of being printed in multiple slices that are combined together. Use it to explain the basics of 3D printing to relatives over the holidays. 

Air Raid Siren by Immaginaecrea

This hand cranked air raid siren will in fact “make it loud”. It’s made of several easy-to-print parts that assemble together. 

4 Colors Kinematics Home Bracelets by Immagineaecrea

This bracelet comes with even more designs than just that seen in the picture. Mix and match different patterns to create some truly exciting geometries. 

AT-AT by jose_aj

We’ll close out this (accidental) Star Wars Featured Designs with an AT-AT! This was designed with 3D printing in mind so it’s printed in multiple parts and assembled together. 

That’s all for this week. Enjoy the holidays and check out Pinshape for more great designs!


Source from..

Most Popular 3D Designs of 2016


January 5, 2017 Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Google+ Pinshape


With 2016 coming to a close, it’s time to look back at this year’s most popular designs! The community has spoken and these were your most downloaded models of the year.

Phone Holder by ctrl design

This simple, easy to print, and unique phone holder takes our number 1 spot! Print it direct on platform and use it to hold a variety of different devices. 

Spiral Vase by BigBadBison

With all the vase designs out there, this relatively simple one by BigBadBison takes the prize. A great model for showing off unique printing and post-processing techniques. 

Elephant by le FabShop

This model by le FabShop prints deceptively easily with few supports and features a fully articulating head and legs! 

iCableGuards by 3DNG

Functional designs seem to be in this year so use these simple CableGuards by 3DNG will keep your Apple connectors from wearing out. 

Fully Assembled 3D Printable Wrench by DanielNoree

The most popular 3D Printable Wrench award goes to DanielNoree! This prints with no supports and is fully functional right off the bed.

Low Poly Pokemon by FLOWALISTIK

It’s no surprise that Flowalistik’s Low-Poly Pokemon have made the cut. Check out the newest addition to his low-poly series – C3PO and R2D2.

The Eiffel Tower Miniature by le FabShop

If the full-size Eiffel Tower is too intimidating a print, give this mini one a whirl. Be forewarned, the top will push your printer’s layer cooling to the limits.  

That wraps up the most popular designs of the year! Enter our Space Contest if you find yourself with a bit of time. 


With 2016 coming to a close, it’s time to look back at this year’s most popular designs! The community has spoken and these were your most downloaded models of the year.

Phone Holder by ctrl design

This simple, easy to print, and unique phone holder takes our number 1 spot! Print it direct on platform and use it to hold a variety of different devices. 

Spiral Vase by BigBadBison

With all the vase designs out there, this relatively simple one by BigBadBison takes the prize. A great model for showing off unique printing and post-processing techniques. 

Elephant by le FabShop

This model by le FabShop prints deceptively easily with few supports and features a fully articulating head and legs! 

iCableGuards by 3DNG

Functional designs seem to be in this year so use these simple CableGuards by 3DNG will keep your Apple connectors from wearing out. 

Fully Assembled 3D Printable Wrench by DanielNoree

The most popular 3D Printable Wrench award goes to DanielNoree! This prints with no supports and is fully functional right off the bed.

Low Poly Pokemon by FLOWALISTIK

It’s no surprise that Flowalistik’s Low-Poly Pokemon have made the cut. Check out the newest addition to his low-poly series – C3PO and R2D2.

The Eiffel Tower Miniature by le FabShop

If the full-size Eiffel Tower is too intimidating a print, give this mini one a whirl. Be forewarned, the top will push your printer’s layer cooling to the limits.  

That wraps up the most popular designs of the year! Enter our Space Contest if you find yourself with a bit of time. 


Source from..

Pinshape’s Featured Designs – December 30th


January 5, 2017 Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Google+ Pinshape


With New Years Day coming up, it’s time to spin up the printer and make some swizzle sticks! If you find yourself with a bit of downtime during the holidays, enter into our Space Design Contest for the chance to win a ZYYX+ 3D Printer. 

3D-printed Watch with Tourbillon by TheGoofy

This is a 3D printed, fully functional watch that runs on a compressed coil. It makes for a challenging print and assembly but is great for showing off the capabilities of 3D printing. 

Simple Pine Tree by CreativeTools

CreativeTools may have been a little late with this Christmas tree design but it’s not too early to start preparing for next year! Print flat on the build platform and easily assemble together. 

New Years Party Picks and Swizzle Sticks by barb_3dprintny

We can’t guarantee the food safety of these 2017 Swizzle Sticks but we can promise that they’ll bring more life to the party. Barb designed them in a variety of different sizes for full coverage of snacks and beverages alike. 

K-2SO by Getxoblues

This K-2SO prints deceptively easily and has a clever mechanism for assembling together. Give it a print in differently colored materials to make your very own desk droid. 

GoPro Hero 5 NinjaFlex Case with Tripod by Adafruit

Ninjaflex is great for functional designs like this case for the GoPro Hero 5. Adafruit also designed it with a mechanism on the bottom for attaching to a tripod. 

Star Wars – Darth Vader by Medelis

Medelis designed this Darth Vader as an anti-stress toy. Give him a print in a flexible material and squeeze away venting your frustration. 

That’s all for this week. Enjoy the holidays and check out Pinshape for more great designs!


With New Years Day coming up, it’s time to spin up the printer and make some swizzle sticks! If you find yourself with a bit of downtime during the holidays, enter into our Space Design Contest for the chance to win a ZYYX+ 3D Printer. 

3D-printed Watch with Tourbillon by TheGoofy

This is a 3D printed, fully functional watch that runs on a compressed coil. It makes for a challenging print and assembly but is great for showing off the capabilities of 3D printing. 

Simple Pine Tree by CreativeTools

CreativeTools may have been a little late with this Christmas tree design but it’s not too early to start preparing for next year! Print flat on the build platform and easily assemble together. 

New Years Party Picks and Swizzle Sticks by barb_3dprintny

We can’t guarantee the food safety of these 2017 Swizzle Sticks but we can promise that they’ll bring more life to the party. Barb designed them in a variety of different sizes for full coverage of snacks and beverages alike. 

K-2SO by Getxoblues

This K-2SO prints deceptively easily and has a clever mechanism for assembling together. Give it a print in differently colored materials to make your very own desk droid. 

GoPro Hero 5 NinjaFlex Case with Tripod by Adafruit

Ninjaflex is great for functional designs like this case for the GoPro Hero 5. Adafruit also designed it with a mechanism on the bottom for attaching to a tripod. 

Star Wars – Darth Vader by Medelis

Medelis designed this Darth Vader as an anti-stress toy. Give him a print in a flexible material and squeeze away venting your frustration. 

That’s all for this week. Enjoy the holidays and check out Pinshape for more great designs!


Source from..

How To Make a $30 DIY 3D Scanner


January 5, 2017 Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Google+ Pinshape


As the cost of 3D printers continues to drop, our Designer of the Month Daveyclk aspires to lower the cost of 3D scanning as well! His design can be made for around $30 and makes use of a cell phone camera. 


What is Photogrammetry?

Photogrammetry is the science of obtaining measurements from photographs, especially for recovering the exact positions of surface points. It can also be used to recover the motion pathways of designated reference points on any moving object, on its components, and in the immediately adjacent environment.

In short, it gives the ability to create a 3D mesh from multiple photographs by comparing similarities between the images and triangulating them in 3D space. Photogrammetry has been around for a while, but it wasn’t until Autodesk got involved with its Memento beta program that things began to work consistently. Memento was renamed ReMake when it left the beta phase. Sounds like magic right? Well, it’s not magic, this is a reality. Now anyone can have a go at 3D scanning without having to spend hundreds on a scanner. Even the open source scanners that are available require quite a lot of knowledge to get them working properly. With photogrammetry, anyone can have a play.

More information on photogrammetry can be found here.

981f44_491290e7240848c28b532ddc7d99133b


Why did I create the turntable?

The inspiration for this design came from a simple desire to create easy consistent 3D geometry, I wanted to remove human error and wobble! I was also aware that it should be kept simple. So I designed it to be almost completely mechanical.

All you need is your smart phone (in my case an iPhone 6 plus), the included headphones, and a turntable printed out. The first version was designed to be printed out in large pieces (I have a Type A Machines Series 1 with a cubic foot build volume) and one of the biggest requests I had was to split the model up into smaller pieces. So I listened, and for the newest version there have been a few improvements including a height adjustable cradle and a base that is now split into 4 pieces with dovetail joints.

The way it works is this: You turn the crank, and for every complete revolution of the turntable the phone’s camera is triggered by the headphone volume 50 times.

Simple! Transfer the pics to your computer then use Autodesk ReMake to work its magic.

I created a full tutorial over on hackster.io, check out this link for further details.

container_the-30-3d-scanner-update-3d-printing-108555

button_create-your-own-3d-scanner


What have I been using it for?

So far, I’ve mostly been experimenting, and mass producing small versions of my daughter’s cuddly toys. Winning favour with your children can be a very useful thing!

I was amazed with how well Thumper came out! And as you’d expect from rabbits, they’ve bred and now we have a house full!

thumper


Why do I like ReMake?

How can you not like ReMake?! It’s amazing, not only does it create a mesh so well, it also gives you the tools to tweak that mesh, repair holes, flatten it, prepare it for 3D printing or even prepare it as a 3D asset for gaming or visualization! Amazing! Simply amazing!

For more information on Autodesk ReMake and for a free trial, check out the website https://remake.autodesk.com/about

container_3d-scanned-thumper-3d-printing-83868


What’s next?

Well, seeing as Apple has removed the headphone jack for the iPhone 7 and above, I will be working on an upgraded version that uses a cheap bluetooth camera trigger (pilfered from one of those ghastly selfie sticks). This will replace the need for the headphone jack. The original version will still be available, but with everything there is always room for improvement.

The feedback I’ve had from the maker community has been great, and really helped drive the changes in this design, for that I am thankful.

Any further feedback on this design or any of my others is greatly received. If you can see anyway that things can be approved, I’d love to hear from you

My twitter and insta handles are @daveyclk, these are the best places to get hold of me.

button_create-your-own-3d-scanner

As the cost of 3D printers continues to drop, our Designer of the Month Daveyclk aspires to lower the cost of 3D scanning as well! His design can be made for around $30 and makes use of a cell phone camera. 


What is Photogrammetry?

Photogrammetry is the science of obtaining measurements from photographs, especially for recovering the exact positions of surface points. It can also be used to recover the motion pathways of designated reference points on any moving object, on its components, and in the immediately adjacent environment.

In short, it gives the ability to create a 3D mesh from multiple photographs by comparing similarities between the images and triangulating them in 3D space. Photogrammetry has been around for a while, but it wasn’t until Autodesk got involved with its Memento beta program that things began to work consistently. Memento was renamed ReMake when it left the beta phase. Sounds like magic right? Well, it’s not magic, this is a reality. Now anyone can have a go at 3D scanning without having to spend hundreds on a scanner. Even the open source scanners that are available require quite a lot of knowledge to get them working properly. With photogrammetry, anyone can have a play.

More information on photogrammetry can be found here.

981f44_491290e7240848c28b532ddc7d99133b


Why did I create the turntable?

The inspiration for this design came from a simple desire to create easy consistent 3D geometry, I wanted to remove human error and wobble! I was also aware that it should be kept simple. So I designed it to be almost completely mechanical.

All you need is your smart phone (in my case an iPhone 6 plus), the included headphones, and a turntable printed out. The first version was designed to be printed out in large pieces (I have a Type A Machines Series 1 with a cubic foot build volume) and one of the biggest requests I had was to split the model up into smaller pieces. So I listened, and for the newest version there have been a few improvements including a height adjustable cradle and a base that is now split into 4 pieces with dovetail joints.

The way it works is this: You turn the crank, and for every complete revolution of the turntable the phone’s camera is triggered by the headphone volume 50 times.

Simple! Transfer the pics to your computer then use Autodesk ReMake to work its magic.

I created a full tutorial over on hackster.io, check out this link for further details.

container_the-30-3d-scanner-update-3d-printing-108555

button_create-your-own-3d-scanner


What have I been using it for?

So far, I’ve mostly been experimenting, and mass producing small versions of my daughter’s cuddly toys. Winning favour with your children can be a very useful thing!

I was amazed with how well Thumper came out! And as you’d expect from rabbits, they’ve bred and now we have a house full!

thumper


Why do I like ReMake?

How can you not like ReMake?! It’s amazing, not only does it create a mesh so well, it also gives you the tools to tweak that mesh, repair holes, flatten it, prepare it for 3D printing or even prepare it as a 3D asset for gaming or visualization! Amazing! Simply amazing!

For more information on Autodesk ReMake and for a free trial, check out the website https://remake.autodesk.com/about

container_3d-scanned-thumper-3d-printing-83868


What’s next?

Well, seeing as Apple has removed the headphone jack for the iPhone 7 and above, I will be working on an upgraded version that uses a cheap bluetooth camera trigger (pilfered from one of those ghastly selfie sticks). This will replace the need for the headphone jack. The original version will still be available, but with everything there is always room for improvement.

The feedback I’ve had from the maker community has been great, and really helped drive the changes in this design, for that I am thankful.

Any further feedback on this design or any of my others is greatly received. If you can see anyway that things can be approved, I’d love to hear from you

My twitter and insta handles are @daveyclk, these are the best places to get hold of me.

button_create-your-own-3d-scanner

Source from..

A 3D Printing Christmas Story from 3DP


January 5, 2017 Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Google+ 3DPlatform.com


The Alfie Edition is fully parametric and customizable using Thingiverse Customizer to produce all of the files correctly scaled, based on the recipients real world measurements.

The Alfie Edition is fully parametric and customizable using Thingiverse Customizer to produce all of the files correctly scaled, based on the recipients real world measurements.

3D printing has helped another family in a personal way. 3D Platform (3DP) (Roscoe, Illinois, USA) teamed up with DimensionWorks (Ocala, Florida, USA), 3D Rapid Prototyping (Garden Grove, California, USA), and a small group of people from around the country to make Christmas a little better for Chris and Sonia Choquette’s son, Aidan.

“We learned about Aidan at the Manufacturers Association of Florida conference in mid-November,” says Don McFarlane, Roadshow Tech for 3DP. “He had been waiting for a prosthetic arm for over a year through the normal medical routes. We knew we could provide a quicker solution, so we looked into alternative prosthetics and came to a collaborative decision to use the E-nable “Alfie” arm designed by Team UnLimbited.”

Referring to Thingiverse’s article “The Unlimbited Arm v2.0 – Alfie Edition,” 3DP customized the arm to perfectly fit the size and shape of Aidan’s arm. The Enabling the Future group allows people with 3D printers to create articulated prosthetics for amputees and others with missing fingers, hands, or even, as in this case, lower arms. Once sizing was completed, it was on to the most critical part: color. Aidan’s favorite color is blue, so the end-result had to be a great shade in a strong material that would hold up to his daily activities of playing and having fun.

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After all the parts were printed, it was time to clean them up and assemble them. 3DP used a new support material called Scaffholding from the online store, E3D, which broke away with little residue. What remained was washed away with warm water.

“One challenge we faced was removing the support material from the line guide on the forearm,” explains McFarlane. “One trick we tried was using a metal coat hanger to push the support material out. This had limited success as the material would break loose but didn’t come out of the middle area of the printed object. The alternative was using a long drill bit and drilling at slow speeds to clean out the guide holes.”

“To assemble the prosthetic, we looked at some online videos,” explains McFarlane. “We did need some help with the cord routing and part identification, because some of the parts looked similar, and some reference images didn’t distinctly show the smaller parts.” Sourcing the small rubber bands that Team UnLimbited recommended (ones made for dental braces) was difficult, so 3DP decided to use small hairbands instead. “Placing them was simple and surprisingly quick. The control lines were a bit trickier. We used fishing line, but had to super-glue the knots so they wouldn’t untie,” explains McFarlane.

Two completed prosthetics were printed (one by 3DP, the other by 3D Rapid Prototyping) one of which was delivered to Aidan on Christmas Eve. The second one was printed for spare parts, and shipped the following week. “Chris and Sonia informed us that Aidan wants to use his new arm to learn how to ride his bike,” says McFarlane.  “We are all honored to help him achieve his goal, and we look forward to helping others in the near future.”

The Alfie Edition is fully parametric and customizable using Thingiverse Customizer to produce all of the files correctly scaled, based on the recipients real world measurements.

The Alfie Edition is fully parametric and customizable using Thingiverse Customizer to produce all of the files correctly scaled, based on the recipients real world measurements.

3D printing has helped another family in a personal way. 3D Platform (3DP) (Roscoe, Illinois, USA) teamed up with DimensionWorks (Ocala, Florida, USA), 3D Rapid Prototyping (Garden Grove, California, USA), and a small group of people from around the country to make Christmas a little better for Chris and Sonia Choquette’s son, Aidan.

“We learned about Aidan at the Manufacturers Association of Florida conference in mid-November,” says Don McFarlane, Roadshow Tech for 3DP. “He had been waiting for a prosthetic arm for over a year through the normal medical routes. We knew we could provide a quicker solution, so we looked into alternative prosthetics and came to a collaborative decision to use the E-nable “Alfie” arm designed by Team UnLimbited.”

Referring to Thingiverse’s article “The Unlimbited Arm v2.0 – Alfie Edition,” 3DP customized the arm to perfectly fit the size and shape of Aidan’s arm. The Enabling the Future group allows people with 3D printers to create articulated prosthetics for amputees and others with missing fingers, hands, or even, as in this case, lower arms. Once sizing was completed, it was on to the most critical part: color. Aidan’s favorite color is blue, so the end-result had to be a great shade in a strong material that would hold up to his daily activities of playing and having fun.

"<yoastmark

After all the parts were printed, it was time to clean them up and assemble them. 3DP used a new support material called Scaffholding from the online store, E3D, which broke away with little residue. What remained was washed away with warm water.

“One challenge we faced was removing the support material from the line guide on the forearm,” explains McFarlane. “One trick we tried was using a metal coat hanger to push the support material out. This had limited success as the material would break loose but didn’t come out of the middle area of the printed object. The alternative was using a long drill bit and drilling at slow speeds to clean out the guide holes.”

“To assemble the prosthetic, we looked at some online videos,” explains McFarlane. “We did need some help with the cord routing and part identification, because some of the parts looked similar, and some reference images didn’t distinctly show the smaller parts.” Sourcing the small rubber bands that Team UnLimbited recommended (ones made for dental braces) was difficult, so 3DP decided to use small hairbands instead. “Placing them was simple and surprisingly quick. The control lines were a bit trickier. We used fishing line, but had to super-glue the knots so they wouldn’t untie,” explains McFarlane.

Two completed prosthetics were printed (one by 3DP, the other by 3D Rapid Prototyping) one of which was delivered to Aidan on Christmas Eve. The second one was printed for spare parts, and shipped the following week. “Chris and Sonia informed us that Aidan wants to use his new arm to learn how to ride his bike,” says McFarlane.  “We are all honored to help him achieve his goal, and we look forward to helping others in the near future.”

Source from..

3D Printer Shield


January 5, 2017 Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Google+ Press Release


The 3D Printer Shield is a low cost solution for increasing print quality, by utilizing an enclosed print environment.
Backers: 10
Average Daily Pledges: $119
Average Pledge Per Backer: $178

Funding: $1,780 of $10,000
Dates: Dec 22nd -> Jan 21st (30 days)
Project By: Perception Engineering, LLC

The 3D Printer Shield is a low cost solution for increasing print quality, by utilizing an enclosed print environment.
Backers: 10
Average Daily Pledges: $119
Average Pledge Per Backer: $178

Funding: $1,780 of $10,000
Dates: Dec 22nd -> Jan 21st (30 days)
Project By: Perception Engineering, LLC

Source from..

The M2K 3D Printer : The Learning Aid For STEM Technology


January 5, 2017 Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Google+ Press Release


The printer is supplied as a kit that is assembled by anyone who wants to learn STEM Technology. The printer comes with a 5 day course.
Backers: 4
Average Daily Pledges: $138 AUD
Average Pledge Per Backer: $483 AUD

Funding: $1,930 AUD of $10,000 AUD
Dates: Dec 23rd -> Jan 22nd (30 days)
Project By: Don McGuinness

The printer is supplied as a kit that is assembled by anyone who wants to learn STEM Technology. The printer comes with a 5 day course.
Backers: 4
Average Daily Pledges: $138 AUD
Average Pledge Per Backer: $483 AUD

Funding: $1,930 AUD of $10,000 AUD
Dates: Dec 23rd -> Jan 22nd (30 days)
Project By: Don McGuinness

Source from..

How to Make your Prints Glow with Glow in the Dark Resin and Filament


January 5, 2017 Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Google+ Pinshape


The days are getting a bit darker so we wanted light things up with glow-in-the-dark filament and resin. We’ll be going over some highly dubious chemistry to make glow-in-the-dark  resin as well as showcasing some of the top filament. 

Glowing Resin

As far as I’m aware, glow-in-the-dark resin doesn’t exist on the market (for good reason) so we made some. Be forewarned, this isn’t something we recommend but it made for some neat pictures. glow in the dark resin moai

We mixed Formlabs’ White Resin with an arbitrary amount of glow-in-the-dark powder. If you’re interested in measurements, I’d estimate we used a bit more than half of a 10 gram container of glow powder in a tank of resin. Using Open Mode, we printed out these Low Poly Moai by steven_dakh. Note that it’s important to use Open Mode as the glow powder will change the properties of the resin. 

After spending a bit of time in the sun, our Moai were ready to go. The green and orange powders were by far the most fluorescent but the others produced a fair bit of light as well. If you’re interested in seeing Formlabs’ print quality (with slightly less dubious materials), check out the free sample request form!

ColorFabb Glowing Filament

ColorFabb makes a material called Glowfill that is PLA/PHA based and has glow-in-the-dark powder mixed in. It might have been more appropriate to do several smaller prints with this, but we were feeling ambitious so with the new Star Wars movie coming out, we decided to make a full size storm trooper helmet. The design was comprised of 20 different pieces and we printed each of them out and sanded the edges. The sanding helps make things a bit easier when we get to gluing. glow in the dark resin stormtrooper and c3po

After several hours of sanding and gluing and frankly much too many super-glue fumes inhaled, our helmet was assembled. Cyanoacrylate based super glue makes for a great adhesive with a variety of different materials. We admittedly shined a high-power studio light on the helmet before taking the next picture but it made the helmet glow very brightly. 

You might have noticed the glow-in-the-dark spray paint in our first image. We had mixed results with this but there are a number of brands you can try and it might prove easier than questionable resin chemistry. 

Before you go, here are a few designs we think would look great using these materials!

The days are getting a bit darker so we wanted light things up with glow-in-the-dark filament and resin. We’ll be going over some highly dubious chemistry to make glow-in-the-dark  resin as well as showcasing some of the top filament. 

Glowing Resin

As far as I’m aware, glow-in-the-dark resin doesn’t exist on the market (for good reason) so we made some. Be forewarned, this isn’t something we recommend but it made for some neat pictures. glow in the dark resin moai

We mixed Formlabs’ White Resin with an arbitrary amount of glow-in-the-dark powder. If you’re interested in measurements, I’d estimate we used a bit more than half of a 10 gram container of glow powder in a tank of resin. Using Open Mode, we printed out these Low Poly Moai by steven_dakh. Note that it’s important to use Open Mode as the glow powder will change the properties of the resin. 

After spending a bit of time in the sun, our Moai were ready to go. The green and orange powders were by far the most fluorescent but the others produced a fair bit of light as well. If you’re interested in seeing Formlabs’ print quality (with slightly less dubious materials), check out the free sample request form!

ColorFabb Glowing Filament

ColorFabb makes a material called Glowfill that is PLA/PHA based and has glow-in-the-dark powder mixed in. It might have been more appropriate to do several smaller prints with this, but we were feeling ambitious so with the new Star Wars movie coming out, we decided to make a full size storm trooper helmet. The design was comprised of 20 different pieces and we printed each of them out and sanded the edges. The sanding helps make things a bit easier when we get to gluing. glow in the dark resin stormtrooper and c3po

After several hours of sanding and gluing and frankly much too many super-glue fumes inhaled, our helmet was assembled. Cyanoacrylate based super glue makes for a great adhesive with a variety of different materials. We admittedly shined a high-power studio light on the helmet before taking the next picture but it made the helmet glow very brightly. 

You might have noticed the glow-in-the-dark spray paint in our first image. We had mixed results with this but there are a number of brands you can try and it might prove easier than questionable resin chemistry. 

Before you go, here are a few designs we think would look great using these materials!

Source from..

Tiko – Status Update 12/19/2016

3DPrintNerd.com is a 3D Printing Comparison Shopping Engine. With a commitment of delivering consumers a shopping experience, 3dprintnerd.com offers users easy to use search tools that will enable them to make educated decisions when making 3D printing purchases. 3Dprintnerd.com partnered with major shopping marketplaces such as Amazon Associates, Ebay Partners, and Prosperent and e-commerce sites committed in selling consumer and professional 3D printing products.

3D printing enabled ALTAIR satellite ready to launch in 2017 – 3D … – 3D Printing Industry


December 20, 2016 Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Google+ Product Reviews


Millennium Space Systems have reached a major development milestone for their ALTAIR satellite ahead of a proposed launch in March 2017. They have announced that the first satellite has completed development and been shipped. The satellite was enabled by additive manufacturing and has now gained flight qualification. 

Paul Swanson, Millennium Space’s Low Earth Orbit (LEO) constellations program manager, explained the importance of reaching this target,

This flight qualification of our ALTAIR™ spacecraft represents a key milestone in providing low-risk and very high-platform performance coupled with affordability as the company transitions to full-scale manufacturing of our ALTAIR™ product line and anticipated ALTAIR™ constellations.

ALTAIR satellite. Image via Millennium Space Systems.

ALTAIR satellite. Image via Millennium Space Systems.

The ALTAIR Satellite

The ALTAIR satellite is a pathfinder spacecraft which, according to Millennium Space Systems, demonstrates advanced avionics, guidance & control, additive manufacturing, power systems, RF communications and onboard processing technologies.’ Intended to be launched during a resupply of the International Space Station (ISS) from Cape Canaveral, Florida in March next year, the satellite will be released by astronauts within 30 to 60 days of its arrival on the ISS.  

The compact stowed volume of the NanoRacks ALTAIR Pathfinder. Image via Millennium Space Systems.

The compact stowed volume of the NanoRacks ALTAIR Pathfinder. Image via Millennium Space Systems.

Purpose of ALTAIR Satellite

The ALTAIR Pathfinder was developed to showcase the capabilities of a low-cost platform for low earth orbit (LEO) constellations. Millennium Space Systems are using NanoRacks as a launch service in order to test the device in LEO. NanoRacks from Houston, Texas represent a standardization of apparatus for LEO launches reducing costs by saving space. The company counts the European Space Agency and NASA among it’s customers. 

Paul Swanson from Millennium Space Systems gives a further update on the ALTAIR satellite and future plans,

Our manufacturing and production plan is in place to deliver hundreds of these vehicles each year. We have taken great measures to ensure that our spacecraft will work as designed through a series of environmental and functional tests culminating in our Pre-Ship Readiness Review and decision to ship the vehicle this week.  As we transition to high-volume production of these vehicles in our state-of-the-art spacecraft factory, ALTAIR™ provides the underpinnings to support resiliency, affordability, persistence and high-tech refresh, thereby enabling tailored constellations fielded quickly, effectively and affordably.

This development adds to other space news, including the International Space Station’s recent 3D printing competition winner. The competition asked entrants to use 3D printing to reduce costs in aerospace manufacturing and saw a proposal for a device that releases femtosatellites.

Featured image shows the NanoRacks ALTAIR Pathfinder. Image via Millennium Space Systems. 

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Millennium Space Systems have reached a major development milestone for their ALTAIR satellite ahead of a proposed launch in March 2017. They have announced that the first satellite has completed development and been shipped. The satellite was enabled by additive manufacturing and has now gained flight qualification. 

Paul Swanson, Millennium Space’s Low Earth Orbit (LEO) constellations program manager, explained the importance of reaching this target,

This flight qualification of our ALTAIR™ spacecraft represents a key milestone in providing low-risk and very high-platform performance coupled with affordability as the company transitions to full-scale manufacturing of our ALTAIR™ product line and anticipated ALTAIR™ constellations.

ALTAIR satellite. Image via Millennium Space Systems.

ALTAIR satellite. Image via Millennium Space Systems.

The ALTAIR Satellite

The ALTAIR satellite is a pathfinder spacecraft which, according to Millennium Space Systems, demonstrates advanced avionics, guidance & control, additive manufacturing, power systems, RF communications and onboard processing technologies.’ Intended to be launched during a resupply of the International Space Station (ISS) from Cape Canaveral, Florida in March next year, the satellite will be released by astronauts within 30 to 60 days of its arrival on the ISS.  

The compact stowed volume of the NanoRacks ALTAIR Pathfinder. Image via Millennium Space Systems.

The compact stowed volume of the NanoRacks ALTAIR Pathfinder. Image via Millennium Space Systems.

Purpose of ALTAIR Satellite

The ALTAIR Pathfinder was developed to showcase the capabilities of a low-cost platform for low earth orbit (LEO) constellations. Millennium Space Systems are using NanoRacks as a launch service in order to test the device in LEO. NanoRacks from Houston, Texas represent a standardization of apparatus for LEO launches reducing costs by saving space. The company counts the European Space Agency and NASA among it’s customers. 

Paul Swanson from Millennium Space Systems gives a further update on the ALTAIR satellite and future plans,

Our manufacturing and production plan is in place to deliver hundreds of these vehicles each year. We have taken great measures to ensure that our spacecraft will work as designed through a series of environmental and functional tests culminating in our Pre-Ship Readiness Review and decision to ship the vehicle this week.  As we transition to high-volume production of these vehicles in our state-of-the-art spacecraft factory, ALTAIR™ provides the underpinnings to support resiliency, affordability, persistence and high-tech refresh, thereby enabling tailored constellations fielded quickly, effectively and affordably.

This development adds to other space news, including the International Space Station’s recent 3D printing competition winner. The competition asked entrants to use 3D printing to reduce costs in aerospace manufacturing and saw a proposal for a device that releases femtosatellites.

Featured image shows the NanoRacks ALTAIR Pathfinder. Image via Millennium Space Systems. 

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Source from..

ALTAIR Pathfinder, equipped with 3D printing tech, to launch to ISS in 2017 – 3ders.org (blog)


December 20, 2016 Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Google+ Product Reviews


Dec 20, 2016 | By Tess

High-performance satellite developer Millennium Space Systems recently announced it has completed its very first ALTAIR satellite and is preparing to ship it into space. The preproduction satellite, the ALTAIR Pathfinder, has been developed for the specific purpose of demonstrating technologies such as additive manufacturing, advanced avionics, guidance and control, power systems, RF communications, and onboard processing technologies within space.

The ALTAIR Pathfinder is expected to launch into space on an International Space Station (ISS) resupply mission. The latter will launch from Cape Canaveral in March 2017. Once it reaches the ISS, Millennium Space Systems says the satellite will be kept on board the space station for 30 to 60 days before being released.

Impressively, and according to Jimmy Downs, the chief engineer for the ALTAIR Pathfinder, the satellite took less than 12 months to develop, from program inception to final ship date. This was achieved with the help of Houston-based NanoRacks LLC, which is providing launch services. As Downs commented, “Special thanks go to our NanoRacks launch provider–they’ve been nothing short of being responsive and helpful every step of the way since we signed the launch services agreement earlier this year.”

The ALTAIR Pathfinder was largely developed in order to test and demonstrate “next-generation hardware and software technologies”, which include additive manufacturing, advanced avionics, power systems, and more. These new technologies have opened up the possibility for new types of missions in space. That is, technologies such as 3D printing in space are helping to overcome certain challenges that previously existed, such as expensive costs of shipping parts into space, schedule limitations, and technology unavailability.

With its recent flight qualification, the ALTAIR Pathfinder could mark big advancements for new space technologies. As Paul Swanson, Millennium Space’s LEO (low-earth-orbit) constellations program manager explained, “This flight qualification of our ALTAIR™ spacecraft represents a key milestone in providing low-risk and very high-platform performance coupled with affordability as the company transitions to full-scale manufacturing of our ALTAIR™ product line and anticipated ALTAIR™ constellations.”

He continues: “Our manufacturing and production plan is in place to deliver hundreds of these vehicles each year. We have taken great measures to ensure that our spacecraft will work as designed through a series of environmental and functional tests culminating in our Pre-Ship Readiness Review and decision to ship the vehicle this week. As we transition to high-volume production of these vehicles in our state-of-the-art spacecraft factory, ALTAIR™ provides the underpinnings to support resiliency, affordability, persistence and high-tech refresh, thereby enabling tailored constellations fielded quickly, effectively and affordably.”

Founded in 2001, Millennium Space Systems has continually proposed and developed innovative and alternative solutions to the aerospace industry’s many challenges. Often working with the Department of Defense, NASA, and various commercial clients, Millennium Space Systems hopes to further advance new technologies, such as additive manufacturing, within space with the upcoming launch of its ALTAIR Pathfinder satellite.

Final preparation of the ALTAIR Pathfinder

Posted in 3D Printing Application

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Dec 20, 2016 | By Tess

High-performance satellite developer Millennium Space Systems recently announced it has completed its very first ALTAIR satellite and is preparing to ship it into space. The preproduction satellite, the ALTAIR Pathfinder, has been developed for the specific purpose of demonstrating technologies such as additive manufacturing, advanced avionics, guidance and control, power systems, RF communications, and onboard processing technologies within space.

The ALTAIR Pathfinder is expected to launch into space on an International Space Station (ISS) resupply mission. The latter will launch from Cape Canaveral in March 2017. Once it reaches the ISS, Millennium Space Systems says the satellite will be kept on board the space station for 30 to 60 days before being released.

Impressively, and according to Jimmy Downs, the chief engineer for the ALTAIR Pathfinder, the satellite took less than 12 months to develop, from program inception to final ship date. This was achieved with the help of Houston-based NanoRacks LLC, which is providing launch services. As Downs commented, “Special thanks go to our NanoRacks launch provider–they’ve been nothing short of being responsive and helpful every step of the way since we signed the launch services agreement earlier this year.”

The ALTAIR Pathfinder was largely developed in order to test and demonstrate “next-generation hardware and software technologies”, which include additive manufacturing, advanced avionics, power systems, and more. These new technologies have opened up the possibility for new types of missions in space. That is, technologies such as 3D printing in space are helping to overcome certain challenges that previously existed, such as expensive costs of shipping parts into space, schedule limitations, and technology unavailability.

With its recent flight qualification, the ALTAIR Pathfinder could mark big advancements for new space technologies. As Paul Swanson, Millennium Space’s LEO (low-earth-orbit) constellations program manager explained, “This flight qualification of our ALTAIR™ spacecraft represents a key milestone in providing low-risk and very high-platform performance coupled with affordability as the company transitions to full-scale manufacturing of our ALTAIR™ product line and anticipated ALTAIR™ constellations.”

He continues: “Our manufacturing and production plan is in place to deliver hundreds of these vehicles each year. We have taken great measures to ensure that our spacecraft will work as designed through a series of environmental and functional tests culminating in our Pre-Ship Readiness Review and decision to ship the vehicle this week. As we transition to high-volume production of these vehicles in our state-of-the-art spacecraft factory, ALTAIR™ provides the underpinnings to support resiliency, affordability, persistence and high-tech refresh, thereby enabling tailored constellations fielded quickly, effectively and affordably.”

Founded in 2001, Millennium Space Systems has continually proposed and developed innovative and alternative solutions to the aerospace industry’s many challenges. Often working with the Department of Defense, NASA, and various commercial clients, Millennium Space Systems hopes to further advance new technologies, such as additive manufacturing, within space with the upcoming launch of its ALTAIR Pathfinder satellite.

Final preparation of the ALTAIR Pathfinder

Posted in 3D Printing Application

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Yeehaw 3D Printer review – The Gadgeteer – The Gadgeteer


December 20, 2016 Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Google+ Product Reviews


I’ve been interested in 3D printers for a long time but the price and complexity of creating models kept me from buying one. In the last couple of years, the price of 3D printers has come down to a level that ordinary people can afford, but I’m not sure the complexity issue has been changed much… at least until now. The Yeehaw 3D printer, which is currently seeking funding on Indiegogo, has been designed with kids in mind for safety and ease of use. Let’s take a closure look.

What is it?

The Yeehaw 3D printer is a 3D printer made especially for kids. It is controlled with a mobile app or web browser and has safety features take me this printer suitable for kids and adults like me who know nothing at all about 3D printers.

Setup

The Yeehaw 3D printer comes completely assembled as you see it above. It has no buttons or switches.

When I first took the 21.25 x 13.5 inch 3D printer out of the box and set it upright on a table, it wobbled. It took me a few seconds to realize that there was a magnetic base plate attached to the bottom.

The plastic base plate actually goes inside the printer and is what the models are printed on.

The door on the front of the printer opens easily so that the base plate can be positioned under the print head.

Once positioned, the next step is to install the Yeehaw app on an iOS or Android device and calibrate the print head. The app will provide step by step instructions on how to do this. Calibrating a 3D printer might sound a little scary, but it’s easy. All you really need is a sheet of typing paper and the ability to follow instructions. Calibrating the print head will make sure that it’s at the correct height above the base plate so that printed models will “stick” to the plate as the first layers are being printed. The calibration process has you place a sheet of paper on the base plate and then adjust the height of the print head so that the paper can just barely move when the head is touching the paper. You do this at four points on the base plate and then you’re done.

The next step is to load the spool of filament. I was sent a spool of white filament that reminded me of a huge spool of weed eater string.

The Yeehaw 3D printer uses PLA plastic filament which stands for polylactic acid. It’s made from renewable resources like corn starch, tapioca roots, or sugarcane.  The Yeehaw printer uses 1.75mm PLA which is a standard size that is available in a variety of colors and is priced around $30 for a spool like you see above.

Loading the PLA in the Yeehaw printer is very easy. It loads from the top of the printer and just requires that you first power on the printer using the included AC adapter. After the printer boots up, you can remove the top cover, and feed the end of the PLA into the small hole until the printer grabs the end of the filament and pulls it in the rest of the way toward the nozzle.

Then you just set the PLA spool in the tray…

And place the lid back on top of the printer. The whole process is quick and easy which is perfect for kids and tech challenged adults.

We’re now ready to print our first 3D model!

Printing models

Printing a 3D model is done through the Yeehaw mobile app or the web browser. Both methods look almost identical so I’ve just attached images from the web app.

The app has a library of models that are ready to print. I chose the MD Soldier model.

Once the app transfers the model to the printer wirelessly using WiFi, printing begins.

See it in action

The Yeehaw printer makes noise as it prints, so you would probably not want to place it in the same room where you watch TV or sleep. The top of the printer also has LEDs that light up in different colors as a status indicator.

Depending on the model, it can take quite a while for a print to complete. The MD Soldier that I printed took several hours. I started printing it around 4pm one afternoon and it was still printing when I went to bed at 9:30pm.

But when I check the next morning it was done! I removed the base tray from the printer and found that the model was really stuck to the plate. After some flexing, it popped off.

But some residue of the print remained on the base plate. I was not able to scrape all the PLA material off the base plate even when I tried using an Xacto knife. I really think the base plate should be made of glass instead of plastic to keep this from happening.

Here’s the finished model. You will notice the extra material under the hands and beard and between the legs. This material is needed in order to provide a base to print from because you can’t just print the bottom of the hand if it’s hanging out in space.

The extra material snaps off pretty easily, revealing the finished model. Too bad the Yeehaw doesn’t have the ability to print from multiple spools of PLA so that different colors could be used in one model. But it’s still really cool. The head even rotates!

The Yeehaw library has a growing selection of models that are ready to print, but you can also create your own simple models using the 3D builder feature in the app. I say simple models because you use blocks to build the model on a grid. Remember that the Yeehaw has been designed for kids, so that’s why the building feature is so basic and simple.

My first try at making my own model didn’t work out too well. I thought it would be fun to make a Christmas tree. Festive right?

But I wasn’t thinking correctly when I created it. Remember that extra material under the soldier’s hands and beard? I didn’t take that into consideration when I created the tree. So when it came time to start printing the first layer of the tree, the filament had nothing to stick to and just started dribbling around the tree’s base. Oops!

My second try creating a model was a flat smiley face and it was more successful.

The app also allows you to import existing STL files. I tried this with an STL file that I found on Thingverse. The STL file appeared to import successfully, but the app’s web interface popped up a message in Chinese that I couldn’t translate. No matter what I tried, I wasn’t able to print an imported STL file. I think this feature is still in beta so I hope that the kinks will be ironed out soon.

Final thoughts

The Yeehaw 3D printer was my first experience using a 3D printer and now I’m hooked. This printer is great for kids because it’s easy to use and is safe. Printing will immediately stop when you open the door while it’s printing and the nozzle lift out of the way so you won’t get burnt.

Although the application’s current library of ready to print models is small, the ability to import existing STL model files (when that feature actually works) will make this printer useful for adults as well as kids.

I did ask the Yeehaw team about using this printer with other applications in case Yeehaw goes out of business. They told me that you can connect to printer Wi-Fi and use the URL: http://192.168.100.1. I didn’t get a chance to test this because I don’t know what other applications are available. I do plan to test this at some point and will do an update when I do.

For $249, the Yeehaw printer is a fun an inexpensive way to take a first step into 3D printing for kids and those of us who are still kids in our minds.

The Yeehaw Indiegogo project has already met their funding goal and ends in 4 days. Orders are shipping now.

Source: The sample for this review was provided by Yeehaw. Please visit their site for more info and order one through Indiegogo.

Product Information

Price: $249
Manufacturer: Yeehaw
Retailer: Indiegogo
Pros:
  • Easy to use for kids and adults
  • Controlled through an app or web browser
  • 3D building feature lets you create simple block models
Cons:
  • Filament sticks to the plastic base plate. Needs to be glass.
  • Importing STL files into web app does not work yet

I’ve been interested in 3D printers for a long time but the price and complexity of creating models kept me from buying one. In the last couple of years, the price of 3D printers has come down to a level that ordinary people can afford, but I’m not sure the complexity issue has been changed much… at least until now. The Yeehaw 3D printer, which is currently seeking funding on Indiegogo, has been designed with kids in mind for safety and ease of use. Let’s take a closure look.

What is it?

The Yeehaw 3D printer is a 3D printer made especially for kids. It is controlled with a mobile app or web browser and has safety features take me this printer suitable for kids and adults like me who know nothing at all about 3D printers.

Setup

The Yeehaw 3D printer comes completely assembled as you see it above. It has no buttons or switches.

When I first took the 21.25 x 13.5 inch 3D printer out of the box and set it upright on a table, it wobbled. It took me a few seconds to realize that there was a magnetic base plate attached to the bottom.

The plastic base plate actually goes inside the printer and is what the models are printed on.

The door on the front of the printer opens easily so that the base plate can be positioned under the print head.

Once positioned, the next step is to install the Yeehaw app on an iOS or Android device and calibrate the print head. The app will provide step by step instructions on how to do this. Calibrating a 3D printer might sound a little scary, but it’s easy. All you really need is a sheet of typing paper and the ability to follow instructions. Calibrating the print head will make sure that it’s at the correct height above the base plate so that printed models will “stick” to the plate as the first layers are being printed. The calibration process has you place a sheet of paper on the base plate and then adjust the height of the print head so that the paper can just barely move when the head is touching the paper. You do this at four points on the base plate and then you’re done.

The next step is to load the spool of filament. I was sent a spool of white filament that reminded me of a huge spool of weed eater string.

The Yeehaw 3D printer uses PLA plastic filament which stands for polylactic acid. It’s made from renewable resources like corn starch, tapioca roots, or sugarcane.  The Yeehaw printer uses 1.75mm PLA which is a standard size that is available in a variety of colors and is priced around $30 for a spool like you see above.

Loading the PLA in the Yeehaw printer is very easy. It loads from the top of the printer and just requires that you first power on the printer using the included AC adapter. After the printer boots up, you can remove the top cover, and feed the end of the PLA into the small hole until the printer grabs the end of the filament and pulls it in the rest of the way toward the nozzle.

Then you just set the PLA spool in the tray…

And place the lid back on top of the printer. The whole process is quick and easy which is perfect for kids and tech challenged adults.

We’re now ready to print our first 3D model!

Printing models

Printing a 3D model is done through the Yeehaw mobile app or the web browser. Both methods look almost identical so I’ve just attached images from the web app.

The app has a library of models that are ready to print. I chose the MD Soldier model.

Once the app transfers the model to the printer wirelessly using WiFi, printing begins.

See it in action

The Yeehaw printer makes noise as it prints, so you would probably not want to place it in the same room where you watch TV or sleep. The top of the printer also has LEDs that light up in different colors as a status indicator.

Depending on the model, it can take quite a while for a print to complete. The MD Soldier that I printed took several hours. I started printing it around 4pm one afternoon and it was still printing when I went to bed at 9:30pm.

But when I check the next morning it was done! I removed the base tray from the printer and found that the model was really stuck to the plate. After some flexing, it popped off.

But some residue of the print remained on the base plate. I was not able to scrape all the PLA material off the base plate even when I tried using an Xacto knife. I really think the base plate should be made of glass instead of plastic to keep this from happening.

Here’s the finished model. You will notice the extra material under the hands and beard and between the legs. This material is needed in order to provide a base to print from because you can’t just print the bottom of the hand if it’s hanging out in space.

The extra material snaps off pretty easily, revealing the finished model. Too bad the Yeehaw doesn’t have the ability to print from multiple spools of PLA so that different colors could be used in one model. But it’s still really cool. The head even rotates!

The Yeehaw library has a growing selection of models that are ready to print, but you can also create your own simple models using the 3D builder feature in the app. I say simple models because you use blocks to build the model on a grid. Remember that the Yeehaw has been designed for kids, so that’s why the building feature is so basic and simple.

My first try at making my own model didn’t work out too well. I thought it would be fun to make a Christmas tree. Festive right?

But I wasn’t thinking correctly when I created it. Remember that extra material under the soldier’s hands and beard? I didn’t take that into consideration when I created the tree. So when it came time to start printing the first layer of the tree, the filament had nothing to stick to and just started dribbling around the tree’s base. Oops!

My second try creating a model was a flat smiley face and it was more successful.

The app also allows you to import existing STL files. I tried this with an STL file that I found on Thingverse. The STL file appeared to import successfully, but the app’s web interface popped up a message in Chinese that I couldn’t translate. No matter what I tried, I wasn’t able to print an imported STL file. I think this feature is still in beta so I hope that the kinks will be ironed out soon.

Final thoughts

The Yeehaw 3D printer was my first experience using a 3D printer and now I’m hooked. This printer is great for kids because it’s easy to use and is safe. Printing will immediately stop when you open the door while it’s printing and the nozzle lift out of the way so you won’t get burnt.

Although the application’s current library of ready to print models is small, the ability to import existing STL model files (when that feature actually works) will make this printer useful for adults as well as kids.

I did ask the Yeehaw team about using this printer with other applications in case Yeehaw goes out of business. They told me that you can connect to printer Wi-Fi and use the URL: http://192.168.100.1. I didn’t get a chance to test this because I don’t know what other applications are available. I do plan to test this at some point and will do an update when I do.

For $249, the Yeehaw printer is a fun an inexpensive way to take a first step into 3D printing for kids and those of us who are still kids in our minds.

The Yeehaw Indiegogo project has already met their funding goal and ends in 4 days. Orders are shipping now.

Source: The sample for this review was provided by Yeehaw. Please visit their site for more info and order one through Indiegogo.

Product Information

Price: $249
Manufacturer: Yeehaw
Retailer: Indiegogo
Pros:
  • Easy to use for kids and adults
  • Controlled through an app or web browser
  • 3D building feature lets you create simple block models
Cons:
  • Filament sticks to the plastic base plate. Needs to be glass.
  • Importing STL files into web app does not work yet

Source from..

Rhino Smart: Extruder Jam Detector for 3D printers


December 20, 2016 Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Google+ Press Release


Never worry about dry running your 3D printer again. RhinoSmart will pause the print if printer runs out of filament or there is a jam
Backers: 8
Average Daily Pledges: $203 CAD
Average Pledge Per Backer: $51 CAD

Funding: $405 CAD of $5,000 CAD
Dates: Dec 19th -> Feb 1st (44 days)
Project By: MONIRAD ROBOTICS INC.

Never worry about dry running your 3D printer again. RhinoSmart will pause the print if printer runs out of filament or there is a jam
Backers: 8
Average Daily Pledges: $203 CAD
Average Pledge Per Backer: $51 CAD

Funding: $405 CAD of $5,000 CAD
Dates: Dec 19th -> Feb 1st (44 days)
Project By: MONIRAD ROBOTICS INC.

Source from..

Space-Inspired 3D Printed Vortex Dress Is From Another Planet


December 20, 2016 Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Google+ all3dp.com


After launching a Kickstarter campaign last year, fashion designer Laura Thapthimkuna has finally completed her 3D printed Vortex Dress.

In the fashion industry, the emergence of 3D printing has transformed the nature of how clothing and accessories are designed and created. Not only has the technology allowed fashion designers to produce clothing with specified dimensions, it has also enabled them to create garments with complex and otherworldly designs.

Back in September 2015, US-based fashion designer and design engineer Laura Thapthimkuna launched a Kickstarter campaign to help fund her space-inspired 3D printed Vortex Dress. The ambitious project was Thapthimkuna’s first attempt at creating a garment entirely with 3D printing technology. The fashion designer ultimately decided that it was the best production method to successfully tackle the project due to the sheer size and supernatural design of the dress.

The idea for the Vortex Dress stemmed from Thapthimkuna’s use of biomorphic funnel-like shapes. The complex design process for the garment took the fashion designer over a year to complete. After the 2D sketches of the dress were complete, the fashion designer had them transformed into printable files through 3D modeling software like ZBrush and Maya.

vortex dress

vortex dress

i.materialise Helps Bring the Vortex Dress Down to Earth

In need of 3D printing service bureau capable of handling such an intricate and large-scale project, Thapthimkuna turned to the Belgium-based company i.materialise to help bring her space-inspired Vortex Dress to life. She decided to have the garment printed in I.materialise’s Paintable Resin material, which provided her gigantic print with a smooth surface that could be easily colored and post-processed.

After the 3D printing process was complete, the Vortex Dress was painted with a black clear coat. Aside from the advanced alien-like structure of the 3D printed dress, the most impressive part of the project is its massive size, measuring over 36 inches in height and up to 25.4 inches wide.

Needless to say, this complex 3D printed Vortex Dress would have been extremely difficult — perhaps impossible — to accomplish with traditional production techniques. But still, it wasn’t easy for the fashion designer to let go and let the 3D printer handle the work for her. According to Thapthimkuna, this was one of the more difficult aspects of creating the Vortex Dress via 3D printing technology

“Learning to let go of the notion that I have to do everything myself was challenging for me initially. As an artist I’ve always done everything myself from start to finish, with 3D printing I need to work with others and let them interpret my vision to an extent, which turned out to be very rewarding in the end,” she said.

vortex dress

vortex dress

After launching a Kickstarter campaign last year, fashion designer Laura Thapthimkuna has finally completed her 3D printed Vortex Dress.

In the fashion industry, the emergence of 3D printing has transformed the nature of how clothing and accessories are designed and created. Not only has the technology allowed fashion designers to produce clothing with specified dimensions, it has also enabled them to create garments with complex and otherworldly designs.

Back in September 2015, US-based fashion designer and design engineer Laura Thapthimkuna launched a Kickstarter campaign to help fund her space-inspired 3D printed Vortex Dress. The ambitious project was Thapthimkuna’s first attempt at creating a garment entirely with 3D printing technology. The fashion designer ultimately decided that it was the best production method to successfully tackle the project due to the sheer size and supernatural design of the dress.

The idea for the Vortex Dress stemmed from Thapthimkuna’s use of biomorphic funnel-like shapes. The complex design process for the garment took the fashion designer over a year to complete. After the 2D sketches of the dress were complete, the fashion designer had them transformed into printable files through 3D modeling software like ZBrush and Maya.

vortex dress

vortex dress

i.materialise Helps Bring the Vortex Dress Down to Earth

In need of 3D printing service bureau capable of handling such an intricate and large-scale project, Thapthimkuna turned to the Belgium-based company i.materialise to help bring her space-inspired Vortex Dress to life. She decided to have the garment printed in I.materialise’s Paintable Resin material, which provided her gigantic print with a smooth surface that could be easily colored and post-processed.

After the 3D printing process was complete, the Vortex Dress was painted with a black clear coat. Aside from the advanced alien-like structure of the 3D printed dress, the most impressive part of the project is its massive size, measuring over 36 inches in height and up to 25.4 inches wide.

Needless to say, this complex 3D printed Vortex Dress would have been extremely difficult — perhaps impossible — to accomplish with traditional production techniques. But still, it wasn’t easy for the fashion designer to let go and let the 3D printer handle the work for her. According to Thapthimkuna, this was one of the more difficult aspects of creating the Vortex Dress via 3D printing technology

“Learning to let go of the notion that I have to do everything myself was challenging for me initially. As an artist I’ve always done everything myself from start to finish, with 3D printing I need to work with others and let them interpret my vision to an extent, which turned out to be very rewarding in the end,” she said.

vortex dress

vortex dress

Source from..

3D Print a Mini Commodore PET with A Working LED Screen

3d_printing_pet-hero-centered

How To Build this Miniature 3D Printed PET

Like the real thing, the 3D printed PET doesn’t consist of many components. First, you 3D print the case, preferably in beige or white for the case, and a dark brown for the keyboard and screen. You can download all the files from

Thingiverse and start printing. Some of the parts will be glued together, others will just snap in place.

The parts list for this project is short. You need a LED matrix (9 x 16), a LED matrix driver, an Arduino Feather MO Basic Proto, a battery, a switch, glue, wires and some screws. You should have some soldering experience, but all in all, it’s a project even beginners can handle.

3d_printing_pet-banana

3d_printing_pet-banana

You’ll find the parts list and detailed instructions at

Adafruit.

Of course, you can program the Arduino Feather MO microcontroller to display the messages you want. If you don’t understand or write code, don’t worry: You can upload prewritten code and start experimenting from there.

(Source:

Adafruit)

Source from..

32 Great Online 3D Printing Services (To Get It 3D Printed)


December 20, 2016 Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Google+ all3dp.com


Looking for the best online 3D printing service? Here are 33 great online 3D printing services for consumer and small business.

Try: All3DP’s 3D Online Printing Service – Professional 3D Printing for the Best Price!

An online 3D printing service is a company that will professionally print objects on your behalf. It’s a smart business model that leverages economies of scale; large, industrial 3D printers are used to fabricate hundreds and thousands of small, custom print jobs for individual customers. You can either upload your models, or you can choose from a range of models already available.

What are the benefits of using an online 3D printing service, as opposed to owning a 3D printer of your own? Let’s begin with the object. You can send scans, photographs, STL files or even physical items to be fabricated using a 3D printer. You can choose any number of materials and colors for your item, plus typography and size where relevant (e.g. for an engagement ring), so the customization options are endless.

Secondly, there’s the convenience. It’s not just about having your item sent to you in the post, securely tracked and packaged (though that’s nice too). It’s also the fact that you don’t have to worry about the quality control of your objects, as you might with a 3D printer at home. The logistics of printing your order are handled by professionals, to an optimal standard, and typically fulfilled within a reasonable time-frame.

In order to give you an idea of the price range found between B2B and B2C online 3d printing services, we have requested two quotes in common configurations from each: 1) SLS (Selective Laser Sintering) in Nylon and 2) FDM (Fused deposition modeling) in PLA. All prices are USD. The model requested was the renowned 3DBenchy. Some professional B2B 3D printing services didn’t reply to our request, as producing starts for them at a different level. We’ve noted this in the description accordingly.

Here are 32 great online 3D printing services listed in according to their popularity.

Note: The most popular online 3D printing services Shapeways, i.materialise and Sculpteo can be accessed via ALL3DP’s 3D Printing Service, where the actual prices can be compared in real-time.

Have we missed your favorite online 3D printing service? Tell us in the comments, and we’ll add them in a future update.

32 Great Online 3D Printing Services

You can sort and search through each column of this table or skip it and jump to the detailed list.

3D Printing Service Shipping Quotes Type Materials 3D Printing Methods Visitors
3D Hubs Worldwide Instant B2C / B2B Metal, Polypropylene, Paper, Resin, Stone, Thermoplastic, Wax FDM, Jetting, Metal Sintering, Paper, PolyJetting, SLA, SLS, CFF, Wax Casting ★★★
i.materialise Worldwide Instant B2C / B2B Ceramic, Metal, Resin, Thermoplastic, Wood Casting, CeramicJet, Colorjet, DMLS, FDM, Indirect Metal Printing, Polyjet, SLS, SLA ★★★
Sculpteo Worldwide Instant B2C / B2B Ceramic, Fullcolor, Metal, Resin, Thermoplastic, Wax Casting, CLIP, ColorJet, SLA, DMLS, FDM, SLS ★★★
Shapeways Worldwide Instant B2C / B2B Ceramic, Metal, Plastic, Sandstone, Wax SLS, Binder Jet Steel, Wax casting ★★★
Fathom Worldwide Instant B2B Metals, Thermoplastics, Resins, Urethanes, Silicones FDM, PolyJet, SLA, SLS ★★
iMakr Worldwide 1 Day B2C Resin, Thermoplastic FDM, SLA ★★
MakeXYZ Worldwide Instant B2C Nylon, Resin, Thermoplastic FDM, SLA ★★
Materialise OnSite Worldwide Instant B2B Glass, Metal, Multicolor, Resin, Thermoplastic Colorjet, DMLS, FDM, Polyjet, SLA, SLA ★★
Ponoko Worldwide Instant B2C / B2B Metal, Thermoplastic ColorJet, FDM, SLS ★★
Protolabs Worldwide Instant B2B Metal, Nylon, Thermoplastic DMLS, SLA, SLS ★★
Quickparts Worldwide Instant B2B Metal, Nylon, Resin, Thermoplastic, Wax ColorJet, CNC, DMLS, MultiJet, SLA, SLS ★★
StrataSys Direct Worldwide Instant B2B Acrylic, Ceramic, Foam, Metal, Thermoplastic, Wax CNC, DMLS, FDM, LS, PolyJet, SLS, Urethane Casting ★★
Trinckle Worldwide Instant B2C / B2B Metal, Multicolor, Resin, Thermoplastic ColorJet, FDM, SLA, SLS, Wax casting ★★
Voodoo Manufacturing Worldwide Instant B2C/B2B Thermoplastic FDM ★★
StarPrototype Worldwide 1 Day B2C/B2B Metal, Thermoplastic DMLM, SLA ★★
3Diligent Worldwide 1 Day B2C / B2B Metal, Nylon, Resin, Thermoplastic DMLS, EBM, FDM, Polyjet, SLA, SLM, SLS
3D Print-Au US, UK, NZ, TH Instant B2C Nylon SLS
Beta-Prototypes Worldwide 1 Day B2B Metal, Resin, Thermoplastic FDM, SLA, SLS
HK3DPrint Worldwide Instant B2B Fullcolor, Nylon SLS
Incept3D Worldwide 1 Day B2B Metal, Resin, Thermoplastic FDM, SLA, DMLS
Kraftwurx Worldwide Instant B2C Ceramic, Metal, Paper, Resin, Stone, Thermoplastic, Wax Casting, DMLS, FDM, SLA, SLS
MeltWerk Europe Instant B2C / B2B Plastic SLS
Rapid3DParts N/A 2 Days B2B Thermoplastic ColorJet, PolyJet, SHS, SLS
RapidCrafting Worldwide 1 Day B2C / B2B Ceramic, Fullcolor, Metal, Resin, Thermoplastic Colorjet, DMLS, FDM, SLA, SLS
Shapetizer N/A Instant B2C Resin, Polyamide, precious Metal Casting, SLA
WhiteClouds N/A N/A B2B Fullcolor, Metal, Plastic ColorJet, MJP, SLA, DMP, SLS
X3D Print Worldwide Instant B2B Resin SLA
3D Printing Ally N/A Instant B2C/B2B Ceramic, Fullcolor, Nylon, Polycarbonate, Resin, Thermoplastic, Wax Color Jet Printing, FDM, Multijet Printing, SLA, SLS
Iannone 3D Worldwide N/A B2B Nylon, Thermoplastic, Wax FDM, Wax printing
BuildParts Worldwide Instant B2C/B2B Metal, Resin, Thermoplastic CLIP, FDM, Polyjet, SLA, SLS, Urethane Casting
PartSnap Worldwide Instant B2B Resin, Thermoplastic FDM, FFF, PolyJet
Rapid3D N/A 2 Days B2C / B2B Resin SLA

Online 3D Printing Service #1: 3D Hubs

3D Hubs Best 3D Printing Service

3D Hubs Best 3D Printing Service

Price for Benchy: from $25.66 (Nylon, SLS), from $8.60 (PLA, FDM)

Quotes: Instant Quote

Type of 3D Printing Service: B2C / B2B

Materials: Metal, Polypropylene, Paper, Resin, Stone, Thermoplastic, Wax

3D Printing Methods: FDM, Jetting, Metal Sintering, Paper, PolyJetting, SLA, SLS, CFF, Wax Casting

Formats: stl, obj

Shipping: Worldwide (UPS, FedEx, DHL and more, depends on chosen Hub), pickup is free

Payment: Credit Card, Paypal, and some local payment services

Via the 3D Hubs, you can search for individuals and businesses that offer 3D printing services in your area, upload your STL file for an instant estimate, and connect with them directly to get the job done. The online 3D printing service also allows you to filter by materials, by user rating, by distance, and multiple other factors. Regardless of the type of item you want to have printed, there’s likely someone in your vicinity who can print it for you. A considerable number of materials can be printed in industrial quality, these are marked as »HD« in the search field.

(Visit 3D Hubs)

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Online 3D Printing Service #2: i.materialise

imaterialise 3d printing service

imaterialise 3d printing service

Price for Benchy: $14.10 (Nylon, SLS), N/A (PLA, FDM)

Quotes: Instant Quote

Type of 3D Printing Service: B2C / B2B

Materials: Ceramic, Metal, Resin, Thermoplastic, Wood

3D Printing Methods: Casting, CeramicJet, Colorjet, DMLS, FDM, Indirect Metal Printing, Polyjet, SLS, SLA

Formats: stl, obj, wrl, skp, dae, 3mf, 3ds, igs, model, 3dm, fbx, ply, magics, mgx, x3d, stp, step, prt, matpart

Shipping: Worldwide (UPS), lead time: up to 10 days (standard), 48 hours (express)

Payment: Credit Card, PayPal

Materialise is a company that works with industrial clients to produce prototypes and 3D printed products. But for the general public and individual designers, Materialise offers an online 3D printing service called i.materialise. Like Shapeways, the online 3D printing service allows anyone to upload their 3D designs and have them printed out. Once an object has been uploaded and successfully printed, a designer can offer it for sale either via the gallery on the i.materalise online store, or embedded on their website.

Note: i.materialise can also be accessed via ALL3DP’s 3D Printing Service, where the actual prices can be compared to Shapeways and Scuplteo in real-time.

(Visit i.materialise)

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Online 3D Printing Service #3: Sculpteo

sculpteo best 3d printing service

sculpteo best 3d printing service

Price for Benchy: $22.70 (Nylon, SLS), N/A (PLA, FDM)

Quotes: Instant Quote

Type of 3D Printing Service: B2C / B2B

Materials: Ceramic, Fullcolor, Metal, Resin, Thermoplastic, Wax

3D Printing Methods: Casting, CLIP, ColorJet, SLA, DMLS, FDM, SLS

Formats: stl, obj, skp, off, ply, kmz, 3ds, ac3d, ipt, dae, md2/md3, q3o, cob, dxf, lwo, iges, stp, vrml, scad, zip, rar, tgz, carpart, catproduct, cgr, sldprt, sldasm, iges, igs, sat, 3dm, 3mf, prc, u3d, x_t

Shipping: Worldwide (colissimo 2 days, UPS 1-2 days and others)

Payment: Credit Card, Debit Card, PayPal

Like Shapeways and i.materialise, Sculpteo is an online 3D printing service that allows anyone to upload 3D models and have them fabricated in a wide variety of materials. In keeping with its competitors, Sculpteo also allows individuals and professionals to open up an online storefront and sell their designs to the public. Sculpteo’s stable of printers includes high-end machines by 3D Systems, EOS, Stratasys, and ZCorp. Its extensive technical documentation will help you detect design flaws and choose the right material for your project.

Note: Sculpteo can also be accessed via ALL3DP’s 3D Printing Service, where the actual prices can be compared to Shapeways and i.materialise in real-time.

(Visit Sculpteo)

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Online 3D Printing Service #4: Shapeways

shapeways best 3d printing service

shapeways best 3d printing service

Price for Benchy: $13.84 (Nylon, SLS), N/A (PLA, FDM)

Quotes: Instant Quote

Type of 3D Printing Service: B2C / B2B

Materials: Ceramic, Metal, Plastic, Sandstone, Wax

3D Printing Methods: SLS, Binder Jet Steel, Wax casting

Formats: stl, obj, x3d, dae, vrml

Shipping: Worldwide (DHL, UPS, USPS), 1-9 days

Payment: Credit Card, PayPal, Bank Transfer

World’s most popular online 3D printing service Shapeways offers two services. On the consumer side, you can choose from a broad array of professionally designed items, customize them and have them printed to your specifications. Similar to other 3D printing services, Shapeways offers storefronts to designers to sell and print their work. Shapeways is also suitable for rapid prototyping – customers will profit from industrial grade printers (EOS, 3D Systems) and dedicated technical support.

Note: Shapeways can also be accessed via ALL3DP’s 3D Printing Service, where the actual prices can be compared to i.materialise and Scuplteo in real-time.

(Visit Shapeways)

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Online 3D Printing Service #5: Fathom

Source: Fathom

Source: Fathom

Price for Benchy: $150 minimum order total (Nylon, SLS), N/A (PLA, FDM)

Quotes: Instant Quote, (for Advanced Services Request Form)

Type of 3D Printing Service: B2B

Materials: Metals, Thermoplastics, Resins, Urethanes, Silicones

3D Printing Methods: FDM, PolyJet, SLA, SLS, (Advanced Services: CNC Machining, Urethane casting, DMLS printing, Rapid Injection Molding, Low-Volume Production, Model Finishing)

Formats: stl, 3dm, 3ds, model, exp, dlv, dlv3, catpart, iges, igs, sld, sldprt, step, stp, x_t, prt, ply, zcp, vda, wrl, vrml, skp, sat, jt, dxf, fbx, dae, zpr, obj

Shipping: 1-4 days Lead Time, Worldwide (FedEx and local couriers chosen by the customer)

Payment: Credit Card

Oakland-based online 3D printing service Fathom offers a platform called SmartQuote that caters to the needs of prototyping. The company boasts a wide array of Stratasys printers and sophisticated finishing services, that include color, texture, artwork and assembly. The website features extensive documentation of printing methods and materials. For production purposes, Fathom offers advanced services that extend the range of printing methods (see above). In addition to the online 3D printing service, Fathom is also a reseller for Stratasys printers and lends its expertise in engineering and production to customers.

(Visit Fathom)

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Online 3D Printing Service #6: iMakr

Source: iMakr

Source: iMakr

Price for Benchy: N/A (Nylon, SLS), $49.50 (PLA, FDM)

Quotes: Request Form, 1 Day Response Time

Type of 3D Printing Service: B2C

Materials: Resin, Thermoplastic

3D Printing Methods: FDM, SLA

Formats: stl, obj

Shipping: Worldwide (courier service not specified, didn’t reply to our request for information), 3-5 Days Lead Time, store pick-up possible

Payment: Cash, Credit Card, Debit Card, PayPal, Wire Transfer

iMakr runs two stores in London and New York. On the website this company offers the full range of its expertise: the online 3D printing service makes up only a fraction of iMakr’s business. It also sells FDM and SLA printers from a multitude of manufacturers, as well as 3D scanners. iMakr is set apart from its competitors by its 3D printer renting service. If you are new to the world of 3D printing, you can employ its consulting, training and maintenance services. Assembly and finishing services are available on request.

(Visit iMakr)

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Online 3D Printing Service #7: MakeXYZ

Source: MakeXYZ

Source: MakeXYZ

Price for Benchy: $66.90 (Nylon, SLS), $18.90 (PLA, FDM)

Quotes: Instant Quote

Type of 3D Printing Service: B2C

Materials: Nylon, Resin, Thermoplastic

3D Printing Methods: FDM, SLA

Formats: stl, obj, zip, step, stp, iges, igs, 3ds, wrl

Shipping: Worldwide (UPS, USPS), 3-5 Days (Standard, free), Overnight Delivery Available (orders over $250 get upgraded for free)

Payment: Credit Card, PayPal

This online 3D printing service has a very clean, no-nonsense website. The convenient instant quotation system does not compel you to register. Similar to 3D Hubs, you can browse for 3D printers in your area or price range. For a fee MakeXYZ will design a 3D printable model for you within 48 hours and according to your description.

(Visit MakeXYZ)

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Sourece: Materialise OnSite

Sourece: Materialise OnSite

Price for Benchy: covered by $100 minimum order value (Nylon, SLS), covered by $100 minimum order value (PLA, FDM)

Quotes: Instant Quote

Type of 3D Printing Service: B2B

Materials: Glass, Metal, Multicolor, Resin, Thermoplastic

3D Printing Methods: Colorjet, DMLS, FDM, Polyjet, SLA, SLA

Formats: stl, 3ds, 3dm, obj, wrl, matpart, stp, skp, sldprt, step, catpart, iges, model, mxp, mgx

Shipping: Worldwide (UPS) standard free, NextDay service available for SLA

Payment: Materialisie OnSite didn’t reply to our request for information.

OnSite is Materialise’s online 3D printing service for industrial clients. Accordingly, you will find a wide range of printing technologies, materials, and finishes at your disposal. OnSite grants 10% discount for online orders.

(Visit Materialise OnSite)

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Online 3D Printing Service #9: Ponoko

ponoko best 3d printing service

ponoko best 3d printing service

Price for Benchy: N/A (Nylon, SLS), N/A (PLA, FDM)

Quotes: Instant Quote

Type of 3D Printing Service: B2C / B2B

Materials: Metal, Thermoplastic

3D Printing Methods: ColorJet, FDM, SLS

Formats: stl, dae, vrml

Shipping: Worldwide (UPS and USPS), 1-7 days

Payment: PayPal

Ponoko provides online 3D printing services plus laser etching and engraving too. The company has designers, 3D printers and robots on hand, and pricing starts as low at $5 depending on what needs printing and the materials you choose. Ponoko also offers same-day shipping if you order before a cut-off point. In theory, that means it’s possible to convert your STL or CAD files into actual physical products and have them in your hands within the space of a day. Ponoko’s professional 3D printers are from 3D Systems and ZCorp. Ponoko 3D prints in metal and thermoplastic only – the price for a Benchy in ABS, FDM is $38.78.

(Visit Ponoko)

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Online 3D Printing Service #10: Protolabs

Source: ProtoLabs

Source: ProtoLabs

Price for Benchy: $81.90 (Nylon, SLS), N/A (PLA, FDM)

Quotes: Instant Quote

Type of 3D Printing Service: B2B

Materials: Metal, Nylon, Thermoplastic

3D Printing Methods: DMLS, SLA, SLS

Formats: stl, sldprt, prt, igs, stp, sat, x_t, x_b

Shipping: Worldwide (courier service not specified, didn’t reply to our request for information), lead time 1-7 days

Payment: Invoice, PayPal

With 500 machines placed around the globe, Protolabs services industries worldwide. The website of this online 3D printing service features documentation on printing technology, materials, and a glossary.

(Visit Protolabs)

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Online 3D Printing Service #11: Quickparts

Source: 3D Systems

Source: 3D Systems

Price for Benchy: $84.00 (Nylon, SLS), N/A (PLA, FDM)

Quotes: Instant Quote

Type of 3D Printing Service: B2B

Materials: Metal, Nylon, Resin, Thermoplastic, Wax

3D Printing Methods: ColorJet, CNC, DMLS, MultiJet, SLA, SLS

Formats: stl, sldprt, prt, ipt, igs, stp, step, doc, xls, pdf, dwg, txt, iges, dxf, jpg, x_t, x_b, sat, eprt, tif, wrl, catpart, zip

Shipping: Worldwide (courier service not specified), lead time 3-5 days

Payment: Quickparts didn’t reply to our request for information.

Quickparts is a high-quality online 3D printing service offered by 3D Systems, a leading manufacturer of industrial printers. Here you can take your pick from 3D System’s broad array of printers and materials. Extensive technical documentation will help you detect design flaws and choose the right material for your project. This online 3D printing service is aimed at professionals in engineering, medicine, and industrial design.

(Visit Quickparts)

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Source: StrataSys

Source: StrataSys

Price for Benchy: $46 (Nylon, SLS), $133 (PLA, FDM)

Quotes: Instant Quote

Type of 3D Printing Service: B2B

Materials: Acrylic, Ceramic, Foam, Metal, Thermoplastic, Wax

3D Printing Methods: CNC, DMLS, FDM, LS, PolyJet, SLS, Urethane Casting

Formats: stl

Shipping: Worldwide (courier service not specified, depends on customer’s location)

Payment: StrataSys Direct didn’t reply to our request for information.

One of the leading manufacturers of industrial grade 3D printers, Stratasys is also offering a high-quality 3D printing service. Fittingly, Stratasys sports a dazzling assortment of materials, which are explained at length in the documentation. This online 3D printing service is aimed at professionals in engineering, medicine, and industrial design. A neat feature of its online quoting page is the ability to create and edit styles (consisting of the printing method, material, finishing and surface treatment) that can be applied to successive projects. Stratasys is also sharing its expertise with companies interested in switching to additive manufacturing.

(Visit Stratasys)

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Online 3D Printing Service #13: Trinckle

trinckle best 3d printing service

trinckle best 3d printing service

Price for Benchy: $20.45 (Nylon, SLS), N/A (PLA, FDM)

Quotes: Instant Quote

Type of 3D Printing Service: B2C / B2B

Materials: Metal, Multicolor, Resin, Thermoplastic

3D Printing Methods: ColorJet, FDM, SLA, SLS, Wax casting

Formats: stl, ply, 3ds, 3mf

Shipping: Worldwide (DHL), lead time: 8- 23 days (depending on material), express options available

Payment: Bank Transfer, PayPal

Trinckle is Meltwerk’s parent company that caters to the needs of engineering professionals. The online 3D printing service offers a marketplace to buy 3D printed goods, tools to check the structural integrity of your model (thereby saving time and money), plus detailed guides on the pros and cons of each material. Also, they accept commissions from small businesses and individuals alike. What sets Trinckle apart from other online 3D printing services, however, are their detailed corporate communications on the environmental impact. The Benchy costs $20.25 as ABS, FDM.

(Visit Trinckle)

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voodoo-manufacturing

voodoo-manufacturing

Price for Benchy: N/A (Nylon, SLS), $12.11 (PLA, FDM)

Quotes: Instant Quote

Type of Service: B2B/B2C

Materials: Thermoplastic

Printing methods: FDM

Formats: stl

Shipping: Worldwide (see below) US (Uber Rush, FedEx), Rush Production available

Payment: Credit Card

Voodoo Manufacturing is based in Brooklyn and lends its 3D printing services for individual prints as well as for large scale production. So far their portfolio has included projects such as printing off collectibles for popular TV shows and gear for a high-fashion show. All prints are made with a massive fleet of MakerBots. As of December 2016 Voodoo Manufacturing does not ship internationally for orders under $2.500.

(Visit Voodoo Manufacturing)

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Online 3D Printing Service #15: StarPrototype

starprototype

starprototype

Price for Benchy: N/A (Nylon, SLS), N/A (PLA, FDM)

Quotes: Request Form, 1 Day Response Time

Type of Service: B2B/B2C

Materials: Metal, Thermoplastic

Printing methods: DMLM, SLA

Formats: stl

Shipping: Worldwide (Fedex, DHL, UPS), 4-5 Days (including customs clearance)

Payment: TT, Paypal

StarPrototype offers a wide range of prototyping services for professionals and ambitious hobbyists. The website includes detailed information on the available technologies: Besides 3D printing, other techniques offered by this 3D online printing service are Plastic Mold Injection, CNC Machining, Pressure Die Casting and Vacuum Casting. The case studies are a worthwhile read and clearly demonstrate what you can achieve with this company by your side. The price for the Benchy is (ABS, SLA).

(Visit StarPrototype)

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Online 3D Printing Service #16: 3Diligent

3Diligent

3Diligent

Price for Benchy: from $49.70 (Nylon, SLS), from $63.50 (PLA, FDM)

Quotes: Request Form, 1 Day response time

Type of 3D Printing Service: B2C / B2B

Materials: Metal, Nylon, Resin, Thermoplastic

3D Printing Methods: DMLS, EBM, FDM, Polyjet, SLA, SLM, SLS

Formats: stl, stp, igs

Shipping: Worldwide (FedEx), lead time depends on vendor

Payment: Bank Transfer, Credit Card, PayPal, Purchase Order, Retainer

3Diligent offers two kinds of online 3D printing services: 3Diligent Direct, which features a custom selection of optimal printing partner by an expert. Confusingly, the second service, 3Diligent Marketplace is also divided into a free and a premium service: FREE: automatic analysis and allocation of printing provider. PREMIUM: access to »outstanding fabricators with professional and industrial equipment«.

When requesting a quote, you state your budget, select the material, the process and other requirements of your project. If you are unsure which material or process is suitable for your design, you can let the vendors decide. 3Diligent will then forward your bids by printing hubs to pick from them. The knowledge center provides concise information on printing methods and materials, as well as series of videos that explain the order process.

(Visit 3Diligent)

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Online 3D Printing Service #17: 3D Print-Au

Source: 3DPrint-AU

Source: 3DPrint-AU

Price for Benchy: $15.75 (Nylon, SLS), N/A (PLA, FDM)

Quotes: Instant Quote

Type of 3D Printing Service: B2C

Materials: Nylon

3D Printing Methods: SLS

Formats: stl

Shipping: Australia, New Zealand, Thailand, UK, and the US, Lead Time 7-14 Days (Economy) and 4-7 Days (Priority).

Payment: Credit Card, Bank Transfer, PayPal

Australia-based online 3D printing service 3D Print-Au places its 3D printers at the disposal of customers in Australia, New Zealand, Thailand, UK, and the US. Although this company also produces FDM and FFF printers, you can only order prints made with its SLS machines.

(Visit 3D Print-Au)

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Online 3D Printing Service #18: Beta-Prototypes

Source: Beta Prototypes

Source: Beta Prototypes

Price for Benchy: $45.80 (Nylon, SLS), N/A (PLA, FDM)

Quotes: Request Form, 1 Day response time

Type of 3D Printing Service: B2B

Materials: Metal, Resin, Thermoplastic

3D Printing Methods: FDM, SLA, SLS

Formats: stl (other formats on request)

Shipping: Worldwide (courier service not specified), 2-3 days Lead Time

Payment: Credit Card, Invoice

This online 3D printing service has its printing centers spread around the globe, and ships Worldwide. Its products are manufactured in EOS machines. The finishing techniques Beta-Prototypes’s in repertoire include painting, lacquering, vibratory grinding, metal plating and impregnation. As a plus, Beta-Prototypes offers its technical expertise to achieve best results.

(Visit Beta-Prototypes)

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Online 3D Printing Service #19: HK3DPrint

Source: hk3dprint

Source: hk3dprint

Price for Benchy: $15.90 (Nylon, SLS), N/A (PLA, FDM)

Quotes: Instant Quote

Type of 3D Printing Service: B2B

Materials: Fullcolor, Nylon

3D Printing Methods: SLS

Formats: stl, wrl, obj, 3dm, skp

Shipping: Worldwide (China SF Express, FedEx, EMS). Lead time: 4 days (Standard), two days (Sxpress).

Payment: Credit Card

Hong Kong-based online 3D printing service HK3DPrint produces mostly prototyping architectural models that it ships worldwide. The website sports a quick instant quote system and helpful documentation on 3D printing in general. Special colors and finishing are available on request. Look out for the regular price specials on materials.

(Visit HK3DPrint)

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Online 3D Printing Service #20: Incept3D

Source: Incept 3D

Source: Incept 3D

Price for Benchy: N/A (Nylon, SLS), N/A (PLA, FDM)

Quotes: Request Form, 1 day response time

Type of 3D Printing Service: B2B

Materials: Metal, Resin, Thermoplastic

3D Printing Methods: FDM, SLA, DMLS

Formats: stl, step, iges, Solidworks

Shipping: Worldwide (Fedex, UPS, or USPS), 1-2 days Lead Time

Payment: Credit Cards or Purchase Orders

Incept3D is an online printing service primarily aimed at the needs of engineers and designers. The web page features some educational material on 3D printing. The models printed by this online 3D printing service are made in professional 3D Systems machines. Price for Benchy ABS, FDM: covered by $150 order minimum.

(Visit Incept3D)

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Online 3D Printing Service #21: Kraftwurx

Source: Kraftwurx

Source: Kraftwurx

Price for Benchy: $336.80 (Nylon, SLS), $132.26 (PLA, FDM)

Quotes: Instant Quote

Type of 3D Printing Service: B2C

Materials: Ceramic, Metal, Paper, Resin, Stone, Thermoplastic, Wax

3D Printing Methods: Casting, DMLS, FDM, SLA, SLS

Formats: stl, obj, dae, wrl, zip, rar

Shipping: Worldwide (UPS, USPS)

Payment: PayPal

Aimed at the needs of designers and consumers alike, this online 3D printing service offers a plethora of materials (including precious metals). Also, it lets 3D designers showcase their talent and set up their web stores that build on Kraftwurx’s infrastructure. The professional printers used by Kraftwurx are from 3D Systems, Stratasys, EOS and others.

(Visit Kraftwurx)

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Online 3D Printing Service #22: MeltWerk

meltwerk best 3d printing service

meltwerk best 3d printing service

Price for Benchy: $11.50 (Nylon, SLS), N/A (PLA, FDM)

Quotes: Instant Quote

Type of 3D Printing Service: B2C / B2B

Materials: Plastic

3D Printing Methods: SLS

Formats: stl, ply, 3ds, 3mf

Payment: Minimum order value $5, PayPal

Shipping: DHL (Europe) in 7 – 22 days

The philosophy underpinning online 3D printing service MeltWerk is to do one thing and to do one thing well. You can only print your objects in one color and one material, which is laser sintered white polyamide plastic. The upside to this approach is that MeltWerk is offering a best-price guarantee on their products. So, if after placing your order, you can find another 3D printing service that offers a better price for the same object and material, you’ll get a full refund. Those are the kind of consumer-friendly terms we can all get behind.

(Visit MeltWerk)

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Online 3D Printing Service #23: Rapid3DParts

Source: Rapid 3D Parts

Source: Rapid 3D Parts

Price for Benchy: $32.80 (Nylon, SLS), N/A (PLA, FDM)

Quotes: Request Form, 2 Days Response Time

Type of 3D Printing Service: B2B

Materials: Thermoplastic

3D Printing Methods: ColorJet, PolyJet, SHS, SLS

Formats: stl

Shipping: (Courier Service depends on selected printing method), Rapid3DParts didn’t reply to our request for information.

Payment: EFT, Paypal

Based in Johannesburg, South Africa, Rapid3DParts offers the service of its 3D Systems machines. The other two fields covered by this online 3D printing service are 3D scanning and laser cutting.

(Visit Rapid3DParts)

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Online 3D Printing Service #24: RapidCrafting

Source: RapidCrafting

Source: RapidCrafting

Price for Benchy: below minimum order total $80.00 (Nylon, SLS), below minimum order total $80.00 (PLA, FDM)

Quotes: Email, 1 day response time

Type of 3D Printing Service: B2C / B2B

Materials: Ceramic, Fullcolor, Metal, Resin, Thermoplastic

3D Printing Methods: Colorjet, DMLS, FDM, SLA, SLS

Formats: stl

Shipping: Worldwide (UPS), 3-7 days

Payment: VAT Invoice

Polish RapidCrafting offers a wide array of services. Besides its online 3D printing service, it will lend its expertise in 3D scanning, modeling, and rendering. A specialty of RapidCrafting is architectural scale models. The industrial printers used by this 3D printing service are among others from 3D Systems.

(Visit RapidCrafting)

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Online 3D Printing Service #25: Shapetizer

Source: Shapetizer

Source: Shapetizer

Price for Benchy: $11.80 (Nylon, SLS), N/A (PLA, FDM)

Quotes: Instant Quote

Type of 3D Printing Service: B2C

Materials: Resin, precious Metal, Thermoplastic

3D Printing Methods: Casting, SLA

Formats: stl

Shipping: Shapetizer didn’t reply to our request for information.

Payment: Credit Card, PayPal

Very much in the vein of Kraftwurx, Shapetizer is both a online 3D printing service and retail platform. The focus is almost exclusively on jewelry design – customers can choose from a mind-boggling array of precious metals. Some of the design files on display are for sale. Look for the documentation at the bottom of the page.

(Visit Shapetizer)

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Online 3D Printing Service #26: WhiteClouds

Source: WhiteClouds

Source: WhiteClouds

Price for Benchy: $ n/a (Nylon, SLS). WhiteClouds didn’t reply to our request for a Benchy test object.

Quotes: Request Form

Type of 3D Printing Service: B2B

Materials: Fullcolor

3D Printing Methods: ColorJet, MultiJet

Formats: stl

Shipping: WhiteClouds didn’t reply to our request for information.

Payment: Credit Card, PayPal

WhiteClouds is the largest full-color 3D printing service in the world and is highly focussed on B2B. It has various cooperations with retailers and brands to bring personalized action figures to children or medical models to health care professionals. Its high-quality prints are produced in 3D Systems and Stratasys printers. WhiteClouds has set up 3DPedia, a glossary of terms connected to 3D printing.

(Visit White Clouds)

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Online 3D Printing Service #27: X3D Print

Source: X3D Print

Source: X3D Print

Price for Benchy: N/A (Nylon, SLS), N/A (PLA, FDM)

Quotes: Instant Quote

Type of 3D Printing Service: B2B

Materials: Resin

3D Printing Methods: SLA

Formats: stl, 3dm, 3ds, prj, amf, CATPart, CATProduct, cli, cls, dae, dxf, fbx, igs, iges, jt, magics, MatAM, matPart, mdck, model, exp, dlv, dlv3, mtt, mxp, obj, ply, zcp, prt, asm, x_t, sat, skp, slc, sldprt, sldasm, sli, stp, step, vda, vdafs, wrl, vrml, zpr

Shipping: Worldwide (Chronopost, La Poste)

Payment: Credit Card, Bank Transfer, Cheque

X3D Print has its headquarter in Lyon, France. The prints from X3D Print are all made in SLA machines. It’s online 3D printing service is only the last step in the process X3D Print can assist you with. It also offers help with 3D scanning and STL-repair. The Benchy costs $18.70 printed as PreciX Pro, SLA.

(Visit X3D Print)

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3d-printing-ally

3d-printing-ally

Price for Benchy: $36.35 (Nylon, SLS), N/A (PLA, FDM)

Quotes: Instant Quote

Type of Service: B2C/B2B

Materials: Ceramic, Fullcolor, Nylon, Polycarbonate, Resin, Thermoplastic, Wax

Printing methods: Color Jet Printing, FDM, Multijet Printing, SLA, SLS

Formats: stl

Shipping: 2-5 Days Lead Time, Express Service available for SLS

Payment: Credit Card

Hailing from Eden Prairie, 3D Printing Ally prides itself to operate at the place where additive manufacturing was pioneered in the 1980’s. And indeed, they print off their FDM prints on Stratasys machines, while 3D Systems machines are used for the other technologies. The website boasts a very convenient Instant Quoting system and useful information on the available printing technologies and materials.

(Visit 3D Printing Ally)

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Online 3D Printing Service #29: Iannone 3D

iannone-3d

iannone-3d

Price for Benchy: N/A (Nylon, SLS), N/A (PLA, FDM)

Quotes: Request Form

Type of Service: B2B

Materials: Nylon, Thermoplastic, Wax

Printing methods: FDM, Wax printing

Formats: stl, stp, iges, sldprt, catpart, ipt

Shipping: 2-5 Days Lead Time, Worldwide (USPS, DHL)

Payment: Credit Card, Check

Iannone 3D is  US based 3D printing service that ships worldwide. It aspires to offer 3D prints at a competitive price. The prints are made on Stratasys Fortus printers. Besides 3D printing, Iannone 3D also provides 3D design services. Cost of Benchy $15.60 (ABS, FDM).

(Visit Iannone 3D)

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Online 3D Printing Service #30: BuildParts

buildparts

buildparts

Price for Benchy: $91.07 (Nylon, SLS), N/A (PLA, FDM)

Quotes: Instant Quote

Type of Service: B2B/B2C

Materials: Metal, Resin, Thermoplastic

Printing methods: CLIP, FDM, Polyjet, SLA, SLS, Urethane Casting

Formats: stl, iges

Shipping: 1-3 Days Lead Time, Worldwide (FedEx, UPS)

Payment: Credit Card

BuildParts’s website is a rich source of knowledge on printing technologies in general. Its also features detailed technical specifications on the printers and materials available. The company prints on some 31 machines, in over 50 materials using 5 different processes and offers full finished and polished parts. BuildParts is proud to print off your design at the highest resolution settings possible, even if you might get a better price somewhere else – but at the cost of accuracy.

(Visit BuildParts)
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Online 3D Printing Service #31: PartSnap

Source: PartSnap

Source: PartSnap

Price for Benchy: N/A (Nylon, SLS), $56.54 (PLA, FDM)

Quotes: Instant Quote

Type of 3D Printing Service: B2B

Materials: Resin, Thermoplastic

3D Printing Methods: FDM, FFF, PolyJet

Formats: stl

Shipping: Worldwide (USPS, UPS, FedEx), lead time: 7-10 (economy), 4-6 days (standard), 1-3 (rush)

Payment: Credit Card

The online 3D printing service PartSnap takes pride in being the only registered Professional Engineering firm and that also offers in-house 3D printing services in North Texas. Besides its online 3D printing service, PartSnap provides reverse engineering, development and CAD services; it’s also a reseller for filaments.

(Visit PartSnap)

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Online 3D Printing Service #32: Rapid3D

Source: Rapid3D

Source: Rapid3D

Price for Benchy: N/A (Nylon, SLS), N/A (PLA, FDM)

Quotes: Request Form, 2 Days Response Time

Type of 3D Printing Service: B2C / B2B

Materials: Resin

3D Printing Methods: SLA

Formats: stl, iges, ply, step

Shipping: Multiple Express Options Available

Payment: Credit Card

The UK-based online 3D printing service Rapid3D prints on professional 3D Systems machines. Besides that, Rapid3D is also an expert 3D scanning and vacuum casting. The Benchy costs $73.00 (Resin, SLA).

(Visit Rapid3D)

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Looking for the best online 3D printing service? Here are 33 great online 3D printing services for consumer and small business.

Try: All3DP’s 3D Online Printing Service – Professional 3D Printing for the Best Price!

An online 3D printing service is a company that will professionally print objects on your behalf. It’s a smart business model that leverages economies of scale; large, industrial 3D printers are used to fabricate hundreds and thousands of small, custom print jobs for individual customers. You can either upload your models, or you can choose from a range of models already available.

What are the benefits of using an online 3D printing service, as opposed to owning a 3D printer of your own? Let’s begin with the object. You can send scans, photographs, STL files or even physical items to be fabricated using a 3D printer. You can choose any number of materials and colors for your item, plus typography and size where relevant (e.g. for an engagement ring), so the customization options are endless.

Secondly, there’s the convenience. It’s not just about having your item sent to you in the post, securely tracked and packaged (though that’s nice too). It’s also the fact that you don’t have to worry about the quality control of your objects, as you might with a 3D printer at home. The logistics of printing your order are handled by professionals, to an optimal standard, and typically fulfilled within a reasonable time-frame.

In order to give you an idea of the price range found between B2B and B2C online 3d printing services, we have requested two quotes in common configurations from each: 1) SLS (Selective Laser Sintering) in Nylon and 2) FDM (Fused deposition modeling) in PLA. All prices are USD. The model requested was the renowned 3DBenchy. Some professional B2B 3D printing services didn’t reply to our request, as producing starts for them at a different level. We’ve noted this in the description accordingly.

Here are 32 great online 3D printing services listed in according to their popularity.

Note: The most popular online 3D printing services Shapeways, i.materialise and Sculpteo can be accessed via ALL3DP’s 3D Printing Service, where the actual prices can be compared in real-time.

Have we missed your favorite online 3D printing service? Tell us in the comments, and we’ll add them in a future update.

32 Great Online 3D Printing Services

You can sort and search through each column of this table or skip it and jump to the detailed list.

3D Printing Service Shipping Quotes Type Materials 3D Printing Methods Visitors
3D Hubs Worldwide Instant B2C / B2B Metal, Polypropylene, Paper, Resin, Stone, Thermoplastic, Wax FDM, Jetting, Metal Sintering, Paper, PolyJetting, SLA, SLS, CFF, Wax Casting ★★★
i.materialise Worldwide Instant B2C / B2B Ceramic, Metal, Resin, Thermoplastic, Wood Casting, CeramicJet, Colorjet, DMLS, FDM, Indirect Metal Printing, Polyjet, SLS, SLA ★★★
Sculpteo Worldwide Instant B2C / B2B Ceramic, Fullcolor, Metal, Resin, Thermoplastic, Wax Casting, CLIP, ColorJet, SLA, DMLS, FDM, SLS ★★★
Shapeways Worldwide Instant B2C / B2B Ceramic, Metal, Plastic, Sandstone, Wax SLS, Binder Jet Steel, Wax casting ★★★
Fathom Worldwide Instant B2B Metals, Thermoplastics, Resins, Urethanes, Silicones FDM, PolyJet, SLA, SLS ★★
iMakr Worldwide 1 Day B2C Resin, Thermoplastic FDM, SLA ★★
MakeXYZ Worldwide Instant B2C Nylon, Resin, Thermoplastic FDM, SLA ★★
Materialise OnSite Worldwide Instant B2B Glass, Metal, Multicolor, Resin, Thermoplastic Colorjet, DMLS, FDM, Polyjet, SLA, SLA ★★
Ponoko Worldwide Instant B2C / B2B Metal, Thermoplastic ColorJet, FDM, SLS ★★
Protolabs Worldwide Instant B2B Metal, Nylon, Thermoplastic DMLS, SLA, SLS ★★
Quickparts Worldwide Instant B2B Metal, Nylon, Resin, Thermoplastic, Wax ColorJet, CNC, DMLS, MultiJet, SLA, SLS ★★
StrataSys Direct Worldwide Instant B2B Acrylic, Ceramic, Foam, Metal, Thermoplastic, Wax CNC, DMLS, FDM, LS, PolyJet, SLS, Urethane Casting ★★
Trinckle Worldwide Instant B2C / B2B Metal, Multicolor, Resin, Thermoplastic ColorJet, FDM, SLA, SLS, Wax casting ★★
Voodoo Manufacturing Worldwide Instant B2C/B2B Thermoplastic FDM ★★
StarPrototype Worldwide 1 Day B2C/B2B Metal, Thermoplastic DMLM, SLA ★★
3Diligent Worldwide 1 Day B2C / B2B Metal, Nylon, Resin, Thermoplastic DMLS, EBM, FDM, Polyjet, SLA, SLM, SLS
3D Print-Au US, UK, NZ, TH Instant B2C Nylon SLS
Beta-Prototypes Worldwide 1 Day B2B Metal, Resin, Thermoplastic FDM, SLA, SLS
HK3DPrint Worldwide Instant B2B Fullcolor, Nylon SLS
Incept3D Worldwide 1 Day B2B Metal, Resin, Thermoplastic FDM, SLA, DMLS
Kraftwurx Worldwide Instant B2C Ceramic, Metal, Paper, Resin, Stone, Thermoplastic, Wax Casting, DMLS, FDM, SLA, SLS
MeltWerk Europe Instant B2C / B2B Plastic SLS
Rapid3DParts N/A 2 Days B2B Thermoplastic ColorJet, PolyJet, SHS, SLS
RapidCrafting Worldwide 1 Day B2C / B2B Ceramic, Fullcolor, Metal, Resin, Thermoplastic Colorjet, DMLS, FDM, SLA, SLS
Shapetizer N/A Instant B2C Resin, Polyamide, precious Metal Casting, SLA
WhiteClouds N/A N/A B2B Fullcolor, Metal, Plastic ColorJet, MJP, SLA, DMP, SLS
X3D Print Worldwide Instant B2B Resin SLA
3D Printing Ally N/A Instant B2C/B2B Ceramic, Fullcolor, Nylon, Polycarbonate, Resin, Thermoplastic, Wax Color Jet Printing, FDM, Multijet Printing, SLA, SLS
Iannone 3D Worldwide N/A B2B Nylon, Thermoplastic, Wax FDM, Wax printing
BuildParts Worldwide Instant B2C/B2B Metal, Resin, Thermoplastic CLIP, FDM, Polyjet, SLA, SLS, Urethane Casting
PartSnap Worldwide Instant B2B Resin, Thermoplastic FDM, FFF, PolyJet
Rapid3D N/A 2 Days B2C / B2B Resin SLA

Online 3D Printing Service #1: 3D Hubs

3D Hubs Best 3D Printing Service

3D Hubs Best 3D Printing Service

Price for Benchy: from $25.66 (Nylon, SLS), from $8.60 (PLA, FDM)

Quotes: Instant Quote

Type of 3D Printing Service: B2C / B2B

Materials: Metal, Polypropylene, Paper, Resin, Stone, Thermoplastic, Wax

3D Printing Methods: FDM, Jetting, Metal Sintering, Paper, PolyJetting, SLA, SLS, CFF, Wax Casting

Formats: stl, obj

Shipping: Worldwide (UPS, FedEx, DHL and more, depends on chosen Hub), pickup is free

Payment: Credit Card, Paypal, and some local payment services

Via the 3D Hubs, you can search for individuals and businesses that offer 3D printing services in your area, upload your STL file for an instant estimate, and connect with them directly to get the job done. The online 3D printing service also allows you to filter by materials, by user rating, by distance, and multiple other factors. Regardless of the type of item you want to have printed, there’s likely someone in your vicinity who can print it for you. A considerable number of materials can be printed in industrial quality, these are marked as »HD« in the search field.

(Visit 3D Hubs)

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Online 3D Printing Service #2: i.materialise

imaterialise 3d printing service

imaterialise 3d printing service

Price for Benchy: $14.10 (Nylon, SLS), N/A (PLA, FDM)

Quotes: Instant Quote

Type of 3D Printing Service: B2C / B2B

Materials: Ceramic, Metal, Resin, Thermoplastic, Wood

3D Printing Methods: Casting, CeramicJet, Colorjet, DMLS, FDM, Indirect Metal Printing, Polyjet, SLS, SLA

Formats: stl, obj, wrl, skp, dae, 3mf, 3ds, igs, model, 3dm, fbx, ply, magics, mgx, x3d, stp, step, prt, matpart

Shipping: Worldwide (UPS), lead time: up to 10 days (standard), 48 hours (express)

Payment: Credit Card, PayPal

Materialise is a company that works with industrial clients to produce prototypes and 3D printed products. But for the general public and individual designers, Materialise offers an online 3D printing service called i.materialise. Like Shapeways, the online 3D printing service allows anyone to upload their 3D designs and have them printed out. Once an object has been uploaded and successfully printed, a designer can offer it for sale either via the gallery on the i.materalise online store, or embedded on their website.

Note: i.materialise can also be accessed via ALL3DP’s 3D Printing Service, where the actual prices can be compared to Shapeways and Scuplteo in real-time.

(Visit i.materialise)

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Online 3D Printing Service #3: Sculpteo

sculpteo best 3d printing service

sculpteo best 3d printing service

Price for Benchy: $22.70 (Nylon, SLS), N/A (PLA, FDM)

Quotes: Instant Quote

Type of 3D Printing Service: B2C / B2B

Materials: Ceramic, Fullcolor, Metal, Resin, Thermoplastic, Wax

3D Printing Methods: Casting, CLIP, ColorJet, SLA, DMLS, FDM, SLS

Formats: stl, obj, skp, off, ply, kmz, 3ds, ac3d, ipt, dae, md2/md3, q3o, cob, dxf, lwo, iges, stp, vrml, scad, zip, rar, tgz, carpart, catproduct, cgr, sldprt, sldasm, iges, igs, sat, 3dm, 3mf, prc, u3d, x_t

Shipping: Worldwide (colissimo 2 days, UPS 1-2 days and others)

Payment: Credit Card, Debit Card, PayPal

Like Shapeways and i.materialise, Sculpteo is an online 3D printing service that allows anyone to upload 3D models and have them fabricated in a wide variety of materials. In keeping with its competitors, Sculpteo also allows individuals and professionals to open up an online storefront and sell their designs to the public. Sculpteo’s stable of printers includes high-end machines by 3D Systems, EOS, Stratasys, and ZCorp. Its extensive technical documentation will help you detect design flaws and choose the right material for your project.

Note: Sculpteo can also be accessed via ALL3DP’s 3D Printing Service, where the actual prices can be compared to Shapeways and i.materialise in real-time.

(Visit Sculpteo)

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Online 3D Printing Service #4: Shapeways

shapeways best 3d printing service

shapeways best 3d printing service

Price for Benchy: $13.84 (Nylon, SLS), N/A (PLA, FDM)

Quotes: Instant Quote

Type of 3D Printing Service: B2C / B2B

Materials: Ceramic, Metal, Plastic, Sandstone, Wax

3D Printing Methods: SLS, Binder Jet Steel, Wax casting

Formats: stl, obj, x3d, dae, vrml

Shipping: Worldwide (DHL, UPS, USPS), 1-9 days

Payment: Credit Card, PayPal, Bank Transfer

World’s most popular online 3D printing service Shapeways offers two services. On the consumer side, you can choose from a broad array of professionally designed items, customize them and have them printed to your specifications. Similar to other 3D printing services, Shapeways offers storefronts to designers to sell and print their work. Shapeways is also suitable for rapid prototyping – customers will profit from industrial grade printers (EOS, 3D Systems) and dedicated technical support.

Note: Shapeways can also be accessed via ALL3DP’s 3D Printing Service, where the actual prices can be compared to i.materialise and Scuplteo in real-time.

(Visit Shapeways)

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Online 3D Printing Service #5: Fathom

Source: Fathom

Source: Fathom

Price for Benchy: $150 minimum order total (Nylon, SLS), N/A (PLA, FDM)

Quotes: Instant Quote, (for Advanced Services Request Form)

Type of 3D Printing Service: B2B

Materials: Metals, Thermoplastics, Resins, Urethanes, Silicones

3D Printing Methods: FDM, PolyJet, SLA, SLS, (Advanced Services: CNC Machining, Urethane casting, DMLS printing, Rapid Injection Molding, Low-Volume Production, Model Finishing)

Formats: stl, 3dm, 3ds, model, exp, dlv, dlv3, catpart, iges, igs, sld, sldprt, step, stp, x_t, prt, ply, zcp, vda, wrl, vrml, skp, sat, jt, dxf, fbx, dae, zpr, obj

Shipping: 1-4 days Lead Time, Worldwide (FedEx and local couriers chosen by the customer)

Payment: Credit Card

Oakland-based online 3D printing service Fathom offers a platform called SmartQuote that caters to the needs of prototyping. The company boasts a wide array of Stratasys printers and sophisticated finishing services, that include color, texture, artwork and assembly. The website features extensive documentation of printing methods and materials. For production purposes, Fathom offers advanced services that extend the range of printing methods (see above). In addition to the online 3D printing service, Fathom is also a reseller for Stratasys printers and lends its expertise in engineering and production to customers.

(Visit Fathom)

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Online 3D Printing Service #6: iMakr

Source: iMakr

Source: iMakr

Price for Benchy: N/A (Nylon, SLS), $49.50 (PLA, FDM)

Quotes: Request Form, 1 Day Response Time

Type of 3D Printing Service: B2C

Materials: Resin, Thermoplastic

3D Printing Methods: FDM, SLA

Formats: stl, obj

Shipping: Worldwide (courier service not specified, didn’t reply to our request for information), 3-5 Days Lead Time, store pick-up possible

Payment: Cash, Credit Card, Debit Card, PayPal, Wire Transfer

iMakr runs two stores in London and New York. On the website this company offers the full range of its expertise: the online 3D printing service makes up only a fraction of iMakr’s business. It also sells FDM and SLA printers from a multitude of manufacturers, as well as 3D scanners. iMakr is set apart from its competitors by its 3D printer renting service. If you are new to the world of 3D printing, you can employ its consulting, training and maintenance services. Assembly and finishing services are available on request.

(Visit iMakr)

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Online 3D Printing Service #7: MakeXYZ

Source: MakeXYZ

Source: MakeXYZ

Price for Benchy: $66.90 (Nylon, SLS), $18.90 (PLA, FDM)

Quotes: Instant Quote

Type of 3D Printing Service: B2C

Materials: Nylon, Resin, Thermoplastic

3D Printing Methods: FDM, SLA

Formats: stl, obj, zip, step, stp, iges, igs, 3ds, wrl

Shipping: Worldwide (UPS, USPS), 3-5 Days (Standard, free), Overnight Delivery Available (orders over $250 get upgraded for free)

Payment: Credit Card, PayPal

This online 3D printing service has a very clean, no-nonsense website. The convenient instant quotation system does not compel you to register. Similar to 3D Hubs, you can browse for 3D printers in your area or price range. For a fee MakeXYZ will design a 3D printable model for you within 48 hours and according to your description.

(Visit MakeXYZ)

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Sourece: Materialise OnSite

Sourece: Materialise OnSite

Price for Benchy: covered by $100 minimum order value (Nylon, SLS), covered by $100 minimum order value (PLA, FDM)

Quotes: Instant Quote

Type of 3D Printing Service: B2B

Materials: Glass, Metal, Multicolor, Resin, Thermoplastic

3D Printing Methods: Colorjet, DMLS, FDM, Polyjet, SLA, SLA

Formats: stl, 3ds, 3dm, obj, wrl, matpart, stp, skp, sldprt, step, catpart, iges, model, mxp, mgx

Shipping: Worldwide (UPS) standard free, NextDay service available for SLA

Payment: Materialisie OnSite didn’t reply to our request for information.

OnSite is Materialise’s online 3D printing service for industrial clients. Accordingly, you will find a wide range of printing technologies, materials, and finishes at your disposal. OnSite grants 10% discount for online orders.

(Visit Materialise OnSite)

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Online 3D Printing Service #9: Ponoko

ponoko best 3d printing service

ponoko best 3d printing service

Price for Benchy: N/A (Nylon, SLS), N/A (PLA, FDM)

Quotes: Instant Quote

Type of 3D Printing Service: B2C / B2B

Materials: Metal, Thermoplastic

3D Printing Methods: ColorJet, FDM, SLS

Formats: stl, dae, vrml

Shipping: Worldwide (UPS and USPS), 1-7 days

Payment: PayPal

Ponoko provides online 3D printing services plus laser etching and engraving too. The company has designers, 3D printers and robots on hand, and pricing starts as low at $5 depending on what needs printing and the materials you choose. Ponoko also offers same-day shipping if you order before a cut-off point. In theory, that means it’s possible to convert your STL or CAD files into actual physical products and have them in your hands within the space of a day. Ponoko’s professional 3D printers are from 3D Systems and ZCorp. Ponoko 3D prints in metal and thermoplastic only – the price for a Benchy in ABS, FDM is $38.78.

(Visit Ponoko)

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Online 3D Printing Service #10: Protolabs

Source: ProtoLabs

Source: ProtoLabs

Price for Benchy: $81.90 (Nylon, SLS), N/A (PLA, FDM)

Quotes: Instant Quote

Type of 3D Printing Service: B2B

Materials: Metal, Nylon, Thermoplastic

3D Printing Methods: DMLS, SLA, SLS

Formats: stl, sldprt, prt, igs, stp, sat, x_t, x_b

Shipping: Worldwide (courier service not specified, didn’t reply to our request for information), lead time 1-7 days

Payment: Invoice, PayPal

With 500 machines placed around the globe, Protolabs services industries worldwide. The website of this online 3D printing service features documentation on printing technology, materials, and a glossary.

(Visit Protolabs)

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Online 3D Printing Service #11: Quickparts

Source: 3D Systems

Source: 3D Systems

Price for Benchy: $84.00 (Nylon, SLS), N/A (PLA, FDM)

Quotes: Instant Quote

Type of 3D Printing Service: B2B

Materials: Metal, Nylon, Resin, Thermoplastic, Wax

3D Printing Methods: ColorJet, CNC, DMLS, MultiJet, SLA, SLS

Formats: stl, sldprt, prt, ipt, igs, stp, step, doc, xls, pdf, dwg, txt, iges, dxf, jpg, x_t, x_b, sat, eprt, tif, wrl, catpart, zip

Shipping: Worldwide (courier service not specified), lead time 3-5 days

Payment: Quickparts didn’t reply to our request for information.

Quickparts is a high-quality online 3D printing service offered by 3D Systems, a leading manufacturer of industrial printers. Here you can take your pick from 3D System’s broad array of printers and materials. Extensive technical documentation will help you detect design flaws and choose the right material for your project. This online 3D printing service is aimed at professionals in engineering, medicine, and industrial design.

(Visit Quickparts)

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Source: StrataSys

Source: StrataSys

Price for Benchy: $46 (Nylon, SLS), $133 (PLA, FDM)

Quotes: Instant Quote

Type of 3D Printing Service: B2B

Materials: Acrylic, Ceramic, Foam, Metal, Thermoplastic, Wax

3D Printing Methods: CNC, DMLS, FDM, LS, PolyJet, SLS, Urethane Casting

Formats: stl

Shipping: Worldwide (courier service not specified, depends on customer’s location)

Payment: StrataSys Direct didn’t reply to our request for information.

One of the leading manufacturers of industrial grade 3D printers, Stratasys is also offering a high-quality 3D printing service. Fittingly, Stratasys sports a dazzling assortment of materials, which are explained at length in the documentation. This online 3D printing service is aimed at professionals in engineering, medicine, and industrial design. A neat feature of its online quoting page is the ability to create and edit styles (consisting of the printing method, material, finishing and surface treatment) that can be applied to successive projects. Stratasys is also sharing its expertise with companies interested in switching to additive manufacturing.

(Visit Stratasys)

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Online 3D Printing Service #13: Trinckle

trinckle best 3d printing service

trinckle best 3d printing service

Price for Benchy: $20.45 (Nylon, SLS), N/A (PLA, FDM)

Quotes: Instant Quote

Type of 3D Printing Service: B2C / B2B

Materials: Metal, Multicolor, Resin, Thermoplastic

3D Printing Methods: ColorJet, FDM, SLA, SLS, Wax casting

Formats: stl, ply, 3ds, 3mf

Shipping: Worldwide (DHL), lead time: 8- 23 days (depending on material), express options available

Payment: Bank Transfer, PayPal

Trinckle is Meltwerk’s parent company that caters to the needs of engineering professionals. The online 3D printing service offers a marketplace to buy 3D printed goods, tools to check the structural integrity of your model (thereby saving time and money), plus detailed guides on the pros and cons of each material. Also, they accept commissions from small businesses and individuals alike. What sets Trinckle apart from other online 3D printing services, however, are their detailed corporate communications on the environmental impact. The Benchy costs $20.25 as ABS, FDM.

(Visit Trinckle)

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voodoo-manufacturing

voodoo-manufacturing

Price for Benchy: N/A (Nylon, SLS), $12.11 (PLA, FDM)

Quotes: Instant Quote

Type of Service: B2B/B2C

Materials: Thermoplastic

Printing methods: FDM

Formats: stl

Shipping: Worldwide (see below) US (Uber Rush, FedEx), Rush Production available

Payment: Credit Card

Voodoo Manufacturing is based in Brooklyn and lends its 3D printing services for individual prints as well as for large scale production. So far their portfolio has included projects such as printing off collectibles for popular TV shows and gear for a high-fashion show. All prints are made with a massive fleet of MakerBots. As of December 2016 Voodoo Manufacturing does not ship internationally for orders under $2.500.

(Visit Voodoo Manufacturing)

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Online 3D Printing Service #15: StarPrototype

starprototype

starprototype

Price for Benchy: N/A (Nylon, SLS), N/A (PLA, FDM)

Quotes: Request Form, 1 Day Response Time

Type of Service: B2B/B2C

Materials: Metal, Thermoplastic

Printing methods: DMLM, SLA

Formats: stl

Shipping: Worldwide (Fedex, DHL, UPS), 4-5 Days (including customs clearance)

Payment: TT, Paypal

StarPrototype offers a wide range of prototyping services for professionals and ambitious hobbyists. The website includes detailed information on the available technologies: Besides 3D printing, other techniques offered by this 3D online printing service are Plastic Mold Injection, CNC Machining, Pressure Die Casting and Vacuum Casting. The case studies are a worthwhile read and clearly demonstrate what you can achieve with this company by your side. The price for the Benchy is (ABS, SLA).

(Visit StarPrototype)

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Online 3D Printing Service #16: 3Diligent

3Diligent

3Diligent

Price for Benchy: from $49.70 (Nylon, SLS), from $63.50 (PLA, FDM)

Quotes: Request Form, 1 Day response time

Type of 3D Printing Service: B2C / B2B

Materials: Metal, Nylon, Resin, Thermoplastic

3D Printing Methods: DMLS, EBM, FDM, Polyjet, SLA, SLM, SLS

Formats: stl, stp, igs

Shipping: Worldwide (FedEx), lead time depends on vendor

Payment: Bank Transfer, Credit Card, PayPal, Purchase Order, Retainer

3Diligent offers two kinds of online 3D printing services: 3Diligent Direct, which features a custom selection of optimal printing partner by an expert. Confusingly, the second service, 3Diligent Marketplace is also divided into a free and a premium service: FREE: automatic analysis and allocation of printing provider. PREMIUM: access to »outstanding fabricators with professional and industrial equipment«.

When requesting a quote, you state your budget, select the material, the process and other requirements of your project. If you are unsure which material or process is suitable for your design, you can let the vendors decide. 3Diligent will then forward your bids by printing hubs to pick from them. The knowledge center provides concise information on printing methods and materials, as well as series of videos that explain the order process.

(Visit 3Diligent)

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Online 3D Printing Service #17: 3D Print-Au

Source: 3DPrint-AU

Source: 3DPrint-AU

Price for Benchy: $15.75 (Nylon, SLS), N/A (PLA, FDM)

Quotes: Instant Quote

Type of 3D Printing Service: B2C

Materials: Nylon

3D Printing Methods: SLS

Formats: stl

Shipping: Australia, New Zealand, Thailand, UK, and the US, Lead Time 7-14 Days (Economy) and 4-7 Days (Priority).

Payment: Credit Card, Bank Transfer, PayPal

Australia-based online 3D printing service 3D Print-Au places its 3D printers at the disposal of customers in Australia, New Zealand, Thailand, UK, and the US. Although this company also produces FDM and FFF printers, you can only order prints made with its SLS machines.

(Visit 3D Print-Au)

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Online 3D Printing Service #18: Beta-Prototypes

Source: Beta Prototypes

Source: Beta Prototypes

Price for Benchy: $45.80 (Nylon, SLS), N/A (PLA, FDM)

Quotes: Request Form, 1 Day response time

Type of 3D Printing Service: B2B

Materials: Metal, Resin, Thermoplastic

3D Printing Methods: FDM, SLA, SLS

Formats: stl (other formats on request)

Shipping: Worldwide (courier service not specified), 2-3 days Lead Time

Payment: Credit Card, Invoice

This online 3D printing service has its printing centers spread around the globe, and ships Worldwide. Its products are manufactured in EOS machines. The finishing techniques Beta-Prototypes’s in repertoire include painting, lacquering, vibratory grinding, metal plating and impregnation. As a plus, Beta-Prototypes offers its technical expertise to achieve best results.

(Visit Beta-Prototypes)

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Online 3D Printing Service #19: HK3DPrint

Source: hk3dprint

Source: hk3dprint

Price for Benchy: $15.90 (Nylon, SLS), N/A (PLA, FDM)

Quotes: Instant Quote

Type of 3D Printing Service: B2B

Materials: Fullcolor, Nylon

3D Printing Methods: SLS

Formats: stl, wrl, obj, 3dm, skp

Shipping: Worldwide (China SF Express, FedEx, EMS). Lead time: 4 days (Standard), two days (Sxpress).

Payment: Credit Card

Hong Kong-based online 3D printing service HK3DPrint produces mostly prototyping architectural models that it ships worldwide. The website sports a quick instant quote system and helpful documentation on 3D printing in general. Special colors and finishing are available on request. Look out for the regular price specials on materials.

(Visit HK3DPrint)

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Online 3D Printing Service #20: Incept3D

Source: Incept 3D

Source: Incept 3D

Price for Benchy: N/A (Nylon, SLS), N/A (PLA, FDM)

Quotes: Request Form, 1 day response time

Type of 3D Printing Service: B2B

Materials: Metal, Resin, Thermoplastic

3D Printing Methods: FDM, SLA, DMLS

Formats: stl, step, iges, Solidworks

Shipping: Worldwide (Fedex, UPS, or USPS), 1-2 days Lead Time

Payment: Credit Cards or Purchase Orders

Incept3D is an online printing service primarily aimed at the needs of engineers and designers. The web page features some educational material on 3D printing. The models printed by this online 3D printing service are made in professional 3D Systems machines. Price for Benchy ABS, FDM: covered by $150 order minimum.

(Visit Incept3D)

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Online 3D Printing Service #21: Kraftwurx

Source: Kraftwurx

Source: Kraftwurx

Price for Benchy: $336.80 (Nylon, SLS), $132.26 (PLA, FDM)

Quotes: Instant Quote

Type of 3D Printing Service: B2C

Materials: Ceramic, Metal, Paper, Resin, Stone, Thermoplastic, Wax

3D Printing Methods: Casting, DMLS, FDM, SLA, SLS

Formats: stl, obj, dae, wrl, zip, rar

Shipping: Worldwide (UPS, USPS)

Payment: PayPal

Aimed at the needs of designers and consumers alike, this online 3D printing service offers a plethora of materials (including precious metals). Also, it lets 3D designers showcase their talent and set up their web stores that build on Kraftwurx’s infrastructure. The professional printers used by Kraftwurx are from 3D Systems, Stratasys, EOS and others.

(Visit Kraftwurx)

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Online 3D Printing Service #22: MeltWerk

meltwerk best 3d printing service

meltwerk best 3d printing service

Price for Benchy: $11.50 (Nylon, SLS), N/A (PLA, FDM)

Quotes: Instant Quote

Type of 3D Printing Service: B2C / B2B

Materials: Plastic

3D Printing Methods: SLS

Formats: stl, ply, 3ds, 3mf

Payment: Minimum order value $5, PayPal

Shipping: DHL (Europe) in 7 – 22 days

The philosophy underpinning online 3D printing service MeltWerk is to do one thing and to do one thing well. You can only print your objects in one color and one material, which is laser sintered white polyamide plastic. The upside to this approach is that MeltWerk is offering a best-price guarantee on their products. So, if after placing your order, you can find another 3D printing service that offers a better price for the same object and material, you’ll get a full refund. Those are the kind of consumer-friendly terms we can all get behind.

(Visit MeltWerk)

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Online 3D Printing Service #23: Rapid3DParts

Source: Rapid 3D Parts

Source: Rapid 3D Parts

Price for Benchy: $32.80 (Nylon, SLS), N/A (PLA, FDM)

Quotes: Request Form, 2 Days Response Time

Type of 3D Printing Service: B2B

Materials: Thermoplastic

3D Printing Methods: ColorJet, PolyJet, SHS, SLS

Formats: stl

Shipping: (Courier Service depends on selected printing method), Rapid3DParts didn’t reply to our request for information.

Payment: EFT, Paypal

Based in Johannesburg, South Africa, Rapid3DParts offers the service of its 3D Systems machines. The other two fields covered by this online 3D printing service are 3D scanning and laser cutting.

(Visit Rapid3DParts)

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Online 3D Printing Service #24: RapidCrafting

Source: RapidCrafting

Source: RapidCrafting

Price for Benchy: below minimum order total $80.00 (Nylon, SLS), below minimum order total $80.00 (PLA, FDM)

Quotes: Email, 1 day response time

Type of 3D Printing Service: B2C / B2B

Materials: Ceramic, Fullcolor, Metal, Resin, Thermoplastic

3D Printing Methods: Colorjet, DMLS, FDM, SLA, SLS

Formats: stl

Shipping: Worldwide (UPS), 3-7 days

Payment: VAT Invoice

Polish RapidCrafting offers a wide array of services. Besides its online 3D printing service, it will lend its expertise in 3D scanning, modeling, and rendering. A specialty of RapidCrafting is architectural scale models. The industrial printers used by this 3D printing service are among others from 3D Systems.

(Visit RapidCrafting)

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Online 3D Printing Service #25: Shapetizer

Source: Shapetizer

Source: Shapetizer

Price for Benchy: $11.80 (Nylon, SLS), N/A (PLA, FDM)

Quotes: Instant Quote

Type of 3D Printing Service: B2C

Materials: Resin, precious Metal, Thermoplastic

3D Printing Methods: Casting, SLA

Formats: stl

Shipping: Shapetizer didn’t reply to our request for information.

Payment: Credit Card, PayPal

Very much in the vein of Kraftwurx, Shapetizer is both a online 3D printing service and retail platform. The focus is almost exclusively on jewelry design – customers can choose from a mind-boggling array of precious metals. Some of the design files on display are for sale. Look for the documentation at the bottom of the page.

(Visit Shapetizer)

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Online 3D Printing Service #26: WhiteClouds

Source: WhiteClouds

Source: WhiteClouds

Price for Benchy: $ n/a (Nylon, SLS). WhiteClouds didn’t reply to our request for a Benchy test object.

Quotes: Request Form

Type of 3D Printing Service: B2B

Materials: Fullcolor

3D Printing Methods: ColorJet, MultiJet

Formats: stl

Shipping: WhiteClouds didn’t reply to our request for information.

Payment: Credit Card, PayPal

WhiteClouds is the largest full-color 3D printing service in the world and is highly focussed on B2B. It has various cooperations with retailers and brands to bring personalized action figures to children or medical models to health care professionals. Its high-quality prints are produced in 3D Systems and Stratasys printers. WhiteClouds has set up 3DPedia, a glossary of terms connected to 3D printing.

(Visit White Clouds)

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Online 3D Printing Service #27: X3D Print

Source: X3D Print

Source: X3D Print

Price for Benchy: N/A (Nylon, SLS), N/A (PLA, FDM)

Quotes: Instant Quote

Type of 3D Printing Service: B2B

Materials: Resin

3D Printing Methods: SLA

Formats: stl, 3dm, 3ds, prj, amf, CATPart, CATProduct, cli, cls, dae, dxf, fbx, igs, iges, jt, magics, MatAM, matPart, mdck, model, exp, dlv, dlv3, mtt, mxp, obj, ply, zcp, prt, asm, x_t, sat, skp, slc, sldprt, sldasm, sli, stp, step, vda, vdafs, wrl, vrml, zpr

Shipping: Worldwide (Chronopost, La Poste)

Payment: Credit Card, Bank Transfer, Cheque

X3D Print has its headquarter in Lyon, France. The prints from X3D Print are all made in SLA machines. It’s online 3D printing service is only the last step in the process X3D Print can assist you with. It also offers help with 3D scanning and STL-repair. The Benchy costs $18.70 printed as PreciX Pro, SLA.

(Visit X3D Print)

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3d-printing-ally

3d-printing-ally

Price for Benchy: $36.35 (Nylon, SLS), N/A (PLA, FDM)

Quotes: Instant Quote

Type of Service: B2C/B2B

Materials: Ceramic, Fullcolor, Nylon, Polycarbonate, Resin, Thermoplastic, Wax

Printing methods: Color Jet Printing, FDM, Multijet Printing, SLA, SLS

Formats: stl

Shipping: 2-5 Days Lead Time, Express Service available for SLS

Payment: Credit Card

Hailing from Eden Prairie, 3D Printing Ally prides itself to operate at the place where additive manufacturing was pioneered in the 1980’s. And indeed, they print off their FDM prints on Stratasys machines, while 3D Systems machines are used for the other technologies. The website boasts a very convenient Instant Quoting system and useful information on the available printing technologies and materials.

(Visit 3D Printing Ally)

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Online 3D Printing Service #29: Iannone 3D

iannone-3d

iannone-3d

Price for Benchy: N/A (Nylon, SLS), N/A (PLA, FDM)

Quotes: Request Form

Type of Service: B2B

Materials: Nylon, Thermoplastic, Wax

Printing methods: FDM, Wax printing

Formats: stl, stp, iges, sldprt, catpart, ipt

Shipping: 2-5 Days Lead Time, Worldwide (USPS, DHL)

Payment: Credit Card, Check

Iannone 3D is  US based 3D printing service that ships worldwide. It aspires to offer 3D prints at a competitive price. The prints are made on Stratasys Fortus printers. Besides 3D printing, Iannone 3D also provides 3D design services. Cost of Benchy $15.60 (ABS, FDM).

(Visit Iannone 3D)

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Online 3D Printing Service #30: BuildParts

buildparts

buildparts

Price for Benchy: $91.07 (Nylon, SLS), N/A (PLA, FDM)

Quotes: Instant Quote

Type of Service: B2B/B2C

Materials: Metal, Resin, Thermoplastic

Printing methods: CLIP, FDM, Polyjet, SLA, SLS, Urethane Casting

Formats: stl, iges

Shipping: 1-3 Days Lead Time, Worldwide (FedEx, UPS)

Payment: Credit Card

BuildParts’s website is a rich source of knowledge on printing technologies in general. Its also features detailed technical specifications on the printers and materials available. The company prints on some 31 machines, in over 50 materials using 5 different processes and offers full finished and polished parts. BuildParts is proud to print off your design at the highest resolution settings possible, even if you might get a better price somewhere else – but at the cost of accuracy.

(Visit BuildParts)
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Online 3D Printing Service #31: PartSnap

Source: PartSnap

Source: PartSnap

Price for Benchy: N/A (Nylon, SLS), $56.54 (PLA, FDM)

Quotes: Instant Quote

Type of 3D Printing Service: B2B

Materials: Resin, Thermoplastic

3D Printing Methods: FDM, FFF, PolyJet

Formats: stl

Shipping: Worldwide (USPS, UPS, FedEx), lead time: 7-10 (economy), 4-6 days (standard), 1-3 (rush)

Payment: Credit Card

The online 3D printing service PartSnap takes pride in being the only registered Professional Engineering firm and that also offers in-house 3D printing services in North Texas. Besides its online 3D printing service, PartSnap provides reverse engineering, development and CAD services; it’s also a reseller for filaments.

(Visit PartSnap)

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Online 3D Printing Service #32: Rapid3D

Source: Rapid3D

Source: Rapid3D

Price for Benchy: N/A (Nylon, SLS), N/A (PLA, FDM)

Quotes: Request Form, 2 Days Response Time

Type of 3D Printing Service: B2C / B2B

Materials: Resin

3D Printing Methods: SLA

Formats: stl, iges, ply, step

Shipping: Multiple Express Options Available

Payment: Credit Card

The UK-based online 3D printing service Rapid3D prints on professional 3D Systems machines. Besides that, Rapid3D is also an expert 3D scanning and vacuum casting. The Benchy costs $73.00 (Resin, SLA).

(Visit Rapid3D)

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Source from..

This Stunning 3D Printed Zelda Map Was Made in Minecraft

3DPrintNerd.com is a 3D Printing Comparison Shopping Engine. With a commitment of delivering consumers a shopping experience, 3dprintnerd.com offers users easy to use search tools that will enable them to make educated decisions when making 3D printing purchases. 3Dprintnerd.com partnered with major shopping marketplaces such as Amazon Associates, Ebay Partners, and Prosperent and e-commerce sites committed in selling consumer and professional 3D printing products.

French Foundry Produces Sand Casting Models with 3D Printing


December 20, 2016 Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Google+ all3dp.com


VHM Fonderie uses Stratasys’ PolyJet 3D printing technology to create master models for the sand casting of manufacturing tools.

While 3D printing is used for a vast range of applications and prototyping purposes, the production of heavy duty manufacturing tools are still left to industrial methods like sand casting. But that doesn’t mean that 3D printing technology can’t have an impact on the workflow of these advanced casting processes.

The French foundry and machining company VHM Fonderie has fully integrated Stratasys’ PolyJet 3D printing technology into their production workflow. The company, formerly known as Heinrich Fonderie, has merged 3D printing with traditional sand casting to create industrial iron castings for manufacturing tools.

VHM Fonderie has been utilizing a Connex Multi-material 3D Printer to develop functional prototypes and master models that are used to produce manufacturing tools via sand casting. To produce these complex sand casting molds, the foundry has been 3D printing models with Rigur, Stratasys’ advanced simulated polypropylene material. After the master model of a specified part is 3D printed, a sand casting mold is created to manufacture the object in question.

3D Printing Models For Complex Sand Casting

By integrating PolyJet 3D printing into their workflow, VHM Fonderie has cut product development time from multiple weeks to a few hours, allowing for quicker order delivery to their customers. Additionally, the foundry has also used 3D printing to produce assembly jigs and spare parts for certain tooling machines. For instance, they recently increased production efficiency by 3D printing positioning jigs for use across their assembly line.

Believe it or not, Stratasys’ PolyJet 3D printing technology has become such an integral part of VHM Fonderie’s workflow that the company has established their own 3D printing bureau, Reali3D. The facility was created to optimize the production of 3D printed master molds, functional prototypes, and assembly jigs.

Laurent Poux, Industrial Director, VHM Group, said:

“We’re really excited to be able to extend the benefits of 3D printing to our customers through Reali3D, where we expect to produce everything from concept models and fully-functional prototypes, to assembly tools for the production line.”

All in all, VHM Fonderie’s use of Stratasys’ PolyJet 3D printing technology has led to faster product development and a more effective manufacturing workflow. This has allowed them to provide their Paris-based clients — which includes famous landmarks like the Le Jardin des Tuileries, Le Caroussel du Louvre, and La Place Vendôme — with the manufacturing tools they need in an extremely time-efficient manner.

sand casting

sand casting

VHM Fonderie uses Stratasys’ PolyJet 3D printing technology to create master models for the sand casting of manufacturing tools.

While 3D printing is used for a vast range of applications and prototyping purposes, the production of heavy duty manufacturing tools are still left to industrial methods like sand casting. But that doesn’t mean that 3D printing technology can’t have an impact on the workflow of these advanced casting processes.

The French foundry and machining company VHM Fonderie has fully integrated Stratasys’ PolyJet 3D printing technology into their production workflow. The company, formerly known as Heinrich Fonderie, has merged 3D printing with traditional sand casting to create industrial iron castings for manufacturing tools.

VHM Fonderie has been utilizing a Connex Multi-material 3D Printer to develop functional prototypes and master models that are used to produce manufacturing tools via sand casting. To produce these complex sand casting molds, the foundry has been 3D printing models with Rigur, Stratasys’ advanced simulated polypropylene material. After the master model of a specified part is 3D printed, a sand casting mold is created to manufacture the object in question.

3D Printing Models For Complex Sand Casting

By integrating PolyJet 3D printing into their workflow, VHM Fonderie has cut product development time from multiple weeks to a few hours, allowing for quicker order delivery to their customers. Additionally, the foundry has also used 3D printing to produce assembly jigs and spare parts for certain tooling machines. For instance, they recently increased production efficiency by 3D printing positioning jigs for use across their assembly line.

Believe it or not, Stratasys’ PolyJet 3D printing technology has become such an integral part of VHM Fonderie’s workflow that the company has established their own 3D printing bureau, Reali3D. The facility was created to optimize the production of 3D printed master molds, functional prototypes, and assembly jigs.

Laurent Poux, Industrial Director, VHM Group, said:

“We’re really excited to be able to extend the benefits of 3D printing to our customers through Reali3D, where we expect to produce everything from concept models and fully-functional prototypes, to assembly tools for the production line.”

All in all, VHM Fonderie’s use of Stratasys’ PolyJet 3D printing technology has led to faster product development and a more effective manufacturing workflow. This has allowed them to provide their Paris-based clients — which includes famous landmarks like the Le Jardin des Tuileries, Le Caroussel du Louvre, and La Place Vendôme — with the manufacturing tools they need in an extremely time-efficient manner.

sand casting

sand casting

Source from..

SEARCH ENGINE: Public libraries in 3D | Niagara Falls Review – Niagara Falls Review


December 18, 2016 Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Google+ Product Reviews


You ask… We answer

Q: I understand the Welland library has 3D printers and now St. Catharines has them. Are people actually using them and if so, what are they using them for?

A: From model car parts to invention prototypes, the 3D printers at Welland’s library are being used by individuals and businesses to make a variety of plastic items.

The pair of printers have been so popular since they were acquired a year ago, Welland Public Library CEO Ken Su said there’s currently a queue of 100 projects.

“Every month we print about 100 to 120 items,” Su said. “Depending on the size of the item, it takes 10, 12 hours to print. That’s why we just can’t keep up with it.”

Su said they’re dealing with the backlog by cutting back on the number of items an individual is allowed to make from three a week to one a week.

The printers make 3D plastic objects based on a design a user uploads online. Su said one person recently made an ice scraper for a car. Another made a hair catcher for the shower drain.

One model car enthusiast couldn’t find a piece he needed, so he made it with the 3D printer. A local shoe business used it for a prototype.

Welland’s library purchased its first 3D printer in December 2015 and a second in April after the strong community response. The machines cost about $1,600 each and work with a laptop and reels of coloured plastic that are about $30-40.

People can use the printers for free thanks to a donation of $3,000 by the Welland Lions Club and $1,500 by the Welland Kiwanis Club, Su said. He expects the printers will be free to use in 2017 as well.

Su said anyone can use the machines but they have to take a course on 3D printing at the library first to learn how they operate.

Niagara-on-the-Lake and Grimsby libraries also have 3D printers. In St. Catharines, the public library purchased two printers this year and rolled them out to the public in September.

Those printers are only available to use through educational programs right now, but the library’s plan is to make them available for general usage in 2017.

David Bott, manager of IT and Networks, said the library is currently writing policy for public usage to deal with issues such as copyright and patent infringement. They’re consulting with other libraries for best practices.

Bott said there will be a cost in St. Catharines based on weight, with a proposed $5 for the first 30 grams and 15 cents per gram after that.

It’s all part of libraries expanding their programming beyond bookshelves.

Su said the Welland Public Library has a VHS to DVD converter for people who want to convert their VHS tapes for preservation and a photo and slide scanner so people can burn old pictures onto a disc or email them.

“Libraries try to offer more of these kinds of programs to the public. For adults or seniors who are interested in these things, they can learn new stuff,” Su said. “For kids, if we can stir up their interest they may pursue that as their university major down the road. Kind of give them a little taste.”

– – – – – 

Q: Why are Niagara Falls house and building numbers all four digits?

A: The numbering goes back to 1970 when Willoughby, Crowland and Chippawa amalgamated with the City of Niagara Falls.

City GIS administrator Karen Canali said each of the townships had their own addressing system, so they had to go through a re-numbering exercise. Four thousand was added in front of all the numbers and a grid system was implemented. If your home was 311, for example, you’d become 4311.

– – – – – 

Q: Why is the arch over the new bridge in St. Catharines painted white? The colour dominates the beautiful aesthetics of the span.

A: White was chosen for the Burgoyne Bridge over Hwy. 406 because it’s a neutral colour.

Niagara Region senior project engineer Jason Marr said the architect came up with it because it’s aesthetically pleasing for the structure.

“We didn’t want to overpower the valley with any exotic colours,” he said. “The white is kind of a natural colour for the valley, so as to not take away from the valley itself.”

– – – – – 

Reader to Reader

“I remember when the cells were in city hall, for two reasons. (Re: Search Engine: Being jailed at city hall, Dec. 10, 2016) When I was real young, in the ’50s, my Mom dragged me in there one day when I was being a real nuisance. One of the officers on duty obliged her by giving me a quick tour and assuring me he’d be happy to house me there if I was going to continue to be a bad boy. Years later, my Dad took me there a couple times as he went to visit one of their regular guests, an old drunk everyone called Jocko. I’d stay in the little waiting room chatting with the desk officer while my Dad went back into the cells with a guard to get Jocko out and take him for a meal and a bath… Those cells were primarily used for overnights (drunk tank), for holding prisoners who were appearing in the court house next door and for temporary holds of people bound for places like Niagara Street.”

– – – – – 

Send your queries to Karena Walter by Email at kwalter@postmedia.com

or by Facebook at www.facebook.com/karenawalter 

Would you use a 3D printer?

0%

0 votes

Yes, if it was free

0%

0 votes

Yes, if it wasn’t too expensive

0%

0 votes

Yes, cost wouldn’t matter

0%

0 votes

No, I have no reason to use it

0%

0 votes

Don’t know

You ask… We answer

Q: I understand the Welland library has 3D printers and now St. Catharines has them. Are people actually using them and if so, what are they using them for?

A: From model car parts to invention prototypes, the 3D printers at Welland’s library are being used by individuals and businesses to make a variety of plastic items.

The pair of printers have been so popular since they were acquired a year ago, Welland Public Library CEO Ken Su said there’s currently a queue of 100 projects.

“Every month we print about 100 to 120 items,” Su said. “Depending on the size of the item, it takes 10, 12 hours to print. That’s why we just can’t keep up with it.”

Su said they’re dealing with the backlog by cutting back on the number of items an individual is allowed to make from three a week to one a week.

The printers make 3D plastic objects based on a design a user uploads online. Su said one person recently made an ice scraper for a car. Another made a hair catcher for the shower drain.

One model car enthusiast couldn’t find a piece he needed, so he made it with the 3D printer. A local shoe business used it for a prototype.

Welland’s library purchased its first 3D printer in December 2015 and a second in April after the strong community response. The machines cost about $1,600 each and work with a laptop and reels of coloured plastic that are about $30-40.

People can use the printers for free thanks to a donation of $3,000 by the Welland Lions Club and $1,500 by the Welland Kiwanis Club, Su said. He expects the printers will be free to use in 2017 as well.

Su said anyone can use the machines but they have to take a course on 3D printing at the library first to learn how they operate.

Niagara-on-the-Lake and Grimsby libraries also have 3D printers. In St. Catharines, the public library purchased two printers this year and rolled them out to the public in September.

Those printers are only available to use through educational programs right now, but the library’s plan is to make them available for general usage in 2017.

David Bott, manager of IT and Networks, said the library is currently writing policy for public usage to deal with issues such as copyright and patent infringement. They’re consulting with other libraries for best practices.

Bott said there will be a cost in St. Catharines based on weight, with a proposed $5 for the first 30 grams and 15 cents per gram after that.

It’s all part of libraries expanding their programming beyond bookshelves.

Su said the Welland Public Library has a VHS to DVD converter for people who want to convert their VHS tapes for preservation and a photo and slide scanner so people can burn old pictures onto a disc or email them.

“Libraries try to offer more of these kinds of programs to the public. For adults or seniors who are interested in these things, they can learn new stuff,” Su said. “For kids, if we can stir up their interest they may pursue that as their university major down the road. Kind of give them a little taste.”

– – – – – 

Q: Why are Niagara Falls house and building numbers all four digits?

A: The numbering goes back to 1970 when Willoughby, Crowland and Chippawa amalgamated with the City of Niagara Falls.

City GIS administrator Karen Canali said each of the townships had their own addressing system, so they had to go through a re-numbering exercise. Four thousand was added in front of all the numbers and a grid system was implemented. If your home was 311, for example, you’d become 4311.

– – – – – 

Q: Why is the arch over the new bridge in St. Catharines painted white? The colour dominates the beautiful aesthetics of the span.

A: White was chosen for the Burgoyne Bridge over Hwy. 406 because it’s a neutral colour.

Niagara Region senior project engineer Jason Marr said the architect came up with it because it’s aesthetically pleasing for the structure.

“We didn’t want to overpower the valley with any exotic colours,” he said. “The white is kind of a natural colour for the valley, so as to not take away from the valley itself.”

– – – – – 

Reader to Reader

“I remember when the cells were in city hall, for two reasons. (Re: Search Engine: Being jailed at city hall, Dec. 10, 2016) When I was real young, in the ’50s, my Mom dragged me in there one day when I was being a real nuisance. One of the officers on duty obliged her by giving me a quick tour and assuring me he’d be happy to house me there if I was going to continue to be a bad boy. Years later, my Dad took me there a couple times as he went to visit one of their regular guests, an old drunk everyone called Jocko. I’d stay in the little waiting room chatting with the desk officer while my Dad went back into the cells with a guard to get Jocko out and take him for a meal and a bath… Those cells were primarily used for overnights (drunk tank), for holding prisoners who were appearing in the court house next door and for temporary holds of people bound for places like Niagara Street.”

– – – – – 

Send your queries to Karena Walter by Email at kwalter@postmedia.com

or by Facebook at www.facebook.com/karenawalter 

Would you use a 3D printer?

0%

0 votes

Yes, if it was free

0%

0 votes

Yes, if it wasn’t too expensive

0%

0 votes

Yes, cost wouldn’t matter

0%

0 votes

No, I have no reason to use it

0%

0 votes

Don’t know

Source from..

Blocks Zero – First Look & Live Stream Recap

3DPrintNerd.com is a 3D Printing Comparison Shopping Engine. With a commitment of delivering consumers a shopping experience, 3dprintnerd.com offers users easy to use search tools that will enable them to make educated decisions when making 3D printing purchases. 3Dprintnerd.com partnered with major shopping marketplaces such as Amazon Associates, Ebay Partners, and Prosperent and e-commerce sites committed in selling consumer and professional 3D printing products.

3D Printed Meso-Brain Project Receives €3.3M Funding


December 18, 2016 Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Google+ all3dp.com


Meso-Brain is a 3D printing project that has received €3.3 million from the European Commission’s Future and Emerging Technology (FET) fund.

Top researchers at Aston University, based in Birmingham, UK, want to replicate the brain’s neural networks using 3D nanoprinting techniques.

The project is called Meso-Brain, and it has received €3.3 million from the European Commission’s Future and Emerging Technology (FET) scheme.

The project uses pluripotent stem cells, generated from adult human cells. Researchers will use the cells to 3D print neural networks using nanoscale 3D laser printed technology.

Professor Edik Rafailov, head of Meso-Brain, said on the Aston University website:

“What we’re proposing to achieve with this project has, until recently, been the stuff of science fiction. Being able to extract and replicate neural networks from the brain through 3D nanoprinting promises to change this. The MESO-BRAIN project has the potential to revolutionise the way we are able to understand the onset and development of disease and discover treatments for those with dementia or brain injuries. We cannot wait to get started!”

What are the Benefits of the Meso-Brain Project?

Most noteworthy is the pluripotent stem cells which are the core technology. Adult tissue cells are genetically modified to behave like embryonic stem cells.

This project has the potential to revolutionize neuroscience research and medicine. It is expected that the Meso-Brain will provide insight into human disease progression along with neuronal growth.

As well as this, other benefits could include using the human neural networks for drug testing and treatment screening, rather than using animals.

Contributions for the Meso-Brain project also come from Axol Bioscience Ltd., Laser Zentrum Hannover, The Institute of Photonic Sciences, the University of Barcelona, and Kite Innovations.

Each of these partners has a specific set of skills and knowledge which will help with the research. The project will run for three years.

meso-brain

meso-brain

Meso-Brain is a 3D printing project that has received €3.3 million from the European Commission’s Future and Emerging Technology (FET) fund.

Top researchers at Aston University, based in Birmingham, UK, want to replicate the brain’s neural networks using 3D nanoprinting techniques.

The project is called Meso-Brain, and it has received €3.3 million from the European Commission’s Future and Emerging Technology (FET) scheme.

The project uses pluripotent stem cells, generated from adult human cells. Researchers will use the cells to 3D print neural networks using nanoscale 3D laser printed technology.

Professor Edik Rafailov, head of Meso-Brain, said on the Aston University website:

“What we’re proposing to achieve with this project has, until recently, been the stuff of science fiction. Being able to extract and replicate neural networks from the brain through 3D nanoprinting promises to change this. The MESO-BRAIN project has the potential to revolutionise the way we are able to understand the onset and development of disease and discover treatments for those with dementia or brain injuries. We cannot wait to get started!”

What are the Benefits of the Meso-Brain Project?

Most noteworthy is the pluripotent stem cells which are the core technology. Adult tissue cells are genetically modified to behave like embryonic stem cells.

This project has the potential to revolutionize neuroscience research and medicine. It is expected that the Meso-Brain will provide insight into human disease progression along with neuronal growth.

As well as this, other benefits could include using the human neural networks for drug testing and treatment screening, rather than using animals.

Contributions for the Meso-Brain project also come from Axol Bioscience Ltd., Laser Zentrum Hannover, The Institute of Photonic Sciences, the University of Barcelona, and Kite Innovations.

Each of these partners has a specific set of skills and knowledge which will help with the research. The project will run for three years.

meso-brain

meso-brain

Source from..

Pioneering 3D Artists & Activists in The 3D Additivist Cookbook


December 18, 2016 Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Google+ all3dp.com


The 3D Additivist Cookbook is a free collection of innovative and disruptive works from over 100 renowned artists, activists, and theorists.

Back in March 2015, two innovative artists named Morehshin Allahyari and Daniel Rourke published The 3D Additivist Manifesto. This mission statement consisted of a thunderous call for creative individuals to join together and push 3D technology far beyond their preconceived limits of today.

The word “Additivism” is a portmanteau word to define the coming together of additive manufacturing and social activism.

Now, to celebrate those who have answered this collaborative and futuristic call, Allahyari and Rourke have released The 3D Additivist Cookbook. The digital anthology showcases the mind-bending work from over 100 artists, activists, and theorists who are involved in the realm of 3D printing technology.

The “cookbook” explores the emergence of 3D printing technology through a social and ecological lens. The digital collection includes a plethora of .obj and .stl files, as well as critical and fictional texts, templates, recipes, otherworldly designs, unique methodologies, and much more.

Recipies for Change in The 3D Additivist Cookbook?

After a brief introduction by Allahyari and Rourke, the artistic duo revives The 3D Additivist Manifesto to alert readers that the call for “Additivism” is far from answered.

The “Cookbook” then lays out an A-Z Index of artists and activists that have used 3D technology to revolutionize the world. These projects range from a fictional guide to the anatomy of a cyborg 3D printer, to a study on how to make plastic printing sustainable and playful.

The digital collection spans 360 pages, jam-packed with different methods and theories detailing how additive manufacturing will reshape and mutate the world we live in. The goal of the “Additivist” is to promote this change in a way that is disruptively futuristic and beneficial to our society and ecosystem.

The 3D Additivist Cookbook can be downloaded for free in the 3D-PDF format. It’s recommend viewing the compendium on Adobe Reader for optimal navigation and the ability to interact with 3D models.

All in all, this all-encompassing guide to the imminent future of 3D printing technology is created for artists and technological anarchist looking to utilize their technological talents to shift the direction that mankind and Mother Nature seems to be heading.

the 3d additivist cookbook

the 3d additivist cookbook

The 3D Additivist Cookbook is a free collection of innovative and disruptive works from over 100 renowned artists, activists, and theorists.

Back in March 2015, two innovative artists named Morehshin Allahyari and Daniel Rourke published The 3D Additivist Manifesto. This mission statement consisted of a thunderous call for creative individuals to join together and push 3D technology far beyond their preconceived limits of today.

The word “Additivism” is a portmanteau word to define the coming together of additive manufacturing and social activism.

Now, to celebrate those who have answered this collaborative and futuristic call, Allahyari and Rourke have released The 3D Additivist Cookbook. The digital anthology showcases the mind-bending work from over 100 artists, activists, and theorists who are involved in the realm of 3D printing technology.

The “cookbook” explores the emergence of 3D printing technology through a social and ecological lens. The digital collection includes a plethora of .obj and .stl files, as well as critical and fictional texts, templates, recipes, otherworldly designs, unique methodologies, and much more.

Recipies for Change in The 3D Additivist Cookbook?

After a brief introduction by Allahyari and Rourke, the artistic duo revives The 3D Additivist Manifesto to alert readers that the call for “Additivism” is far from answered.

The “Cookbook” then lays out an A-Z Index of artists and activists that have used 3D technology to revolutionize the world. These projects range from a fictional guide to the anatomy of a cyborg 3D printer, to a study on how to make plastic printing sustainable and playful.

The digital collection spans 360 pages, jam-packed with different methods and theories detailing how additive manufacturing will reshape and mutate the world we live in. The goal of the “Additivist” is to promote this change in a way that is disruptively futuristic and beneficial to our society and ecosystem.

The 3D Additivist Cookbook can be downloaded for free in the 3D-PDF format. It’s recommend viewing the compendium on Adobe Reader for optimal navigation and the ability to interact with 3D models.

All in all, this all-encompassing guide to the imminent future of 3D printing technology is created for artists and technological anarchist looking to utilize their technological talents to shift the direction that mankind and Mother Nature seems to be heading.

the 3d additivist cookbook

the 3d additivist cookbook

Source from..

Nature-Made or Man-Made? Inside 3D Printing Attendees Try to Guess in The Nature Game – 3DPrint.com


December 18, 2016 Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Google+ 3D Printed Articles


20161215_154845Based on Alan Turing’s famous Turing Test, known as The Imitation Game, The Nature Game seeks to draw attention to the convergence between natural and man-made objects. In conjunction with Uformia, for the first time Inside 3D Printing San Diego housed The Nature Game this week — and we’ve been looking forward to it since it was first announced last month.

The prompt is straightforward, though it is ultimately anything but simple:

“As advanced modeling technologies continue to make significant strides toward ever increasing control over design, manufacturing and creation processes, there is a new question to consider:

Can an object be explicitly designed and fabricated by humans that seems to be naturally grown and/or expresses properties and complexity only found in naturally produced objects?”

Throughout the two-day conference, attendees were invited to stop by The Nature Game’s booth on the exhibit hall floor to examine 18 objects. Finally, at Thursday afternoon’s panel, the answers were revealed, as we could find out which had been created by nature and which through human design.

20161214_114806

20161214_114938

When I stopped by the booth on Wednesday to take a look at the varied objects, I declined to vote. I wanted to remain impartial as a journalist (and I have a personal tendency to be very wrong when voting between two choices). I did chat with Uformia’s CTO, Turlif Vilbrandt, though, about the objects and the nature of the game.

While repeatability is often a focus on successful manufacturing, one light I had not given much thought to about this aspect of production is that repeatability is key in separating nature from man; natural production can never be truly replicated. Vilbrandt used the example of a mixed can of paint to illustrate the difference, telling me that while two hues may be mixed by human hand, it would be impossible to truly replicate the same pattern of swirl between two batches, as nature does still play into the process. The objects on display that had been made by human design were necessarily fully replicable, then; every groove and orifice would be able to be recreated in exact duplicate, and this is the key to what separates the two categories we see in The Nature Game.

Fast forwarding then to Thursday’s panel presentation, I was among the crowd keen to discover the origins of each of these objects.

20161215_154853

“When might 3D printing be beyond detection from nature?” Tyler Benster of Asimov Ventures asked as he kicked off the session.

Present alongside Uformia’s Vilbrandt were a representative from Organovo, a sculptor using 3D printing to reimagine how we make art, a physicist, and a New Zealand-based university lecturer. These individuals of such varied backgrounds were brought together by a shared interest in this unique project.

As the results came in, those involved in The Nature Game indicated that despite the premise of the project, they had not necessarily expected to see quite the split they did, with several objects seeing a 50/50 split in votes from viewers unable to decide whether a piece had been made by nature or by the latest in technology.

20161215_160442-1The only majority-incorrect response, it should be noted, came about in the 3D printed human tissue, an application where Organovo has been making incredible headway for some time now. While there is a cellular-level differentiation to be made between native liver and bioprinted liver, without understanding the biology behind this, looking at the cells that had been printed into ExVive tissue products can certainly be deceptive as one considers the origin.

As 3D printing continues to expand its capabilities, with incredible work from designers and software developers alongside the hardware capabilities to bring highly detailed and organic-appearing structures into the physical world, we may continue to see the lines blur between what is natural and what has been made. Taking the concept of a “maker” to an entirely new level, creations that make viewers do a double-take will certainly take their place in the 21st century as generative design and complex structures bring together nature and maker.

Full results are as follows, as Vilbrandt shared:

  • 1. Human — Peter Fried: The Blaschka Squid (We have in fact seen this beautiful model before.)
    • 71% of voters correctly identified this as being human-made
  • 2. Nature — Bismuth
    • About a 50/50 split among voters
  • 3. Nature — Desert Rose Gypsum
    • Almost 100% correctly identified

20161215_152924

  • 4. Human — Seth Astle
    • About 60% of voters thought this was manmade
  • 5. Human — Evan Kuester: Vascular Tree
    • About 65% thought this was manmade
  • 6. Nature — Ice Jade
    • 97% correctly identified this piece
  • 7. Human — Andy Lomas: Cellular Form
  • 8. Human — Marco Teran: Alligator Skull
    • About a 50/50 split
  • 9. Nature — Statice
    • 100% identified
  • 10. Human — Alan: Buggy Lamp
    • About 60% thought human-made
  • 11. Nature — Cactus Fiber
    • About 65% thought this was natural

20161215_152928

  • 12. Human — Iain Jackson
    • Over 80% correctly identified
  • 13. Human — Mathieu Sanchez: This Is Not a Dog
    • 58% thought this was human-made
  • 14. Human — Ross Stevens
    • 60% thought this was human-made
  • 15. Human — Andrew Werby: Fircactyambar
    • 71% correctly identified this
  • 16. Human — Ross Stevens: Lysom
    • 55% thought human-made
  • 17. Human — Andrew Werby: Crojasamas
    • About 72% correctly identified this
  • 18. Human — Organovo: ExVive Human Liver Tissue and ExVive Human Kidney Tissue
    • About 70% thought this had been nature-made

20161215_152933

[All photos taken by Sarah Goehrke for 3DPrint.com]

20161215_154845Based on Alan Turing’s famous Turing Test, known as The Imitation Game, The Nature Game seeks to draw attention to the convergence between natural and man-made objects. In conjunction with Uformia, for the first time Inside 3D Printing San Diego housed The Nature Game this week — and we’ve been looking forward to it since it was first announced last month.

The prompt is straightforward, though it is ultimately anything but simple:

“As advanced modeling technologies continue to make significant strides toward ever increasing control over design, manufacturing and creation processes, there is a new question to consider:

Can an object be explicitly designed and fabricated by humans that seems to be naturally grown and/or expresses properties and complexity only found in naturally produced objects?”

Throughout the two-day conference, attendees were invited to stop by The Nature Game’s booth on the exhibit hall floor to examine 18 objects. Finally, at Thursday afternoon’s panel, the answers were revealed, as we could find out which had been created by nature and which through human design.

20161214_114806

20161214_114938

When I stopped by the booth on Wednesday to take a look at the varied objects, I declined to vote. I wanted to remain impartial as a journalist (and I have a personal tendency to be very wrong when voting between two choices). I did chat with Uformia’s CTO, Turlif Vilbrandt, though, about the objects and the nature of the game.

While repeatability is often a focus on successful manufacturing, one light I had not given much thought to about this aspect of production is that repeatability is key in separating nature from man; natural production can never be truly replicated. Vilbrandt used the example of a mixed can of paint to illustrate the difference, telling me that while two hues may be mixed by human hand, it would be impossible to truly replicate the same pattern of swirl between two batches, as nature does still play into the process. The objects on display that had been made by human design were necessarily fully replicable, then; every groove and orifice would be able to be recreated in exact duplicate, and this is the key to what separates the two categories we see in The Nature Game.

Fast forwarding then to Thursday’s panel presentation, I was among the crowd keen to discover the origins of each of these objects.

20161215_154853

“When might 3D printing be beyond detection from nature?” Tyler Benster of Asimov Ventures asked as he kicked off the session.

Present alongside Uformia’s Vilbrandt were a representative from Organovo, a sculptor using 3D printing to reimagine how we make art, a physicist, and a New Zealand-based university lecturer. These individuals of such varied backgrounds were brought together by a shared interest in this unique project.

As the results came in, those involved in The Nature Game indicated that despite the premise of the project, they had not necessarily expected to see quite the split they did, with several objects seeing a 50/50 split in votes from viewers unable to decide whether a piece had been made by nature or by the latest in technology.

20161215_160442-1The only majority-incorrect response, it should be noted, came about in the 3D printed human tissue, an application where Organovo has been making incredible headway for some time now. While there is a cellular-level differentiation to be made between native liver and bioprinted liver, without understanding the biology behind this, looking at the cells that had been printed into ExVive tissue products can certainly be deceptive as one considers the origin.

As 3D printing continues to expand its capabilities, with incredible work from designers and software developers alongside the hardware capabilities to bring highly detailed and organic-appearing structures into the physical world, we may continue to see the lines blur between what is natural and what has been made. Taking the concept of a “maker” to an entirely new level, creations that make viewers do a double-take will certainly take their place in the 21st century as generative design and complex structures bring together nature and maker.

Full results are as follows, as Vilbrandt shared:

  • 1. Human — Peter Fried: The Blaschka Squid (We have in fact seen this beautiful model before.)
    • 71% of voters correctly identified this as being human-made
  • 2. Nature — Bismuth
    • About a 50/50 split among voters
  • 3. Nature — Desert Rose Gypsum
    • Almost 100% correctly identified

20161215_152924

  • 4. Human — Seth Astle
    • About 60% of voters thought this was manmade
  • 5. Human — Evan Kuester: Vascular Tree
    • About 65% thought this was manmade
  • 6. Nature — Ice Jade
    • 97% correctly identified this piece
  • 7. Human — Andy Lomas: Cellular Form
  • 8. Human — Marco Teran: Alligator Skull
    • About a 50/50 split
  • 9. Nature — Statice
    • 100% identified
  • 10. Human — Alan: Buggy Lamp
    • About 60% thought human-made
  • 11. Nature — Cactus Fiber
    • About 65% thought this was natural

20161215_152928

  • 12. Human — Iain Jackson
    • Over 80% correctly identified
  • 13. Human — Mathieu Sanchez: This Is Not a Dog
    • 58% thought this was human-made
  • 14. Human — Ross Stevens
    • 60% thought this was human-made
  • 15. Human — Andrew Werby: Fircactyambar
    • 71% correctly identified this
  • 16. Human — Ross Stevens: Lysom
    • 55% thought human-made
  • 17. Human — Andrew Werby: Crojasamas
    • About 72% correctly identified this
  • 18. Human — Organovo: ExVive Human Liver Tissue and ExVive Human Kidney Tissue
    • About 70% thought this had been nature-made

20161215_152933

[All photos taken by Sarah Goehrke for 3DPrint.com]

Source from..

3D printing news this week ICYMI: NASA tests 3D printed injector, Concept Laser ADAPTs, Nano Dimension delivers – 3ders.org (blog)


December 18, 2016 Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Google+ 3D Printed Articles


Dec 17, 2016 | By Benedict

Christmas is just around the corner, but this was a subdued mid-December week, with news headlines dominated by fighting in Syria, Russian hacking scandals, and an explicable meeting between Donald Trump and Kanye West. Luckily, goings-on in the 3D printing world provide slightly more cause for optimism: NASA and Vector Space have tested a 3D printed engine injector, XYZprinting has announced that its 3D printers will be stocked in Best Buy stores, and Nano Dimension has supplied a Dragonfly 2020 PCB 3D printer to a leading defense company.

1. Vector Space and NASA test 3D printed injector

We all know that 3D printing can be out of this world, but the technology is now occasionally used to send things into space. On Wednesday, NASA and Arizona satellite developer Vector Space posted a video showing a jointly developed engine, featuring a 3D printed injector, being tested in Mojave, California. Earlier this year, NASA provided a grant to Vector to design and test the injector as part of the NASA Science, Technology, and Mission Directorate (STMD) Flight Opportunities, a program which extends research labs into space-relevant environments by partnering with small satellite launch companies.

2. Nano Dimension delivers PCB 3D printer to two companies

Israel’s Nano Dimension, world leader in circuit board 3D printing, has been busy shipping its Dragonfly 2020 PCB 3D printer to customers over the last few months. On Thursday, the 3D printing pioneer announced it had sold and delivered one of its machines to “one of the top 10 largest defense companies in the world.” The unnamed customer, headquartered in the United States, purportedly posts annual revenues of more than 20 billion dollars and supplies some of the world’s most advanced defense systems.

The deal with the US defense company was the fifth shipment of a Nano Dimension DragonFly 2020 3D Printer, while the previous shipment, announced December 5, was to a Fortune 100 company, also based in the US. The other current recipients of a Nano Dimension 3D printer are FATHOM, an American advanced manufacturer with expertise in 3D printing; PHYTEC, a German company in the microprocessor-based solutions industry; and an unnamed Israeli defense firm. The deliveries are being made as part of Nano Dimension’s beta program.

3. Metal 3D printer manufacturer Concept Laser joins ADAPT

While Nano Dimension focuses on printing the finest slivers of metal with its silver nano inks, German additive manufacturing company Concept Laser is dealing with all metal shapes and sizes—while simultaneously getting used to working with its new owner, GE. On Thursday, it was announced that Concept Laser had joined ADAPT, the Alliance for the Development of Additive Processing Technologies, a research consortium focused on developing technologies to accelerate the certification and qualification of 3D printed metal parts.

ADAPT Technical Director Aaron Stebner said that the addition of Concept Laser to the alliance would help “extend [its] focus beyond helping businesses qualify parts to include helping manufacturers of 3D metals printers improve their technologies.”

4. MachineWorks partners with Stratasys on Polygonica 3D printing software

In one of two 3D printing stories from the UK in this roundup, Sheffield-based software developer MachineWorks announced on Thursday that it would be partnering with 3D printing giant Stratasys to integrate MachineWorks’ Polygonica software inside Stratasys GrabCAD Print. The Stratasys software will now incorporate Polygonica mesh libraries, enabling automatic mesh repair, mesh offsetting, Boolean operations, and analysis functions.

“GrabCAD and Polygonica share the same philosophy of enabling a single ‘click-to-print’ methodology for 3D models, in the same way we do with 2D printing,” said Dr Fenqiang Lin, MachineWorks Managing Director. “The user doesn’t want or need to know about what software is used to prepare the file, they just want their CAD model printed with the minimum of fuss.”

Polygonica’s mesh repair functions ensure models are closed and watertight, free of self-intersections, badly oriented triangles, noise shells and non-manifold edges. The algorithms can be applied either fully or semi-automatically to ensure minimal disruption to the printing workflow. “MachineWorks has set an industry standard for CNC simulation and verification software,” added Jon Stevenson, Senior Vice President of Global Software at Stratasys.

5. Inkjet printer company Xaar to open 3D printing center in Nottingham

Staying in Britain for a moment, Cambridge-headquartered Xaar, a listed group that supplies industrial inkjet printheads, announced on Thursday that it will open a 3D printing facility in Nottingham, UK. The new Xaar 3D Centre will open in January 2017 and will provide 3D printing services and equipment to manufacturers, materials suppliers, and end users. Xaar has also hired extra engineers to improve its 3D printing operations in Copenhagen, Denmark. “As we build our business in 3D it is vital that we have the in-house resources to support our partners,” said Professor Neil Hopkinson, director of 3D printing at Xaar. “The acquisition of the team in Denmark further extends our expertise.”

6. Best Buy to stock XYZprinting 3D printers

Two months ago, it was announced that major toy retailer Toys R Us would begin stocking XYZprinting 3D printers, specifically the family-friendly da Vinci miniMaker, which costs just $249. XYZprinting has now announced that consumer electronics retailer Best Buy will stock the slightly more advanced da Vinci Mini 3D printer, $289, bringing the hugely popular line of FDM 3D printers onto the high street.

“Our partnerships with Best Buy and Toys R Us are designed to bring this innovative product experience to a whole new subset of customers, while also delivering valuable tools to the educators, designers, professionals and tech enthusiasts that want and need them the most,” said Simon Shen, CEO of XYZprinting and New Kinpo Group. “These retail programs reflect XYZprinting’s dedication to ensuring 3D printing technology is attainable on a national scale.”

7. CRP to show off 3D printed golf club with motion sensors at CES

Less than a month ago, we published a story about the 3D printed KD-1 driver, a golf club made by Krone Golf and CRP Group that can supposedly outperform anything else in its category. CRP Group and CRP USA this week announced it will be showcasing the futuristic club at CES, in partnership with Energica Motor Company INC. Of course, golf clubs don’t usually qualify as consumer electronics, but one version of the KD-1 will be integrated with a dual 9-axis motion sensor, Launch Monitor, and a Professional Instructor. The 3D printed “Smart Club,” which is made from 100% Windform high-performance composite materials, will be released worldwide in 2017.

The innovative KD-1 driver shows that—even just before the festive season—3D printing is still in full swing across a number of industries. Don’t believe it? Other major stories this week included Chinese doctors successfully implanting 3D printed blood vessels into monkeys, Adidas releasing new 3D printed running shoes, and the unveiling of a mobile concrete 3D printer that moves around on caterpillar tracks. Come back next week for more.

Posted in 3D Printing Technology

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Dec 17, 2016 | By Benedict

Christmas is just around the corner, but this was a subdued mid-December week, with news headlines dominated by fighting in Syria, Russian hacking scandals, and an explicable meeting between Donald Trump and Kanye West. Luckily, goings-on in the 3D printing world provide slightly more cause for optimism: NASA and Vector Space have tested a 3D printed engine injector, XYZprinting has announced that its 3D printers will be stocked in Best Buy stores, and Nano Dimension has supplied a Dragonfly 2020 PCB 3D printer to a leading defense company.

1. Vector Space and NASA test 3D printed injector

We all know that 3D printing can be out of this world, but the technology is now occasionally used to send things into space. On Wednesday, NASA and Arizona satellite developer Vector Space posted a video showing a jointly developed engine, featuring a 3D printed injector, being tested in Mojave, California. Earlier this year, NASA provided a grant to Vector to design and test the injector as part of the NASA Science, Technology, and Mission Directorate (STMD) Flight Opportunities, a program which extends research labs into space-relevant environments by partnering with small satellite launch companies.

2. Nano Dimension delivers PCB 3D printer to two companies

Israel’s Nano Dimension, world leader in circuit board 3D printing, has been busy shipping its Dragonfly 2020 PCB 3D printer to customers over the last few months. On Thursday, the 3D printing pioneer announced it had sold and delivered one of its machines to “one of the top 10 largest defense companies in the world.” The unnamed customer, headquartered in the United States, purportedly posts annual revenues of more than 20 billion dollars and supplies some of the world’s most advanced defense systems.

The deal with the US defense company was the fifth shipment of a Nano Dimension DragonFly 2020 3D Printer, while the previous shipment, announced December 5, was to a Fortune 100 company, also based in the US. The other current recipients of a Nano Dimension 3D printer are FATHOM, an American advanced manufacturer with expertise in 3D printing; PHYTEC, a German company in the microprocessor-based solutions industry; and an unnamed Israeli defense firm. The deliveries are being made as part of Nano Dimension’s beta program.

3. Metal 3D printer manufacturer Concept Laser joins ADAPT

While Nano Dimension focuses on printing the finest slivers of metal with its silver nano inks, German additive manufacturing company Concept Laser is dealing with all metal shapes and sizes—while simultaneously getting used to working with its new owner, GE. On Thursday, it was announced that Concept Laser had joined ADAPT, the Alliance for the Development of Additive Processing Technologies, a research consortium focused on developing technologies to accelerate the certification and qualification of 3D printed metal parts.

ADAPT Technical Director Aaron Stebner said that the addition of Concept Laser to the alliance would help “extend [its] focus beyond helping businesses qualify parts to include helping manufacturers of 3D metals printers improve their technologies.”

4. MachineWorks partners with Stratasys on Polygonica 3D printing software

In one of two 3D printing stories from the UK in this roundup, Sheffield-based software developer MachineWorks announced on Thursday that it would be partnering with 3D printing giant Stratasys to integrate MachineWorks’ Polygonica software inside Stratasys GrabCAD Print. The Stratasys software will now incorporate Polygonica mesh libraries, enabling automatic mesh repair, mesh offsetting, Boolean operations, and analysis functions.

“GrabCAD and Polygonica share the same philosophy of enabling a single ‘click-to-print’ methodology for 3D models, in the same way we do with 2D printing,” said Dr Fenqiang Lin, MachineWorks Managing Director. “The user doesn’t want or need to know about what software is used to prepare the file, they just want their CAD model printed with the minimum of fuss.”

Polygonica’s mesh repair functions ensure models are closed and watertight, free of self-intersections, badly oriented triangles, noise shells and non-manifold edges. The algorithms can be applied either fully or semi-automatically to ensure minimal disruption to the printing workflow. “MachineWorks has set an industry standard for CNC simulation and verification software,” added Jon Stevenson, Senior Vice President of Global Software at Stratasys.

5. Inkjet printer company Xaar to open 3D printing center in Nottingham

Staying in Britain for a moment, Cambridge-headquartered Xaar, a listed group that supplies industrial inkjet printheads, announced on Thursday that it will open a 3D printing facility in Nottingham, UK. The new Xaar 3D Centre will open in January 2017 and will provide 3D printing services and equipment to manufacturers, materials suppliers, and end users. Xaar has also hired extra engineers to improve its 3D printing operations in Copenhagen, Denmark. “As we build our business in 3D it is vital that we have the in-house resources to support our partners,” said Professor Neil Hopkinson, director of 3D printing at Xaar. “The acquisition of the team in Denmark further extends our expertise.”

6. Best Buy to stock XYZprinting 3D printers

Two months ago, it was announced that major toy retailer Toys R Us would begin stocking XYZprinting 3D printers, specifically the family-friendly da Vinci miniMaker, which costs just $249. XYZprinting has now announced that consumer electronics retailer Best Buy will stock the slightly more advanced da Vinci Mini 3D printer, $289, bringing the hugely popular line of FDM 3D printers onto the high street.

“Our partnerships with Best Buy and Toys R Us are designed to bring this innovative product experience to a whole new subset of customers, while also delivering valuable tools to the educators, designers, professionals and tech enthusiasts that want and need them the most,” said Simon Shen, CEO of XYZprinting and New Kinpo Group. “These retail programs reflect XYZprinting’s dedication to ensuring 3D printing technology is attainable on a national scale.”

7. CRP to show off 3D printed golf club with motion sensors at CES

Less than a month ago, we published a story about the 3D printed KD-1 driver, a golf club made by Krone Golf and CRP Group that can supposedly outperform anything else in its category. CRP Group and CRP USA this week announced it will be showcasing the futuristic club at CES, in partnership with Energica Motor Company INC. Of course, golf clubs don’t usually qualify as consumer electronics, but one version of the KD-1 will be integrated with a dual 9-axis motion sensor, Launch Monitor, and a Professional Instructor. The 3D printed “Smart Club,” which is made from 100% Windform high-performance composite materials, will be released worldwide in 2017.

The innovative KD-1 driver shows that—even just before the festive season—3D printing is still in full swing across a number of industries. Don’t believe it? Other major stories this week included Chinese doctors successfully implanting 3D printed blood vessels into monkeys, Adidas releasing new 3D printed running shoes, and the unveiling of a mobile concrete 3D printer that moves around on caterpillar tracks. Come back next week for more.

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Edmonton students get hands-on experience with 3D printed prosthetics – CBC.ca


December 18, 2016 Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Google+ 3D Printed Articles


Around 30 Edmonton high school students learned how to do 3D printing to give a helping hand to those in need.

Print Your Mind 3D had students create prosthetic hands with 3D printers to donate to children in developing countries. The hands cost less than $100 to make and can change a child’s life, allowing them to hold a baseball bat or throw a ball again.

The hands each take about four to five hours to assemble, and students made about 20 functioning hands by the end of the day at Queen Elizabeth High School.

The event was put on by Calgary 3D printing company Print Your Mind, as well as Queen Elizabeth School’s Innovate Program and the Enable Community Foundation.

“There are millions of people around the world who, if they are born with a deformity, or if they lose a portion of their hand, they will never have a solution for the rest of their life,” Print Your Mind 3D owner Colin Pischke said.

“The idea is to inspire the kids to see the potential of 3D printing and other technology and how it can impact somebody’s life around the world.”

Around 30 Edmonton high school students learned how to do 3D printing to give a helping hand to those in need.

Print Your Mind 3D had students create prosthetic hands with 3D printers to donate to children in developing countries. The hands cost less than $100 to make and can change a child’s life, allowing them to hold a baseball bat or throw a ball again.

The hands each take about four to five hours to assemble, and students made about 20 functioning hands by the end of the day at Queen Elizabeth High School.

The event was put on by Calgary 3D printing company Print Your Mind, as well as Queen Elizabeth School’s Innovate Program and the Enable Community Foundation.

“There are millions of people around the world who, if they are born with a deformity, or if they lose a portion of their hand, they will never have a solution for the rest of their life,” Print Your Mind 3D owner Colin Pischke said.

“The idea is to inspire the kids to see the potential of 3D printing and other technology and how it can impact somebody’s life around the world.”

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Thor3D Uses Handheld 3D Scanner to Help a Bakery Achieve 60% Savings on Spare Parts – 3DPrint.com


December 18, 2016 Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Google+ 3D Printed Articles


thor-3d-logoRussian 3D imaging company Thor3D, started by ex-employees of professional-grade scanning system producer Artec 3D, has the capability to scan any number of large objects, even ones that aren’t very geometrically rich, using their handheld Thor3D Scanner, thanks in large part to this summer’s Thor3D software version 1.2 and advanced 2D printed marker kit. Even before they took on the challenge of using a handheld scanner to scan objects as big as cars and boats, they were becoming pretty popular – the Thor3D Scanner, while a bit unwieldy, has at least twice the field of view as other handheld 3D scanners, and can digitize a whole automobile in twenty minutes or less, then have it automatically post-processed in about an hour. They recently released their new handheld Drake wireless 3D scanner, but decided to use their tried and true Thor3D when they were called on this fall to help with an unusual and interesting project.

mixer-3d-model

Thor3D’s distribution partner, TEREM, was asked by one of their clients to find a solution to decrease their costs, by reducing expenses on equipment maintenance and repair. The client, a large bakery, operates several professional-grade dough mixers. The screw, which is the spiral part that actually mixes the dough, needed to be replaced every few months, as it wore out quickly. The spare screws had to be shipped all the way from Canada, which was time-consuming and costly. This industry sales trick is one of the oldest in the book – sell the hardware at a low cost, but make the big bucks on your consumables. As an example, the printer in most office buildings is surprisingly affordable, but the toner cartridges for the printer are expensive.

plastic-prototype-with-support-materialTEREM’s first idea was to hire a graphic designer to draw the shape of the screw in a 3D software program, but the result was not good. Even though it looked exactly like the original screw, the 3D model was not balanced properly, and would have broken the entire mixer if it had been allowed to operate for even a few minutes. So then they called on Thor3D for assistance. TEREM was able to use the Thor3D Scanner to scan the original screw, and once the 3D model was ready, they created a perfectly printed replica using a BigRep ONE 3D printer. The 3D printed screw was 65 cm tall, with a diameter of 28 cm, and the supporting materials were removed with ease using liquid LIMONENE.

The Thor3D scanner features user-friendly hardware and software, a built-in touch screen, and can scan with a 3D resolution of up to 1mm, while keeping the accuracy of 0.2mm. But its real selling point is the large field of view, which helps scanning medium and large objects get done in half the time it would normally take. TEREM’s Director of Business Development, Michael Rihirev, says the Thor3D Scanner was an ideal fit for this particular job, due to its large field of view. The mixer screw was scanned with precise accuracy, and it only took seconds to capture the image.

stages-of-the-process

Once the 3D print of the mixer screw was ready to go, the company making the metal product, Spetslit, doused the plastic 3D printed one with ceramic composite. It was then placed into an oven, where high temperatures of 1000°C made all of the plastic burn away, but left the exact shape of the screw intact in the ceramic. Once it was out of the oven, the ceramic composite mold was filled with stainless steel, in order to create the final product.

final-resultsUsing the Thor3D Scanner ultimately helped the bakery achieve a 60% savings! When the bakery would order one of the old parts from Canada, each one would cost them $1,500. But after TEREM suggested 3D scanning and printing to help them reverse engineer and manufacture the mixer screws in their own city, each part only cost $650! 3D printing and additive manufacturing has been used to help more than one company manufacture spare parts ahead of time, and obviously it’s an extremely cost-effective solution to a problem that pops up time and again.This is just another way that 3D scanning and printing is making a positive impact in a place you may not have thought it would.

thor-3d-logoRussian 3D imaging company Thor3D, started by ex-employees of professional-grade scanning system producer Artec 3D, has the capability to scan any number of large objects, even ones that aren’t very geometrically rich, using their handheld Thor3D Scanner, thanks in large part to this summer’s Thor3D software version 1.2 and advanced 2D printed marker kit. Even before they took on the challenge of using a handheld scanner to scan objects as big as cars and boats, they were becoming pretty popular – the Thor3D Scanner, while a bit unwieldy, has at least twice the field of view as other handheld 3D scanners, and can digitize a whole automobile in twenty minutes or less, then have it automatically post-processed in about an hour. They recently released their new handheld Drake wireless 3D scanner, but decided to use their tried and true Thor3D when they were called on this fall to help with an unusual and interesting project.

mixer-3d-model

Thor3D’s distribution partner, TEREM, was asked by one of their clients to find a solution to decrease their costs, by reducing expenses on equipment maintenance and repair. The client, a large bakery, operates several professional-grade dough mixers. The screw, which is the spiral part that actually mixes the dough, needed to be replaced every few months, as it wore out quickly. The spare screws had to be shipped all the way from Canada, which was time-consuming and costly. This industry sales trick is one of the oldest in the book – sell the hardware at a low cost, but make the big bucks on your consumables. As an example, the printer in most office buildings is surprisingly affordable, but the toner cartridges for the printer are expensive.

plastic-prototype-with-support-materialTEREM’s first idea was to hire a graphic designer to draw the shape of the screw in a 3D software program, but the result was not good. Even though it looked exactly like the original screw, the 3D model was not balanced properly, and would have broken the entire mixer if it had been allowed to operate for even a few minutes. So then they called on Thor3D for assistance. TEREM was able to use the Thor3D Scanner to scan the original screw, and once the 3D model was ready, they created a perfectly printed replica using a BigRep ONE 3D printer. The 3D printed screw was 65 cm tall, with a diameter of 28 cm, and the supporting materials were removed with ease using liquid LIMONENE.

The Thor3D scanner features user-friendly hardware and software, a built-in touch screen, and can scan with a 3D resolution of up to 1mm, while keeping the accuracy of 0.2mm. But its real selling point is the large field of view, which helps scanning medium and large objects get done in half the time it would normally take. TEREM’s Director of Business Development, Michael Rihirev, says the Thor3D Scanner was an ideal fit for this particular job, due to its large field of view. The mixer screw was scanned with precise accuracy, and it only took seconds to capture the image.

stages-of-the-process

Once the 3D print of the mixer screw was ready to go, the company making the metal product, Spetslit, doused the plastic 3D printed one with ceramic composite. It was then placed into an oven, where high temperatures of 1000°C made all of the plastic burn away, but left the exact shape of the screw intact in the ceramic. Once it was out of the oven, the ceramic composite mold was filled with stainless steel, in order to create the final product.

final-resultsUsing the Thor3D Scanner ultimately helped the bakery achieve a 60% savings! When the bakery would order one of the old parts from Canada, each one would cost them $1,500. But after TEREM suggested 3D scanning and printing to help them reverse engineer and manufacture the mixer screws in their own city, each part only cost $650! 3D printing and additive manufacturing has been used to help more than one company manufacture spare parts ahead of time, and obviously it’s an extremely cost-effective solution to a problem that pops up time and again.This is just another way that 3D scanning and printing is making a positive impact in a place you may not have thought it would.

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Simple Software Turns any 3D-Printed Model Into a Playable … – Gizmodo


December 18, 2016 Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Google+ 3D Printed Articles


You no longer have to be a Stradivarius, a Gibson, or even a Steinway to make your own musical instruments. Anyone with access to a 3D printer and this simple software, developed by Autodesk Research, can turn any 3D model into a wind instrument capable of playing a variety of different notes.

Once you’ve imported the 3D model you want transformed into an instrument, the Printone software automatically creates a hollow cavity inside which allows air to resonate and actually produce a sound. The software also allows a user to place the mouthpiece anywhere on the model so that’s it’s easy to blow into, and not awkward to play.

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To specify a range of notes the instrument can produce, Printone then has users place and size holes all over the 3D model while the software generates a real-time preview of the sound and specific note the instrument will create. Printone can also automatically position and adjust the size of the holes on the 3D model so that it hits a specific target note while played.

The 3D model can then be turned into an actual instrument using a standard 3D printer. The results might not quite rival the sound you’d get from a more traditional wind instrument, but this is another step towards finally figuring out a good use for 3D printers. As this software and 3D printing technology are further refined, one day you might not have to spend thousands of dollars for a beautiful sounding instrument, you could just turn a 3D scan of your head into one.

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[Autodesk Research]

You no longer have to be a Stradivarius, a Gibson, or even a Steinway to make your own musical instruments. Anyone with access to a 3D printer and this simple software, developed by Autodesk Research, can turn any 3D model into a wind instrument capable of playing a variety of different notes.

Once you’ve imported the 3D model you want transformed into an instrument, the Printone software automatically creates a hollow cavity inside which allows air to resonate and actually produce a sound. The software also allows a user to place the mouthpiece anywhere on the model so that’s it’s easy to blow into, and not awkward to play.

Advertisement

To specify a range of notes the instrument can produce, Printone then has users place and size holes all over the 3D model while the software generates a real-time preview of the sound and specific note the instrument will create. Printone can also automatically position and adjust the size of the holes on the 3D model so that it hits a specific target note while played.

The 3D model can then be turned into an actual instrument using a standard 3D printer. The results might not quite rival the sound you’d get from a more traditional wind instrument, but this is another step towards finally figuring out a good use for 3D printers. As this software and 3D printing technology are further refined, one day you might not have to spend thousands of dollars for a beautiful sounding instrument, you could just turn a 3D scan of your head into one.

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[Autodesk Research]

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Gambody releases 40cm 3D printed Star Wars AT-AT walker to celebrate Rogue One release – 3ders.org (blog)


December 15, 2016 Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Google+ 3D Printed Articles


Dec 14, 2016 | By Benedict

3D printed model company Gambody has unveiled its latest impressive creation: a 3D printed Star Wars AT-AT walker. The 40-cm 3D printed model was made to celebrate the release of Rogue One: A Star Wars Story, in theaters Friday, and can be downloaded for $35.

Until the release of The Force Awakens last year, we hadn’t been treated to a Star Wars movie since the disappointing Revenge of the Sith in 2005. It seems an age ago now, long before the formation of this particular website and a few years before 3D printing really took off at the consumer level. As such, 2005 featured little in the way of 3D printed Star Wars junk: no 3D printed General Grievous, no Thingiverse clone troopers, and no additive manufactured Coruscant, the galaxy’s most boring planet. Today, however, people will 3D print just about everything, and a new cycle of Star Wars movies (thanks, Disney!) is giving makers the perfect excuse to show off their design skills.

The mega-hype surrounding The Force Awakens last year inspired all sorts of 3D printed Star Wars stuff, such as a 3D printed BB-8, a 3D printed Star Destroyer, and of course, a 3D printed Millennium Falcon. Fast forward to the release of the new spinoff story Rogue One, and makers are at it again. Disney themselves have sanctioned a giant 3D printed Death Star that is currently being printed in downtown Madrid, and the creators of last year’s incredible Millennium Falcon have returned—this time to give some additive action to the Empire’s side.

Gambody, the 3D printable model website behind the 3D printed Millennium Falcon and numerous other movie and game-inspired prints, has just unveiled an awesome 40-cm-tall 3D printed AT-AT walker, a vehicle used for both ground assault and transportation, that makers can download for $35. As well as coinciding with the release of Rogue One, the 3D printed, four-legged attack vehicle is also a perfect print for the season: if you’re having snow right now, you could actually take your 3D printed walker outside to reenact the Battle of Hoth.

The 3D printable AT-AT model was created by Gambody guru Elyiot using Autodesk Maya, and stands 40 cm tall and almost 50 cm wide. That, understandably, makes it a pretty demanding print job. The walker consists of 75 3D printed parts, and requires around 1.5 kg of 3D printing material to print in full. When the Gambody team made their version, printing took almost 100 hours, while another 30 hours were required for removing supports, assembly, and painting.

The magnitude of this Star Wars 3D printing project was something that its creator had to contend with. Luckily, he decided it was worth the time, effort, and filament. “The only thing that made me question the success of the project, when I was modeling it, was that its big size might scare people,” admitted Elyiot. “I was afraid that they would consider it a complex 3D model to accept the challenge of 3D printing and displaying it in their home. But, it turned out that the size was an advantage for the 3D model.”

The AT-AT, which was originally inspired the giant and extinct Paraceratherium, has become a symbol of the Star Wars universe, appearing most notably in The Empire Strikes Back, when Empire forces battle the Rebel Alliance on the planet Hoth. You may also recall Luke Skywalker getting into a bit of a tangle with one.

Given the size of the 3D printable AT-AT, you probably won’t be able to make your own by the time Rogue One hits the screen this Friday, but the 3D printing project could nonetheless serve as an enjoyable side serving next to the film itself. Makers can download STL files optimized for either FDM or SLA 3D printers.

Posted in 3D Printing Application

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Dec 14, 2016 | By Benedict

3D printed model company Gambody has unveiled its latest impressive creation: a 3D printed Star Wars AT-AT walker. The 40-cm 3D printed model was made to celebrate the release of Rogue One: A Star Wars Story, in theaters Friday, and can be downloaded for $35.

Until the release of The Force Awakens last year, we hadn’t been treated to a Star Wars movie since the disappointing Revenge of the Sith in 2005. It seems an age ago now, long before the formation of this particular website and a few years before 3D printing really took off at the consumer level. As such, 2005 featured little in the way of 3D printed Star Wars junk: no 3D printed General Grievous, no Thingiverse clone troopers, and no additive manufactured Coruscant, the galaxy’s most boring planet. Today, however, people will 3D print just about everything, and a new cycle of Star Wars movies (thanks, Disney!) is giving makers the perfect excuse to show off their design skills.

The mega-hype surrounding The Force Awakens last year inspired all sorts of 3D printed Star Wars stuff, such as a 3D printed BB-8, a 3D printed Star Destroyer, and of course, a 3D printed Millennium Falcon. Fast forward to the release of the new spinoff story Rogue One, and makers are at it again. Disney themselves have sanctioned a giant 3D printed Death Star that is currently being printed in downtown Madrid, and the creators of last year’s incredible Millennium Falcon have returned—this time to give some additive action to the Empire’s side.

Gambody, the 3D printable model website behind the 3D printed Millennium Falcon and numerous other movie and game-inspired prints, has just unveiled an awesome 40-cm-tall 3D printed AT-AT walker, a vehicle used for both ground assault and transportation, that makers can download for $35. As well as coinciding with the release of Rogue One, the 3D printed, four-legged attack vehicle is also a perfect print for the season: if you’re having snow right now, you could actually take your 3D printed walker outside to reenact the Battle of Hoth.

The 3D printable AT-AT model was created by Gambody guru Elyiot using Autodesk Maya, and stands 40 cm tall and almost 50 cm wide. That, understandably, makes it a pretty demanding print job. The walker consists of 75 3D printed parts, and requires around 1.5 kg of 3D printing material to print in full. When the Gambody team made their version, printing took almost 100 hours, while another 30 hours were required for removing supports, assembly, and painting.

The magnitude of this Star Wars 3D printing project was something that its creator had to contend with. Luckily, he decided it was worth the time, effort, and filament. “The only thing that made me question the success of the project, when I was modeling it, was that its big size might scare people,” admitted Elyiot. “I was afraid that they would consider it a complex 3D model to accept the challenge of 3D printing and displaying it in their home. But, it turned out that the size was an advantage for the 3D model.”

The AT-AT, which was originally inspired the giant and extinct Paraceratherium, has become a symbol of the Star Wars universe, appearing most notably in The Empire Strikes Back, when Empire forces battle the Rebel Alliance on the planet Hoth. You may also recall Luke Skywalker getting into a bit of a tangle with one.

Given the size of the 3D printable AT-AT, you probably won’t be able to make your own by the time Rogue One hits the screen this Friday, but the 3D printing project could nonetheless serve as an enjoyable side serving next to the film itself. Makers can download STL files optimized for either FDM or SLA 3D printers.

Posted in 3D Printing Application

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Nano Dimension Delivers 3D Printer to One of the Top 10 Largest Defense Companies in the World – Yahoo Finance


December 15, 2016 Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Google+ 3D Printed Articles


NESS ZIONA, Israel, Dec. 15, 2016 /PRNewswire/ — Nano Dimension Ltd., a leader in the field of 3D printed electronics (NASDAQ, TASE: NNDM), announced today that its wholly owned subsidiary, Nano Dimension Technologies Ltd., has delivered, in return for payment, a DragonFly 2020 3D Printer to one of the top 10 largest defense companies in the world.

Nano Dimension logo

Nano Dimension logo

The beta customer, which is headquartered in the United States, is one of the world’s leading companies in the fields of defense and technology, with annual revenues of more than 20 billion dollars. The customer supplies some of the world’s most advanced defense systems, which are provided to thousands of civilian and intelligence agencies, governments, defense corporations and industrial companies in the United States and around the world.

This marks Nano Dimension’s fifth delivery of the DragonFly 2020 3D Printer, following deliveries to leading companies from a variety of industries, including a leading defense company in Israel; FATHOM, a U.S.-based advanced manufacturer with expertise in 3D printing; PHYTEC, a leading company in the microprocessor-based solutions industry based in Germany; and a U.S-based, Fortune 100, multinational corporation in the technology industry.

Nano Dimension’s beta program involves the delivery of the company’s DragonFly 2020 3D Printers to leading companies and partners world-wide. The customers are pioneers of additive manufacturing technology’s entry into the world of electronics. They will qualify the DragonFly 2020 technology and use it, among other possibilities, to speed up their product development times. The DragonFly 2020 3D printer also has the potential to strengthen the customer’s in-house innovation capabilities while providing them with enhanced R&D IP security. In return, the company receives valuable feedback for product development and other considerations, including payments.

About Nano Dimension Ltd.
Nano Dimension, founded in 2012, focuses on development of advanced 3D printed electronics systems and advanced additive manufacturing. Nano Dimension’s unique products combine three advanced technologies: 3D inkjet, 3D software and nanomaterials. The company’s primary products include the first 3D printer dedicated to printing multi-layer PCBs (printed circuit boards) and advanced nanotechnology-based conductive and dielectric inks.

In addition to the trading of the company’s American Depositary Shares on NASDAQ, the company’s ordinary shares are also traded on the TASE in Israel. The Bank of New York Mellon serves as the depositary for Nano Dimension.

Forward Looking Statements

This press release contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of the “safe harbor” provisions of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 and other Federal securities laws. Words such as “expects,” “anticipates,” “intends,” “plans,” “believes,” “seeks,” “estimates” and similar expressions or variations of such words are intended to identify forward-looking statements. For example, we are using forward looking statements in this press release when we discuss collaboration with beta customers and the potential of our beta program. Because such statements deal with future events and are based on Nano Dimension’s current expectations, they are subject to various risks and uncertainties and actual results, performance or achievements of Nano Dimension could differ materially from those described in or implied by the statements in this press release.

The forward-looking statements contained or implied in this press release are subject to other risks and uncertainties, including those discussed under the heading “Risk Factors” in Nano Dimension’s prospectus filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) pursuant to Rule 424(b)(4) on September 27, 2016, and in any subsequent filings with the SEC. Except as otherwise required by law, Nano Dimension undertakes no obligation to publicly release any revisions to these forward-looking statements to reflect events or circumstances after the date hereof or to reflect the occurrence of unanticipated events.

NANO DIMENSION INVESTOR RELATIONS

Miri Segal-Scharia
CEO
MS-IR LLC
917-607-8654
msegal@ms-ir.com

To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/nano-dimension-delivers-3d-printer-to-one-of-the-top-10-largest-defense-companies-in-the-world-300378934.html

NESS ZIONA, Israel, Dec. 15, 2016 /PRNewswire/ — Nano Dimension Ltd., a leader in the field of 3D printed electronics (NASDAQ, TASE: NNDM), announced today that its wholly owned subsidiary, Nano Dimension Technologies Ltd., has delivered, in return for payment, a DragonFly 2020 3D Printer to one of the top 10 largest defense companies in the world.

Nano Dimension logo

Nano Dimension logo

The beta customer, which is headquartered in the United States, is one of the world’s leading companies in the fields of defense and technology, with annual revenues of more than 20 billion dollars. The customer supplies some of the world’s most advanced defense systems, which are provided to thousands of civilian and intelligence agencies, governments, defense corporations and industrial companies in the United States and around the world.

This marks Nano Dimension’s fifth delivery of the DragonFly 2020 3D Printer, following deliveries to leading companies from a variety of industries, including a leading defense company in Israel; FATHOM, a U.S.-based advanced manufacturer with expertise in 3D printing; PHYTEC, a leading company in the microprocessor-based solutions industry based in Germany; and a U.S-based, Fortune 100, multinational corporation in the technology industry.

Nano Dimension’s beta program involves the delivery of the company’s DragonFly 2020 3D Printers to leading companies and partners world-wide. The customers are pioneers of additive manufacturing technology’s entry into the world of electronics. They will qualify the DragonFly 2020 technology and use it, among other possibilities, to speed up their product development times. The DragonFly 2020 3D printer also has the potential to strengthen the customer’s in-house innovation capabilities while providing them with enhanced R&D IP security. In return, the company receives valuable feedback for product development and other considerations, including payments.

About Nano Dimension Ltd.
Nano Dimension, founded in 2012, focuses on development of advanced 3D printed electronics systems and advanced additive manufacturing. Nano Dimension’s unique products combine three advanced technologies: 3D inkjet, 3D software and nanomaterials. The company’s primary products include the first 3D printer dedicated to printing multi-layer PCBs (printed circuit boards) and advanced nanotechnology-based conductive and dielectric inks.

In addition to the trading of the company’s American Depositary Shares on NASDAQ, the company’s ordinary shares are also traded on the TASE in Israel. The Bank of New York Mellon serves as the depositary for Nano Dimension.

Forward Looking Statements

This press release contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of the “safe harbor” provisions of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 and other Federal securities laws. Words such as “expects,” “anticipates,” “intends,” “plans,” “believes,” “seeks,” “estimates” and similar expressions or variations of such words are intended to identify forward-looking statements. For example, we are using forward looking statements in this press release when we discuss collaboration with beta customers and the potential of our beta program. Because such statements deal with future events and are based on Nano Dimension’s current expectations, they are subject to various risks and uncertainties and actual results, performance or achievements of Nano Dimension could differ materially from those described in or implied by the statements in this press release.

The forward-looking statements contained or implied in this press release are subject to other risks and uncertainties, including those discussed under the heading “Risk Factors” in Nano Dimension’s prospectus filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) pursuant to Rule 424(b)(4) on September 27, 2016, and in any subsequent filings with the SEC. Except as otherwise required by law, Nano Dimension undertakes no obligation to publicly release any revisions to these forward-looking statements to reflect events or circumstances after the date hereof or to reflect the occurrence of unanticipated events.

NANO DIMENSION INVESTOR RELATIONS

Miri Segal-Scharia
CEO
MS-IR LLC
917-607-8654
msegal@ms-ir.com

To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/nano-dimension-delivers-3d-printer-to-one-of-the-top-10-largest-defense-companies-in-the-world-300378934.html

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Police seize 3D printed guns – Gold Coast Bulletin


December 15, 2016 Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Google+ 3D Printed Articles


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Gold Coast Bulletin

Police seize 3D printed guns
Gold Coast Bulletin
It is believed to be the first time 3D printed guns have been found in Tasmania. “A number of imitation firearms which did not operate were marketed as movie props,” a Tasmania Police spokeswoman said. “The items were seized by Tasmania Police and …

and more »

[unable to retrieve full-text content]


Gold Coast Bulletin

Police seize 3D printed guns
Gold Coast Bulletin
It is believed to be the first time 3D printed guns have been found in Tasmania. “A number of imitation firearms which did not operate were marketed as movie props,” a Tasmania Police spokeswoman said. “The items were seized by Tasmania Police and …

and more »

Source from..

How Oculus could revive the 3D-printing revolution that never happened – Mashable


December 15, 2016 Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Google+ 3D Printed Articles


A model of a golem created in Oculus Medium and 3D printed using a Stratasys device.A model of a golem created in Oculus Medium and 3D printed using a Stratasys device.

Image: oculus medium via facebook 

The last thing anyone expected from virtual reality was the ability to create things that can live in the real world, but that’s exactly what Oculus delivered last week with the release of Oculus Medium. 

Although we’ve shown how the app allows you to sculpt in VR — in the same vein as Google’s paint-in-midair VR app Tilt Brush — what may not be obvious to many is that anything you create in the app can instantly exported to an .obj file (the standard format for virtual 3D objects) that can then be sent to most 3D printers for fabrication.

And, just like that, VR has cleared perhaps the number one hurdle that has stymied many would-be 3D-printing enthusiasts: the often steep learning curve associated with traditional 3D apps. Now, instead of being faced with months of training to use the very basics of CAD (computer-aided design) apps, Oculus Medium allows you to use the tools you’re already an expert with — your hands — to craft almost anything your mind can come up with. 

And once your creation is done, preparing the object (jewelry, toys, tools, accessories, for example) for 3D printing is as simple as pressing an export button and sending the file to your 3D printer.

For years now, passionate advocates of 3D printing like Bre Pettis, the co-founder of MakerBot, watched as 3D printing devices finally became consumer-friendly only to see the often brilliantly designed, compact 3D printers go ignored by mainstream users not already steeped in the tools of the professional design world. There are never guarantees when it comes to app-powered culture shifts, but Oculus Medium looks like 3D printing’s best bet to move from niche hobby to common tool. 

“It’s definitely something that looks more consumer-friendly than anything else I’ve seen before, and it will definitely open up the content pipeline.” -Peter Weijmarshausen, CEO and co-founder of Shapeways

“I knew from the beginning that [3D printing] would get easier and easier over time, and in some of my presentations I’ve talked about a VR being an avenue that would open the content pipeline,” says Peter Weijmarshausen, the co-founder and CEO of Shapeways, a company that takes anyone’s 3D object file and prints in plastic and an assortment of metals. 

“So I saw this coming, and I’m really excited to see that Oculus has released Medium. My first impression is that it’s definitely something that looks more consumer-friendly than anything else I’ve seen before, it will definitely open up the content pipeline. And if the content is easy to create, then more and more people will start using [3D printing], and that’s why I’m super excited about it.”

Adding to the excitement around the app, just days after the app’s launch, the Oculus team soft launched a community for Medium, designed to focus the sudden enthusiasm around the app’s users. And while many of those posting samples of their work online aren’t professional artists, the resulting creations already demonstrate the promise of what’s possible from untrained 3D design dabblers. And for those who are CAD veterans, the examples of what they can achieve illustrate just how powerful Oculus Medium is. 

Of course, much of potential for VR-to-3D printing gaining traction also depends on if VR itself can penetrate the mainstream. 

“At the very beginning most of my thinking was focused on video game and film artists modeling,” says Brian Sharp, the Director of Oculus Medium and one of the engineers behind the project. 

“I remember telling a bunch of people back in mid 2013, before most people had even seen a VR headset, that in the future, at video game companies, there are going to rooms that the artists go into and put these things on their faces to model [games in 3D] and people were like ‘that sounds crazy, you sound like an insane person.’ That was the genesis, and then as we started working on it, it turned into ‘can we bring this to the masses?’” 

If Oculus Medium were backed by almost any other platform, we might call it a tossup. But with Facebook pushing hard to bring VR hardware and software to its over one billion users, betting against VR, at least on the Oculus platform, is probably not the smartest idea. 

If you thought 3D printing was just for hobbyists and design pros, Oculus Medium will change your mind. 

BONUS: Oculus Rift Review: ‘Time will move by without you realizing it’

A model of a golem created in Oculus Medium and 3D printed using a Stratasys device.A model of a golem created in Oculus Medium and 3D printed using a Stratasys device.

Image: oculus medium via facebook 

The last thing anyone expected from virtual reality was the ability to create things that can live in the real world, but that’s exactly what Oculus delivered last week with the release of Oculus Medium. 

Although we’ve shown how the app allows you to sculpt in VR — in the same vein as Google’s paint-in-midair VR app Tilt Brush — what may not be obvious to many is that anything you create in the app can instantly exported to an .obj file (the standard format for virtual 3D objects) that can then be sent to most 3D printers for fabrication.

And, just like that, VR has cleared perhaps the number one hurdle that has stymied many would-be 3D-printing enthusiasts: the often steep learning curve associated with traditional 3D apps. Now, instead of being faced with months of training to use the very basics of CAD (computer-aided design) apps, Oculus Medium allows you to use the tools you’re already an expert with — your hands — to craft almost anything your mind can come up with. 

And once your creation is done, preparing the object (jewelry, toys, tools, accessories, for example) for 3D printing is as simple as pressing an export button and sending the file to your 3D printer.

For years now, passionate advocates of 3D printing like Bre Pettis, the co-founder of MakerBot, watched as 3D printing devices finally became consumer-friendly only to see the often brilliantly designed, compact 3D printers go ignored by mainstream users not already steeped in the tools of the professional design world. There are never guarantees when it comes to app-powered culture shifts, but Oculus Medium looks like 3D printing’s best bet to move from niche hobby to common tool. 

“It’s definitely something that looks more consumer-friendly than anything else I’ve seen before, and it will definitely open up the content pipeline.” -Peter Weijmarshausen, CEO and co-founder of Shapeways

“I knew from the beginning that [3D printing] would get easier and easier over time, and in some of my presentations I’ve talked about a VR being an avenue that would open the content pipeline,” says Peter Weijmarshausen, the co-founder and CEO of Shapeways, a company that takes anyone’s 3D object file and prints in plastic and an assortment of metals. 

“So I saw this coming, and I’m really excited to see that Oculus has released Medium. My first impression is that it’s definitely something that looks more consumer-friendly than anything else I’ve seen before, it will definitely open up the content pipeline. And if the content is easy to create, then more and more people will start using [3D printing], and that’s why I’m super excited about it.”

Adding to the excitement around the app, just days after the app’s launch, the Oculus team soft launched a community for Medium, designed to focus the sudden enthusiasm around the app’s users. And while many of those posting samples of their work online aren’t professional artists, the resulting creations already demonstrate the promise of what’s possible from untrained 3D design dabblers. And for those who are CAD veterans, the examples of what they can achieve illustrate just how powerful Oculus Medium is. 

Of course, much of potential for VR-to-3D printing gaining traction also depends on if VR itself can penetrate the mainstream. 

“At the very beginning most of my thinking was focused on video game and film artists modeling,” says Brian Sharp, the Director of Oculus Medium and one of the engineers behind the project. 

“I remember telling a bunch of people back in mid 2013, before most people had even seen a VR headset, that in the future, at video game companies, there are going to rooms that the artists go into and put these things on their faces to model [games in 3D] and people were like ‘that sounds crazy, you sound like an insane person.’ That was the genesis, and then as we started working on it, it turned into ‘can we bring this to the masses?’” 

If Oculus Medium were backed by almost any other platform, we might call it a tossup. But with Facebook pushing hard to bring VR hardware and software to its over one billion users, betting against VR, at least on the Oculus platform, is probably not the smartest idea. 

If you thought 3D printing was just for hobbyists and design pros, Oculus Medium will change your mind. 

BONUS: Oculus Rift Review: ‘Time will move by without you realizing it’

Source from..

Scholarships from Australian University open up a world of possibilities for 3D printing – 3D Printing Industry


December 15, 2016 Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Google+ Product Reviews


Scholarships from Australian University open up a world of possibilities for 3D printing

Students looking to undertake a PhD in 3D printing should consider the University of Wollongong in New South Wales, Australia. Together with the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), the university is offering 6 full scholarships for proposals featuring either soft robotics, 3D bioprinting, microstructure alloys, or the environmental application of 3D printing to a circular economy.

The campus at New South Wales' University of Wollongong

The campus at New South Wales’ University of Wollongong

Innovating Australia with CSIRO

CSIRO has been bringing innovation to Australia’s infrastructure since 1916, contributing to the welfare of the country’s workers, animals, environment and economic future through a broad range of initiatives. The grants provided to the University of Wollongong are part of CSIRO’s commitment to the evolution of Australia’s manufacturing, moving ‘from heavy industry to high tech products based on sustainable, advanced manufacturing processes’.

The organisation works with in excess of 5,000 industry experts per year, and are contributing an additional specialist supervisor to each of the University’s proposed programs.

A healthy prawn from CSIRO's Novacq prawn feed project helping to sustain Australia's prawn farms. Screenshot via: CSIRO

A healthy prawn from CSIRO’s Novacq prawn feed project helping to sustain Australia’s prawn farms. Screenshot via: CSIRO

Research specialisms

More information and details of how to apply for the Wollongong/CSIRO grants can be found on the university’s website here, but we will give a brief breakdown of each of the 3D printing applications below:

  • Soft Robotics

The ‘Synthetic elastomers for 3D printing for soft robotics’ project brief will be supervised by Professor Geoff Spinks, whose specialisms include the mechanical properties of polymers, and Professor Gursel Alici, who has extensive experience in the various applications of robotics. The CSIRO expert assigned to the project is Dr. Tim Hughes who also has interests in the 3D printing of hydrogels, particularly in their application in contact lenses.

So far, Harvard’s soft-robotic Octobot is probably one of the most well-known examples of research in this field. Through the application of gasses, flexible electronics, and 3D printed platinum ink, the technology a silicone octopus model is capable of independently wiggling its legs.

The Octobot being printed under back light. Image via MIT Technology Review.

An Octobot being printed under back light. Photo via: MIT Technology Review.

  • 3D Bioprinting

3 different projects are put forward for this category, namely ‘Synthetic elastomers for 3D printing for bioprinting’, ‘Development and evaluation of new biologically-based materials for bio-printing cells’ and ‘Engineering and application of 3-dimensional scaffolds for neural network information’.

Organ fabrication is one of the biggest areas in 3D printing research. In an almost Frankenstein-like turn the 3D printed heart is often referred to as the ‘holy grail’ of these developments however, much research is currently at the vessel stage of 3D printing, which scientists will use to gradually build up a functioning organ.

The structure of a 3D printed kidney vessel Image via: Wyss Institute at Harvard University

The structure of a 3D printed kidney vessel Image via: Wyss Institute at Harvard University

  • Microstructure alloys

‘In-situ micro-XRD measuring of micron-scale microstructures in 3D additive manufacturing for functionally graded materials’ is a project that seeks further understanding of the behaviour of microscopic metals for their application in the world’s key manufacturing industries.

Wire Arc laser additive manufacturing is one of the technologies being explored for its potential to fabricate components for aerospace, and is among the expertise of project supervisor Professor Huijun Li. Other experts on the project, doctors Zengxi Pan, Daniel Liang and Nazmul Alam, all have shared expertise in the manufacturing of metals.

3D printed brackets for the Juno mission made on Arcam machine.

3D printed brackets for the Mars Juno mission made on Arcam machine. Photo by: Michael Petch for 3DPI

  • Eco-friendly circular economy

3D printing’s ability to recycle some of the world’s crippling load of waste is an area being popularly explored by both consumer based companies and research institutes.
Projects that cover ‘Managing waste in Indigenous communities through 3D printing centric circular economy’ at Wollongong could not only create a more holistic approach to waste management, but it could also save the world.

Plastic bottles are one of the things that can now be recycled using 3D printing. Photo of bottled in landfill via: ecowastecoalition on Blogspot

Plastic bottles are one of the things that can now be recycled using 3D printing. Photo of bottled in landfill via: ecowastecoalition on Blogspot

Scientific excellence

The University of Wollongong takes the place of the original New South Wales University of Technology set up for workers in the city’s local steel industry. Since 1951, the university has crafted scientific research and innovation into one of its main priorities now standing in the top 1% of the world’s research universities.

If any 3DPI readers are considering applying for a scholarship at Wollongong or have already completed a PhD in 3D printing, we’d love to hear more from you. You can send us an email here, or send a message to us on Facebook.

Featured image shows the University of Wollongong campus at night. Photo via: UOW on Facebook.

Comments

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Scholarships from Australian University open up a world of possibilities for 3D printing

Students looking to undertake a PhD in 3D printing should consider the University of Wollongong in New South Wales, Australia. Together with the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), the university is offering 6 full scholarships for proposals featuring either soft robotics, 3D bioprinting, microstructure alloys, or the environmental application of 3D printing to a circular economy.

The campus at New South Wales' University of Wollongong

The campus at New South Wales’ University of Wollongong

Innovating Australia with CSIRO

CSIRO has been bringing innovation to Australia’s infrastructure since 1916, contributing to the welfare of the country’s workers, animals, environment and economic future through a broad range of initiatives. The grants provided to the University of Wollongong are part of CSIRO’s commitment to the evolution of Australia’s manufacturing, moving ‘from heavy industry to high tech products based on sustainable, advanced manufacturing processes’.

The organisation works with in excess of 5,000 industry experts per year, and are contributing an additional specialist supervisor to each of the University’s proposed programs.

A healthy prawn from CSIRO's Novacq prawn feed project helping to sustain Australia's prawn farms. Screenshot via: CSIRO

A healthy prawn from CSIRO’s Novacq prawn feed project helping to sustain Australia’s prawn farms. Screenshot via: CSIRO

Research specialisms

More information and details of how to apply for the Wollongong/CSIRO grants can be found on the university’s website here, but we will give a brief breakdown of each of the 3D printing applications below:

  • Soft Robotics

The ‘Synthetic elastomers for 3D printing for soft robotics’ project brief will be supervised by Professor Geoff Spinks, whose specialisms include the mechanical properties of polymers, and Professor Gursel Alici, who has extensive experience in the various applications of robotics. The CSIRO expert assigned to the project is Dr. Tim Hughes who also has interests in the 3D printing of hydrogels, particularly in their application in contact lenses.

So far, Harvard’s soft-robotic Octobot is probably one of the most well-known examples of research in this field. Through the application of gasses, flexible electronics, and 3D printed platinum ink, the technology a silicone octopus model is capable of independently wiggling its legs.

The Octobot being printed under back light. Image via MIT Technology Review.

An Octobot being printed under back light. Photo via: MIT Technology Review.

  • 3D Bioprinting

3 different projects are put forward for this category, namely ‘Synthetic elastomers for 3D printing for bioprinting’, ‘Development and evaluation of new biologically-based materials for bio-printing cells’ and ‘Engineering and application of 3-dimensional scaffolds for neural network information’.

Organ fabrication is one of the biggest areas in 3D printing research. In an almost Frankenstein-like turn the 3D printed heart is often referred to as the ‘holy grail’ of these developments however, much research is currently at the vessel stage of 3D printing, which scientists will use to gradually build up a functioning organ.

The structure of a 3D printed kidney vessel Image via: Wyss Institute at Harvard University

The structure of a 3D printed kidney vessel Image via: Wyss Institute at Harvard University

  • Microstructure alloys

‘In-situ micro-XRD measuring of micron-scale microstructures in 3D additive manufacturing for functionally graded materials’ is a project that seeks further understanding of the behaviour of microscopic metals for their application in the world’s key manufacturing industries.

Wire Arc laser additive manufacturing is one of the technologies being explored for its potential to fabricate components for aerospace, and is among the expertise of project supervisor Professor Huijun Li. Other experts on the project, doctors Zengxi Pan, Daniel Liang and Nazmul Alam, all have shared expertise in the manufacturing of metals.

3D printed brackets for the Juno mission made on Arcam machine.

3D printed brackets for the Mars Juno mission made on Arcam machine. Photo by: Michael Petch for 3DPI

  • Eco-friendly circular economy

3D printing’s ability to recycle some of the world’s crippling load of waste is an area being popularly explored by both consumer based companies and research institutes.
Projects that cover ‘Managing waste in Indigenous communities through 3D printing centric circular economy’ at Wollongong could not only create a more holistic approach to waste management, but it could also save the world.

Plastic bottles are one of the things that can now be recycled using 3D printing. Photo of bottled in landfill via: ecowastecoalition on Blogspot

Plastic bottles are one of the things that can now be recycled using 3D printing. Photo of bottled in landfill via: ecowastecoalition on Blogspot

Scientific excellence

The University of Wollongong takes the place of the original New South Wales University of Technology set up for workers in the city’s local steel industry. Since 1951, the university has crafted scientific research and innovation into one of its main priorities now standing in the top 1% of the world’s research universities.

If any 3DPI readers are considering applying for a scholarship at Wollongong or have already completed a PhD in 3D printing, we’d love to hear more from you. You can send us an email here, or send a message to us on Facebook.

Featured image shows the University of Wollongong campus at night. Photo via: UOW on Facebook.

Comments

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3D Printing Tonight #005 – IG: BLOCK ZERO – Live Build!

3DPrintNerd.com is a 3D Printing Comparison Shopping Engine. With a commitment of delivering consumers a shopping experience, 3dprintnerd.com offers users easy to use search tools that will enable them to make educated decisions when making 3D printing purchases. 3Dprintnerd.com partnered with major shopping marketplaces such as Amazon Associates, Ebay Partners, and Prosperent and e-commerce sites committed in selling consumer and professional 3D printing products.

Artists Design and 3D Print at Blender Institute in Amsterdam


December 15, 2016 Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Google+ all3dp.com


A team of creators at the Blender Institute in Amsterdam are using LulzBot Mini 3D printers to bring their creations to life.

Don’t Miss: 20 Best 3D Modeling Software Tools (3D Design/CAD Software)

Nestled just outside of central Amsterdam in the Netherlands, the Blender Institute is a leading light in the open source software movement.

The Blender Foundation is best known for developing the 3D creation software suite Blender, which spans everything from 3D modeling to video game development. Now, the Blender Institute is bringing artists and developers together to collaborate on projects and further enhance the open source software.

According to Andy Goralczyk, art director at Blender Institute, everything created by the team will be under a Creative Commons license. From there, their 3D printable ideas will be published on the Blender Cloud to be freely experimented with and shared.

In addition, the Blender Institute has been utilizing the Lulzbot Mini 3D printer to bring their digital creations to reality. Not only does the Lulzbot Mini provide the Blender Institute with a convenience and high quality 3D prints, but just like the Blender software suite, the 3D printer is also open source.

While open source and free software provide a number of advantages over proprietary technology, the accessibility to information and community is perhaps the biggest benefit.

Using Lulzbot Mini to Bring Ideas to Life at the Blender Institute

The Blender Institute utilized the Lulzbot Mini to print two popular characters from the Blender Cloud platform. The first print was of the legendary open source animated character Big Buck Bunny.

But their most ambitious printing project thus far was Agent 327, a comic book character that was created by Martin Lodewijk. For Agent 327, the large-scale project was separated into seven different printed parts before it was assembled, sanded, and smoothed down.

The Blender Institute is not keen on using too much material, and thus their prints are usually not very solid. They generally utilize ABS, PLA, and colorFabb nGen filaments, and have found the Lulzbot Mini to be the perfect machine to help with their intensive projects.

“I’ve used various other printers before, so I think right now the LulzBot [3D printer] just beat them all in terms of ease of use, ” Goralczyk said.

“I’m a big fan of the auto-leveling and the prints are really easy to remove and there’s virtually no maintenance right now. It’s been really smooth I’m totally impressed.”

In the near future, the Blender Institute plans to continue using 3D modeling and 3D printing to help with physical character development. Watch this space!

Source: Lulzbot

blender institute

blender institute

A team of creators at the Blender Institute in Amsterdam are using LulzBot Mini 3D printers to bring their creations to life.

Don’t Miss: 20 Best 3D Modeling Software Tools (3D Design/CAD Software)

Nestled just outside of central Amsterdam in the Netherlands, the Blender Institute is a leading light in the open source software movement.

The Blender Foundation is best known for developing the 3D creation software suite Blender, which spans everything from 3D modeling to video game development. Now, the Blender Institute is bringing artists and developers together to collaborate on projects and further enhance the open source software.

According to Andy Goralczyk, art director at Blender Institute, everything created by the team will be under a Creative Commons license. From there, their 3D printable ideas will be published on the Blender Cloud to be freely experimented with and shared.

In addition, the Blender Institute has been utilizing the Lulzbot Mini 3D printer to bring their digital creations to reality. Not only does the Lulzbot Mini provide the Blender Institute with a convenience and high quality 3D prints, but just like the Blender software suite, the 3D printer is also open source.

While open source and free software provide a number of advantages over proprietary technology, the accessibility to information and community is perhaps the biggest benefit.

Using Lulzbot Mini to Bring Ideas to Life at the Blender Institute

The Blender Institute utilized the Lulzbot Mini to print two popular characters from the Blender Cloud platform. The first print was of the legendary open source animated character Big Buck Bunny.

But their most ambitious printing project thus far was Agent 327, a comic book character that was created by Martin Lodewijk. For Agent 327, the large-scale project was separated into seven different printed parts before it was assembled, sanded, and smoothed down.

The Blender Institute is not keen on using too much material, and thus their prints are usually not very solid. They generally utilize ABS, PLA, and colorFabb nGen filaments, and have found the Lulzbot Mini to be the perfect machine to help with their intensive projects.

“I’ve used various other printers before, so I think right now the LulzBot [3D printer] just beat them all in terms of ease of use, ” Goralczyk said.

“I’m a big fan of the auto-leveling and the prints are really easy to remove and there’s virtually no maintenance right now. It’s been really smooth I’m totally impressed.”

In the near future, the Blender Institute plans to continue using 3D modeling and 3D printing to help with physical character development. Watch this space!

Source: Lulzbot

blender institute

blender institute

Source from..

ZMorph 2.0 SX 3D Printer Review: Life at the Bleeding Edge

ZMorph 2.0 SX Available at Amazon

Back to Overview

ZMorph 2.0 SX 3D Printer Review: Features & Pricing

zmorph 2.0 SX 3d printer review

zmorph 2.0 SX 3d printer review

The ZMorph 2.0 SX is available in a variety of packages. You can buy a base package with 2 toolheads; the full monty with all 5 toolheads; or a third custom option where you can mix and match.

For pure 3D printing purposes, which would include the single and DUAL PRO extrusion toolheads, you would have to go with the custom option. This would require liaising directly with the ZMorph sales team for a quote.

Alternatively, you can purchase the base package for $2,690 / €2,390, which includes a 1.75 mm single filament extuder and a CNC milling toolhead. Thereafter, you can buy the DUAL PRO toolhead for an additional $550 / €490.

You can also sniff around for a 3.00 mm single filament extruder, or a 1.75 mm dual filament extruder (which has two independent hotends), but these are not strictly essential.

Regardless of which configuration you get, the standard features of the base ZMorph 2.0 SX are a heated bed for 3D printing, a touchsceen user-interface, touch probe and fan add-ons, spare extruder nozzle, a BuildTak plate to overlay on the glass bed, and a nifty toolbox stuffed full of maintenance gear.

In terms of print quality the stated range is 50 to 400 microns, and the build area is 250 x 235 x 165 mm (though available space depends on the toolhead in operation).

Back to Overview

ZMorph 2.0 SX 3D Printer Review: Unboxing & Setup

zmorph 2.0 SX 3D printer review

zmorph 2.0 SX 3D printer review

When it arrived at our offices, the box containing the core unit, peripherals and accessories were all securely packaged. The rods and carriage inside the printer, for example, are fixed in place with little plastic straps so they’re not knocked around in transit.

We mentioned the toolbox already. This has everything you need for both initial setup and long-term maintenance. The individual toolheads come in their own boxes and clear labeling, as do the spools of filament. There’s also a sheaf of basic documentation that steers you to a website for initial setup instructions.

The single filament toolhead was already in place when we unpacked the machine, so that part was taken care of. The first stage is to calibrate the print bed. This is done using a touchprobe in a 3D printed housing, which you connect to the print head by removing one of the fans (also in a 3D printed housing).

It’s rather slow about it, but the calibration requires the touchprobe to measure the level at three points of the plate, and then prompts you to manually tweak three screws by degrees. We weren’t sure how reliable this process was, to be honest. Even after the probe tells you the bed is roughly level, initiating a second round of calibration may contradict itself by saying it isn’t level at all. Confusing!

The next stage is to mount the filament spools to the exterior of the ZMorph 2.0 SX. One can be attached to each side of the unit, much like a vintage Princess Leia hairdo. This is done with a set of 3D printed wheels and spindles, and then you feed the filament through a tube to a direct drive extruder mounted on the toolhead.

Finally, you’re advised to connect the printer to your computer via a USB cable and check for firmware updates using the free Voxelizer Software suite (available for PC and Mac).

Back to Overview

ZMorph 2.0 SX 3D Printer Review: Build Quality & Design

zmorph 2.0 SX 3D printer review

zmorph 2.0 SX 3D printer review

The design of the ZMorph 2.0 SX is truly spectacular. The aesthetic is both retro-futuristic and industrial, and many of the surface components are clearly 3D printed. We’re not aware if ZMorph has any kind of association with the open source RepRap movement, but it’s a stylish and functional tribute to the concept of a self-replicating machine.

The frame of the printer is a triangle made from Aluminum, which is enclosed with injection moulded clear plastic on magnetic hinges. But perhaps the best feature is at it’s heart; it’s built for multi-functional use thanks to modular, swappable components. Again with magnets, each toolhead is guided into place, and power is provided by plugging or unplugging the relevant cables.

The same principle is applied to accessories like the cooling fans and touch probe, and where relevant these same items have 3D printed cases.

The movement of the toolhead is Cartesian, where the head moves on the Z and X axis, and the plate moves back and forth on Y axis. This is a standard foundation for 3D printing, but is also perfectly suited for CNC milling and laser engraving.

The touchscreen interface is also pretty decent — responsive without being laggy — and has clearly laid out menus to access various controls. For connectivity you’re spoiled for choice; there’s an SD card slot, plus connectivity via Ethernet and USB. In theory, you can connect the printer to a wifi router using the Ethernet jack, so it can also be managed over a network.

Alternatively, you can plug in your computer directly to the ZMorph 2.0 SX and directly interface with it using the Voxelizer Software suite.

Back to Overview

ZMorph 2.0 SX 3D Printer Review: Software

zmorph 2.0 SX 3D printer review

zmorph 2.0 SX 3D printer review

With so many disparate features under the hood, the Voxelizer software is the glue that holds everything together. Once you boot it up, you can switch between the different toolheads and manage these respective workflows. That’s what it’s supposed to be in theory, in any case.

In practice, Voxelizer is very bad, very clunky, and not particularly intuitive. We tested it on MacOS and Windows 10, and in either case the experience was overwhelmingly lacklustre.

For 3D printing, the process is to upload the STL file and adjust the orientation and dimensions as necessary. The next stage is to “voxelize” the model, and this is where you can apply quality settings like infill and layer height. Once this is done, you move onto generating the GCode and then save the project to an SD card or run it from your computer if physically connected to the printer.

The slicing engine is agonizingly slow; and the bigger or more complex the model, the slower the process. If you’re running a low-powered computer, it will take even longer. This is not good.

Working with multipart models for dual extrusion is also cumbersome. The software is not intelligent when it comes to arranging them on the buildplate, and it’s made worse if scaling them in size. Manual arrangement of individual elements is required, and if the model is very complicated then it’s very much a case of trial and error.

The quality settings are hidden in a flurry of menus and sub-menus, so there’s a lot of clicking around to find the features you want. We had some head-scratching in particular over the infill settings. Despite specifying something like 10% infill in a honeycomb pattern, the actual infill during printing tended to be much more dense. Perhaps related to this, the subsequent print job would take longer than the official estimation given.

Also buried in the software are options for color blending and experimental image mapping. The color blending was a process of discovery, in terms of picking the ratio of filament to blend and then assigning the material to certain parts of the model. There’s not much in the way of guidance from the software, but we got something workable.

The image mapping, meanwhile, was locked down to a handful of prototype images and objects. But we tried to have some fun with it anyway.

Finally, we did try to use third party slicing software using Cura and Simplify3D profiles

supplied directly by ZMorph, but the results were consistently terrible.Back to Overview

ZMorph 2.0 SX 3D Printer Review: Print Performance

We created multiple test models for both the single and DUAL PRO toolheads on the ZMorph. Results ranged from the ridculous to the sublime. The first thing we had to address before any successful models were produced was dialling in the correct temperature settings for the heated bed and the hotend. Too hot or too cold, and the prints were less than stellar.

zmorph 2.0 sx 3d printer review

zmorph 2.0 sx 3d printer review

First up, there’s the demo model of an astronaut preloaded on every ZMorph 2.0 SX. This is a small little trinket with both straight edges and curves, plus overhangs and fine details, so it’s a capable test subject for single extrusion. It turned out pretty good, at a resolution of 200 microns in yellow filament. The only wrinkle was a cursed raft that’s applied to the model by default, so prising it off is a bit of a pain. If you have a heated bed and decent cooling, a raft is totally unnecessary for your models.

Next up was a single extrusion

3DBenchy at 200 microns in blue filament. This was acceptable, but there was some minor wurfling on the bow of the ship. Interesting to note here was the orientation of the extrusion. Typically in Cura or Simplify3D, we see 3DBenchy being fabricated with the extruder moving in a diagonal fashion. In this instance, the upper deck has horizontal extrusion and the lower deck has vertical extrusion. It’s not a complaint, it’s just different.

Getting a bit more ambitious, we printed a

Laughing Buddha statue at 100 microns in blue filament. This had 10% infill in a honeycomb 3D configuration, which meant that the layers of the infill were not flat hexagons but stacked 3D hexagons for greater strength. The end result was a sturdy, well made object with fine detail, and quite a bit of heft to it. We appreciate the result, but it took 18 hours to print — twice longer than the official estimation given in the software.

Time for some DUAL PRO action. The way this works is that two spools of filament are fed via direct drive to a single hotend, where a reservoir inside the hotend can switch between the two. This provides the option not just for dual color printing, but color blending too.

Zmorph 2.0 SX 3D printer review

Zmorph 2.0 SX 3D printer review

Testing the color blending resulted in our favorite object of the bunch. This was a

Low-Poly Squirtle Pokemon, recently redesigned by Flowalistik for dual extrusion. Digging around in the Voxelizer software, we assigned a color blend to the shell, resulting in a blue, yellow, and green arrangement. The object was scaled up to 200% and printed at 200 microns. It’s not perfect — you can see color bleeding on the same horizontal plane as the shell — but by golly we just love it.

zmorph 2.0 sx 3D printer review

zmorph 2.0 sx 3D printer review

Reverting to non-color blending, we fabricated

a globe of the Earth at 200 microns in yellow and blue filament. The results were disappointing, with too much bleed between the two materials. The end result is more unintentionally green than anything else. We inserted the priming tower inside the globe, as a way to save on filament and strengthen the object, but perhaps this is what caused the excessive bleed.

Finally we moved on to the experimental image mapping feature. We tried mapping a

picture of Paul McCartney and Michael Jackson onto a vase. Printed at 200 microns, the image turned out too garbled to be comprehensible sense. Perhaps we pushed things too far, but in promotional material we’ve seen the Mona Lisa mapped onto a vase, so this attempt should have been a (moon)cakewalk. Frankly, it wasn’t.

All in all, a mixed bag of prints. Some were really good, some not so good. The cause lies with the slicing software, we suspect. And the print times were far too slow. Color blending is an intriguing new technique to keep an eye on, however. With the right settings and filament that’s optimized for this purpose, print projects could take on a whole new dimension.

Back to Overview

ZMorph 2.0 SX 3D Printer Review: Wrapping Up

On first impressions, the ZMorph 2.0 SX dazzled us with the sleek hardware design. But in operation, a series of disappointments took the wind out of our sails.

It feels as though this machine has been over-engineered somewhat. In trying to tick so many boxes, it fails to excel at the one thing that matters to us most in particular — 3D printing.

We’re laying responsibility at the feet of the Voxelizer software suite. For the ZMorph 2.0 SX to succeed, it requires a software solution that’s as elegant and robust as the hardware. And it’s not there yet. It desperately needs refinement to coax better results from the printer.

That said, it should be reiterated that 3D printing is only one of multiple tools available on this platform. CNC milling and laser engraving have their fans, too. Perhaps to the right customer, a range of “good enough” tools is a better investment than just one tool that excels in just one application.

And we really do love the color blending feature on the DUAL PRO toolhead. Even with imperfect execution, the results were outstanding. With some further development, it could well become a killer application for the ZMorph 2.0 SX.

Check ZMorph 2.0 SX Price at Amazon:ZMorph 2.0 SX Available at Amazon

ZMorph 2.0 SX Available at Amazon

Back to OverviewSource from..

What Would it Take to 3D Print a 1:1 Scale Death Star?

death-star3

There are however a few more factors to consider when planning to 3D print a Death Star. For one, we would have to construct a mechanism to move the printer along the surface of what has already been printed, since the entire Death Star would not fit inside the tiny box of a desktop 3D printer. And, the entire construction would have to take place in space, since it would be extremely difficult to blast the finished Death Star into earth’s orbit.

Secondly, we would need some power supply; probably solar power. Lastly, ABS filament starts to get soft an around 105°C and melts at under 300°C. If the Death Star got anywhere near a star during its lifetime, it would simply turn into a giant ball of molten ABS or burn up. There are many more factors that would restrict the construction of such a Death Star with today’s technology.

Conclusion: Is it Worth it?

If you had the time and the money, then definitely; because who wouldn’t want to cruise around the galaxy in their very own Death Star? I can think of one advantage that would come of the extremely long print time. If kept in complete secrecy, the duration of the build might just outlast the existence of the Rebel Alliance or The Resistance, thereby greatly increasing the chances of it ever aging or even being completed.

Source from..

Chinese Scientists Implant 3D Printed Blood Vessels into Monkeys


December 15, 2016 Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Google+ all3dp.com


Chinese scientists at Sichuan Revotek have successfully implanted a 3D printed blood vessel made from stem cells into rhesus monkeys.

Scientists all over the world are working hard on creating biosynthetic alternatives to organs… and now doctors at Sichuan Revotek made a huge step towards this objective.

Revotek filled a bio-printer with bio-ink synthesized from stem cells. They 3D printed blood vessels which were about 2 cm long. The scientists then implanted these 3D printed blood vessels into the chests of thirty rhesus monkeys.

The implanted 3D bioprinted stem cell grafts promoted vascular tissue regeneration. Most interestingly, the merging of the organic aorta and the 3D printed blood vessels took just one week. One month later and the stem cells had grown into the different cells. While over time, according to Revotek, they became “indistinguishable” from the monkeys’ original vessels.

baboons-4371_1920

baboons-4371_1920

Revotek Breakthrough Could Help Save Lives

Kang Yujian is the lead scientist on the Revotek project and director of Regenerative Medicine Research Center of West China Hospital at Sichuan University. He first started working on stem cells in the USA back in the 90s.

Kang believes that his research could benefit millions of people across the globe. Every year 156m people need vessel support structures or artificial blood vessels.

Although this is a major breakthrough and one of the most mature yet, research has been conducted in laboratories on a small-scale. The next challenge will be making this technology as safe as possible.

However, it’s believed that it could be twenty years or more before we see 3D printed organs transplanted into human patients. Also, using stem cells from the same body could bring down the cost of transplants and also increase the chance of healing.

The next step is for the results to be published by Revotek so that other labs across the globe can replicate the procedure. As well as this, Revotek has plans now to begin another trial, this time with more monkeys.

Source: Financial Times

Chinese scientists at Sichuan Revotek have successfully implanted a 3D printed blood vessel made from stem cells into rhesus monkeys.

Scientists all over the world are working hard on creating biosynthetic alternatives to organs… and now doctors at Sichuan Revotek made a huge step towards this objective.

Revotek filled a bio-printer with bio-ink synthesized from stem cells. They 3D printed blood vessels which were about 2 cm long. The scientists then implanted these 3D printed blood vessels into the chests of thirty rhesus monkeys.

The implanted 3D bioprinted stem cell grafts promoted vascular tissue regeneration. Most interestingly, the merging of the organic aorta and the 3D printed blood vessels took just one week. One month later and the stem cells had grown into the different cells. While over time, according to Revotek, they became “indistinguishable” from the monkeys’ original vessels.

baboons-4371_1920

baboons-4371_1920

Revotek Breakthrough Could Help Save Lives

Kang Yujian is the lead scientist on the Revotek project and director of Regenerative Medicine Research Center of West China Hospital at Sichuan University. He first started working on stem cells in the USA back in the 90s.

Kang believes that his research could benefit millions of people across the globe. Every year 156m people need vessel support structures or artificial blood vessels.

Although this is a major breakthrough and one of the most mature yet, research has been conducted in laboratories on a small-scale. The next challenge will be making this technology as safe as possible.

However, it’s believed that it could be twenty years or more before we see 3D printed organs transplanted into human patients. Also, using stem cells from the same body could bring down the cost of transplants and also increase the chance of healing.

The next step is for the results to be published by Revotek so that other labs across the globe can replicate the procedure. As well as this, Revotek has plans now to begin another trial, this time with more monkeys.

Source: Financial Times

Source from..

3D Printer – Ant Union (StrongArm)


December 14, 2016 Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Google+ Press Release


StrongArm is the Industrial-level 3D printer which can fulfill all your requirement. Suitable for professional and newbie user.
Backers: 2
Average Daily Pledges: $4,695
Average Pledge Per Backer: $4695

Funding: $9,390 of $100,000
Dates: Dec 13th -> Jan 12th (30 days)
Project By: Tim Wong

StrongArm is the Industrial-level 3D printer which can fulfill all your requirement. Suitable for professional and newbie user.
Backers: 2
Average Daily Pledges: $4,695
Average Pledge Per Backer: $4695

Funding: $9,390 of $100,000
Dates: Dec 13th -> Jan 12th (30 days)
Project By: Tim Wong

Source from..

The NexD1 – The first Multimaterial & Electronics 3D Printer


December 14, 2016 Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Google+ Press Release


A high end multi-material 3D liquid jet printer. Print circuit boards, flexible materials, and full color.
Backers: 87
Average Daily Pledges: €91,035
Average Pledge Per Backer: €2093

Funding: €182,070 of €200,000
Dates: Dec 13th -> Jan 27th (45 days)
Project By: Next Dynamics

A high end multi-material 3D liquid jet printer. Print circuit boards, flexible materials, and full color.
Backers: 87
Average Daily Pledges: €91,035
Average Pledge Per Backer: €2093

Funding: €182,070 of €200,000
Dates: Dec 13th -> Jan 27th (45 days)
Project By: Next Dynamics

Source from..

Make 3D Printed Pasta Shapes for Barilla’s Smart Pasta Design Contest


December 14, 2016 Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Google+ all3dp.com


Barilla is sponsoring their 3D printed pasta design contest with help from Desall. To enter, simply model and upload your perfect pasta shape.

If there is one thing the world needs, it’s more pasta shapes, right? How do you test out new shape ideas? With a 3D printer of course.

Back in 2014, Barilla held a contest in which designers from all over the planet could come up with new and interesting 3D printable pasta shapes.

Now, they’re planning on doing the same again.

However, this time around, Barilla is working with crowdsourcing platform Desall to bring you The Smart Pasta competition. From now until March 1, 2017, you can enter your pasta design for the chance to win $1,000.

If you’d like to participate, create a 3D printable design of a shape you’d like to see on your plate. Next, simply upload this design file along with a PDF brief to the contest website. Winners will be announced at the beginning of May.

The company’s 3D printer for pasta was first announced at World Expo 2015 in Milan and presented to the public at CIBUS 2016.

Check out the video below for an idea of what to expect.

Barilla Smart Pasta Guidelines

Before you jump into designing your 3D pasta shape, read over the guidelines. Your pasta design will be judged on consistency, creativity and feasibility.

Have more than one idea? No problem. Feel free to enter as many entries as you can come up with. However, only the projects published via the upload page on the Desall website will be accepted.

You can participate in the contest for free. And, even if you don’t win, Barilla is also offering a €1000 payment for any designs they would like to take for commercial use – whether they’re winning entries or not.

Desall offers some useful design tips on their competition page:

“Try, for example, to think how the pasta shape you suggest might interact with the other ingredients of the recipe. Otherwise, try to consider the various effects you might obtain, changing the pasta geometry in some points, causing a metamorphosis, a change of state, a transformation of the pasta shape in the cooking or preparation processes.”

For more information, create an account and read the Contest Agreement. You can also read over what Barilla is looking for here.

Struggling to find ideas? Check out other people’s work on the Desall Inspiration tab.

smart-pasta

smart-pasta

Barilla is sponsoring their 3D printed pasta design contest with help from Desall. To enter, simply model and upload your perfect pasta shape.

If there is one thing the world needs, it’s more pasta shapes, right? How do you test out new shape ideas? With a 3D printer of course.

Back in 2014, Barilla held a contest in which designers from all over the planet could come up with new and interesting 3D printable pasta shapes.

Now, they’re planning on doing the same again.

However, this time around, Barilla is working with crowdsourcing platform Desall to bring you The Smart Pasta competition. From now until March 1, 2017, you can enter your pasta design for the chance to win $1,000.

If you’d like to participate, create a 3D printable design of a shape you’d like to see on your plate. Next, simply upload this design file along with a PDF brief to the contest website. Winners will be announced at the beginning of May.

The company’s 3D printer for pasta was first announced at World Expo 2015 in Milan and presented to the public at CIBUS 2016.

Check out the video below for an idea of what to expect.

Barilla Smart Pasta Guidelines

Before you jump into designing your 3D pasta shape, read over the guidelines. Your pasta design will be judged on consistency, creativity and feasibility.

Have more than one idea? No problem. Feel free to enter as many entries as you can come up with. However, only the projects published via the upload page on the Desall website will be accepted.

You can participate in the contest for free. And, even if you don’t win, Barilla is also offering a €1000 payment for any designs they would like to take for commercial use – whether they’re winning entries or not.

Desall offers some useful design tips on their competition page:

“Try, for example, to think how the pasta shape you suggest might interact with the other ingredients of the recipe. Otherwise, try to consider the various effects you might obtain, changing the pasta geometry in some points, causing a metamorphosis, a change of state, a transformation of the pasta shape in the cooking or preparation processes.”

For more information, create an account and read the Contest Agreement. You can also read over what Barilla is looking for here.

Struggling to find ideas? Check out other people’s work on the Desall Inspiration tab.

smart-pasta

smart-pasta

Source from..

Massive 3D Printed Death Star in Madrid to Promote Rogue One


December 14, 2016 Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Google+ all3dp.com


Excited about the new Star Wars film, Rogue One? In Madrid, Spain a Death Star replica is fabricated in real-time on a huge 3D printer.

Don’t Miss: What Would it Take to 3D Print a 1:1 Scale Death Star?

This past weekend a huge, massive, gigantic 3D printer mysteriously appeared in downtown Madrid, Spain. The purpose? To fabricate a super-sized Death Star from “Star Wars” infamy.

Obviously, this is not going to be a moon-sized weapon of mass destruction. That would be silly. But it’s pretty cool to see a Death Star fabricated in real-time by an even bigger 3D printing machine.

The purpose of the stunt is to promote the impending release of “Rogue One” from Walt Disney Studios, appearing at a multiplex near you this festive season.

Located on the Puerta de Alcalá square, the 3D printer was provided by ErectorBot, an American manufacturer of very large 3D printers based around fused filament fabrication (FFF) technology.

death star rogue one

3D Printing a Death Star Will Take a While

Don’t Miss: 30 Biggest 3D Printers In The World (Right Now)

The ErecterBot 3D printer has been specially manufactured for this project and is enclosed in a large glass cube.

The purpose of the cube is so the public can gawp and follow the progress of the 3D printing action from a safe distance. Also, and this problem will be familiar to anyone who’s used an FFF machine, the glass should project the print from environmental interference like heat and moisture.

The model Death Star is printed from PLA filament. Once complete, it will be a whopping two meters in diameter and weigh over 100 kilograms. Supervising the entire non-stop process is ErectorBot Engineer Leonar Dodd.

So what about this new Star Wars movie, then? “Rogue One” will premiere in Spain on Thursday 15 December. But barring any unforeseen complications, the corresponding model won’t be completed until Sunday 18 December.

Follow the action on twitter with the hashtag #DeathStarMission. Furthermore, you can remotely monitor the progress of the print job on the dedicated Death Star Mission website.

Source: One Magazine

death star rogue one

death star rogue one

Excited about the new Star Wars film, Rogue One? In Madrid, Spain a Death Star replica is fabricated in real-time on a huge 3D printer.

Don’t Miss: What Would it Take to 3D Print a 1:1 Scale Death Star?

This past weekend a huge, massive, gigantic 3D printer mysteriously appeared in downtown Madrid, Spain. The purpose? To fabricate a super-sized Death Star from “Star Wars” infamy.

Obviously, this is not going to be a moon-sized weapon of mass destruction. That would be silly. But it’s pretty cool to see a Death Star fabricated in real-time by an even bigger 3D printing machine.

The purpose of the stunt is to promote the impending release of “Rogue One” from Walt Disney Studios, appearing at a multiplex near you this festive season.

Located on the Puerta de Alcalá square, the 3D printer was provided by ErectorBot, an American manufacturer of very large 3D printers based around fused filament fabrication (FFF) technology.

death star rogue one

3D Printing a Death Star Will Take a While

Don’t Miss: 30 Biggest 3D Printers In The World (Right Now)

The ErecterBot 3D printer has been specially manufactured for this project and is enclosed in a large glass cube.

The purpose of the cube is so the public can gawp and follow the progress of the 3D printing action from a safe distance. Also, and this problem will be familiar to anyone who’s used an FFF machine, the glass should project the print from environmental interference like heat and moisture.

The model Death Star is printed from PLA filament. Once complete, it will be a whopping two meters in diameter and weigh over 100 kilograms. Supervising the entire non-stop process is ErectorBot Engineer Leonar Dodd.

So what about this new Star Wars movie, then? “Rogue One” will premiere in Spain on Thursday 15 December. But barring any unforeseen complications, the corresponding model won’t be completed until Sunday 18 December.

Follow the action on twitter with the hashtag #DeathStarMission. Furthermore, you can remotely monitor the progress of the print job on the dedicated Death Star Mission website.

Source: One Magazine

death star rogue one

death star rogue one

Source from..

3D Printed EmuCase: Smartphone Turned Into a Game Boy Classic

6bimuq5r

The 3D printed parts of the EmuCase, which were made with

Autodesk‘s 123D, aren’t difficult to print (files here). They work with an HTC M8/S, but you should be able to adapt the designs to fit your smartphone.

The EmuCase consists of just two 3D printed parts: The case and an inlay cover to keep the controls covered. But as Gabbelago states, “If you don’t have access to a 3D printer (which I assume means 99% of you), it’s the buttons that make this work. The case itself is unimportant. Make one from wood, cardboard, whatever you can think of!”

As an alternative, you could use 

All3DP’s price comparison service to get the case printed professionally at the lowest possible price. You can find detailed build instructions at Imgur.

(Source:

Kotaku)

Reddit-user Gabbelago came up with a great idea: With the help of 3D printing and some copper wiring, he turned his HTC smartphone into a lovely Game Boy Classic.

Gabriel Olofsson, also known as Gabbelago on Reddit, is a guy who loves games (well, who doesn’t). He plays them on his HTC M8/S smartphone using the My Boy Emulator. One day he decided to make a Game Boy-inspired shell for it and called it the “EmuCase”. “As to if it was designed for Pokemon, I personally mostly play Pokemon but basically I just made a case that would work for Game Boy style games,” said Gabbelago when Kotaku asked what led him to create the case.

Now, he decided to make the case available for everyone. It‘s a beauty, as you can see in the image gallery below.

EmuCase is Neither Expensive Nor Complicated to Make

Gabbelago’s EmuCase isn’t very difficult to make. First, you need an old gamepad to harvest the buttons and some additional parts. The parts list also consists of some copper tape, copper wire, a needle and the rubber dome from the donor gamepad.

So, how does it work? With the needle, you make some holes in the harvested plastic parts and feed a copper wire through it. As you probably know, all modern smartphone screens are conductive. So the wire passes the electrical impulses directly onto the screen – that’s a nice and effective hack.

6bimuq5r

6bimuq5r

The 3D printed parts of the EmuCase, which were made with

Autodesk‘s 123D, aren’t difficult to print (files here). They work with an HTC M8/S, but you should be able to adapt the designs to fit your smartphone.

The EmuCase consists of just two 3D printed parts: The case and an inlay cover to keep the controls covered. But as Gabbelago states, “If you don’t have access to a 3D printer (which I assume means 99% of you), it’s the buttons that make this work. The case itself is unimportant. Make one from wood, cardboard, whatever you can think of!”

As an alternative, you could use 

All3DP’s price comparison service to get the case printed professionally at the lowest possible price. You can find detailed build instructions at Imgur.

(Source:

Kotaku)Source from..

Use a Raspberry Pi and a Projector to Convert Old Film Reels


December 14, 2016 Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Google+ all3dp.com


Want a cheap and easy way to automatically digitize old open-reel films? Maker Joe Herman used a Raspberry Pi to help share his old footage.

Nowadays, it’s increasingly rare to find access to an open-reel film projector, leaving many traditional home videos to sit in the attic and collect dust. But one maker named Joe Herman recently discovered a cheap and efficient way to automatically convert old film reels using a Raspberry Pi and just a few 3D printed parts.

In the past, the Raspberry Pi system has been used to create some impressive projects and is especially useful as a device that costs just $35. Herman has now added his own project to that impressive list, using this miniaturized computer hardware and some 3D printed parts to convert and watch his old family films.

Herman had an archive of 130 films recorded by his grandfather, some of which were over 70 years old. Though projectors capable of playing this film format are hard to find, this film can last a long time when stored correctly.

However, sharing these videos is the tricky part, especially with family members who oftentimes live far away. Herman needed a better way to share this old footage with his friends and family. So, he created a DIY solution by using a Raspberry Pi, various 3D printed parts, and an old projector. The results from his tinkering can be seen in the video below:

How Raspberry Pi Was Used to Convert Old Film Reels

While many people now rely on digital platforms such as YouTube or Vimeo to share their videos, Herman had a reel-to-reel projector, so sharing his videos wasn’t as simple as clicking send. Although there are a number of companies that will convert your old footage for you, Herman wanted to save himself money and decided to take the DIY route.

In order to upload his old footage from to the internet, Herman decided to build the film converter himself by using various parts he had in around his house. By using a few 3D printed parts, he was able to convert the old reel-to-reel projector into a Raspberry Pi-controlled digital transfer machine. The picture below shows how Herman set up his reformatted projector.

The final result is a frame-by-frame capture system that creates beautiful and vintage-styled images. Best of all, these converted images can be easily uploaded and shared with friends and family from anywhere. If you want to check out more details on Herman’s final results, be sure to visit his Vimeo channel.

Source: Geek

Want a cheap and easy way to automatically digitize old open-reel films? Maker Joe Herman used a Raspberry Pi to help share his old footage.

Nowadays, it’s increasingly rare to find access to an open-reel film projector, leaving many traditional home videos to sit in the attic and collect dust. But one maker named Joe Herman recently discovered a cheap and efficient way to automatically convert old film reels using a Raspberry Pi and just a few 3D printed parts.

In the past, the Raspberry Pi system has been used to create some impressive projects and is especially useful as a device that costs just $35. Herman has now added his own project to that impressive list, using this miniaturized computer hardware and some 3D printed parts to convert and watch his old family films.

Herman had an archive of 130 films recorded by his grandfather, some of which were over 70 years old. Though projectors capable of playing this film format are hard to find, this film can last a long time when stored correctly.

However, sharing these videos is the tricky part, especially with family members who oftentimes live far away. Herman needed a better way to share this old footage with his friends and family. So, he created a DIY solution by using a Raspberry Pi, various 3D printed parts, and an old projector. The results from his tinkering can be seen in the video below:

How Raspberry Pi Was Used to Convert Old Film Reels

While many people now rely on digital platforms such as YouTube or Vimeo to share their videos, Herman had a reel-to-reel projector, so sharing his videos wasn’t as simple as clicking send. Although there are a number of companies that will convert your old footage for you, Herman wanted to save himself money and decided to take the DIY route.

In order to upload his old footage from to the internet, Herman decided to build the film converter himself by using various parts he had in around his house. By using a few 3D printed parts, he was able to convert the old reel-to-reel projector into a Raspberry Pi-controlled digital transfer machine. The picture below shows how Herman set up his reformatted projector.

The final result is a frame-by-frame capture system that creates beautiful and vintage-styled images. Best of all, these converted images can be easily uploaded and shared with friends and family from anywhere. If you want to check out more details on Herman’s final results, be sure to visit his Vimeo channel.

Source: Geek

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The Essential Guide to Metal 3D Printing

Xline 2000R

The largest powder metal 3D printer currently on the market is Concept Laser’s XLine 1000. It has a build volume of 630 x 400 x 500 mm, and is as large as a single story house.

The German company, which is one of the primary 3D printer suppliers of huge aerospace companies such as Airbus, has recently introduced a new printer, the Xline 2000.

The 2000 has two lasers and even larger build volume of 800 x 400 x 500 mm. This machine, which uses Concept Laser’s LaserCUSING (a type of selective laser melting) technology, can 3D print objects in alloys of steel, aluminum, nickel, titanium, precious metals, and even some pure materials (titanium and high-grade steels.)

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30 Great Arduino 3D Printer Projects You Can Build at Home

1-bb8

What is this? Ambitious makers and sci-fi nerds unite, this functional remote controlled and 3D printed BB-8 droid featured in Star Wars: The Force Awakens is sure to bring the force wherever you take it. The 3D printed robot, which is powered by an Arduino board, balances on two wheels, plays sounds, and even has several programmable LEDs. Though full-sized 3D printed versions of the BB-8 droid exist, this half-sized model takes just 50 hours to print and requires much less post-processing.

Skill level? Expert.

Find more info at:

Instructables.Source from..

Twiddle Cube: Beware of The Fake Fidget Toys

bildschirmfoto-2016-12-12-um-15-15-29

According to the Website, the Twiddle Cube is trademarked. If you do some research on the

Global Brand Database, Twiddle Cube doesn’t show up. Also, you won’t find it in the listed US trademark databases. 

It might be the company got granted the trademark, but thanks to a lag, the data doesn’t show in the databases yet.

So: Should I Buy the Twiddle Cube?

On the positive side, the site is “Powered by Shopify“, which is one of the leading online commerce platforms. It usually doesn’t allow anonymous or fraudulent merchants to use its services.

So, what does that mean?

  1. Either the Twiddle Cube company is extremely clumsy in establishing trust on their website.
  2. Maybe they have second thoughts revealing their identity because they fear repercussions from the Fidget Cube makers.
  3. Or – and that’s what the makers of the original Fidget Cube are thinking – there’s a chance that scammers just collect the money and run. Here’s their statement: “As we’ve mentioned before, many of you are aware of the scams being run that claim to have Fidget Cube for sale. (…) At this time, ANY online store, retailer, or listing on platforms such as eBay/Amazon/etc. (with the exception of our official website antsylabs.com) that is claiming to sell Fidget Cube is either selling cheap, nonfunctioning counterfeits, or accepting payments with no intention of shipping any product at all.”

Until All3DP hears from the makers of the Twiddle Cube to clear up these inconsistencies, we personally will refrain from buying one.

Source from..

Wild and Woolly: 3D Printed iPhone Cases Covered in Real Fur


December 14, 2016 Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Google+ all3dp.com


If you’re looking for a new way to accessorise your iPhone and don’t mind using real fur, Wild and Woolly has a fluffy 3D printed solution.

If smartphone cases in the shape of rabbit ears and hamburgers aren’t your style anymore, perhaps you’d be interested in something big and fluffy instead? Wild and Woolly is an American startup which uses “ethically sourced fur” to make individual iPhone cases.

Nina Cheng is the founder of the startup. She based the name on the fur trade industry during America’s expansion in the 1850s. Each fluffy case is named after an American fur trading post. 

The production process for the fur means they’re more expensive than your regular case and can cost you up to $415. However, you’re paying for real, 100% ethically-sourced fur.

Cheng uses ethical suppliers including a Yup’ik Eskimo village in Western Alaska and Finland-based SAGA Furs. Underneath the fur is a 3D printed plastic case to keep your precious iPhone protected.

wild and woolly

wild and woolly

Wild and Woolly Furry 3D Printed Case is Unique

The fur used by Wild and Woolly includes fox, beaver, and mink. But, to make sure there’s no excessive use, Cheng keeps her production small-batch and local.

She buys fur when it’s needed, meaning there’s very little waste. The hard plastic case is 3D printed by Voodoo Manufacturing based in Brooklyn, New York. With the 3D printed design, Cheng ensured a camera porthole was made to keep the fur from obstructing your pictures.

Professional furriers based in Manhattan’s Garment District add the fur to the cases, keeping every aspect of the design local. The good quality fur is easy to keep, durable and protective — as well as partially water-resistant too.

For all of these benefits, you can expect to pay between $325 and $415, depending on the case. However, this price can give you peace of mind that the animals providing the fur were properly treated. Spend less and you can’t be so sure.

These cases are suitable for the iPhone 6, 6 Plus, 6s, 6s Plus, 7, and 7 Plus. Tempted to buy your own? The cases are being sold on the Wild and Woolly website, or Opening Ceremony stores in NYC and Los Angeles.

Source: Business Insider

wild and woolly

wild and woolly

If you’re looking for a new way to accessorise your iPhone and don’t mind using real fur, Wild and Woolly has a fluffy 3D printed solution.

If smartphone cases in the shape of rabbit ears and hamburgers aren’t your style anymore, perhaps you’d be interested in something big and fluffy instead? Wild and Woolly is an American startup which uses “ethically sourced fur” to make individual iPhone cases.

Nina Cheng is the founder of the startup. She based the name on the fur trade industry during America’s expansion in the 1850s. Each fluffy case is named after an American fur trading post. 

The production process for the fur means they’re more expensive than your regular case and can cost you up to $415. However, you’re paying for real, 100% ethically-sourced fur.

Cheng uses ethical suppliers including a Yup’ik Eskimo village in Western Alaska and Finland-based SAGA Furs. Underneath the fur is a 3D printed plastic case to keep your precious iPhone protected.

wild and woolly

wild and woolly

Wild and Woolly Furry 3D Printed Case is Unique

The fur used by Wild and Woolly includes fox, beaver, and mink. But, to make sure there’s no excessive use, Cheng keeps her production small-batch and local.

She buys fur when it’s needed, meaning there’s very little waste. The hard plastic case is 3D printed by Voodoo Manufacturing based in Brooklyn, New York. With the 3D printed design, Cheng ensured a camera porthole was made to keep the fur from obstructing your pictures.

Professional furriers based in Manhattan’s Garment District add the fur to the cases, keeping every aspect of the design local. The good quality fur is easy to keep, durable and protective — as well as partially water-resistant too.

For all of these benefits, you can expect to pay between $325 and $415, depending on the case. However, this price can give you peace of mind that the animals providing the fur were properly treated. Spend less and you can’t be so sure.

These cases are suitable for the iPhone 6, 6 Plus, 6s, 6s Plus, 7, and 7 Plus. Tempted to buy your own? The cases are being sold on the Wild and Woolly website, or Opening Ceremony stores in NYC and Los Angeles.

Source: Business Insider

wild and woolly

wild and woolly

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